U.S. interest in U.K. travel soars after Brexit

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The Unraveling of the U.K. Over Brexit

June 27 (Reuters) - Several online travel sites have seen a jump in queries from Americans about travel to the United Kingdom since it voted to leave the European Union, a sign so-called "Brexit" and the resulting drop in the value of the pound currency may spur U.S. visits to Britain.

One site found that more Britons were also asking about flights to the United States.

Travel agents, hotel chains and airlines say it is too early to tell if the vote has impacted bookings. Financial analysts at the Buckingham Research Group had predicted a "Brexit" would slow the British economy and airline sales. But some U.S. travel agents are advising travelers to book U.K. trips now and expect to see a bump in bookings with time.

Click through images of Brexit protesters in favor of staying in the EU:

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Brexit protesters in favor of staying in the EU
Two activists with the EU flag and Union Jack painted on their faces kiss each other in front of Brandenburg Gate to protest against British exit from the European Union, in Berlin, Germany, June 19, 2016. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
Anti-government demonstrators hold placards reading "No Brexit" during a protest outside the parliament in Athens, Greece June 15, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
A protestor uses a megaphone to address a crowd as they gather outside The Houses of Parliament to demonstrate against the European Union (EU) referendum result, in London, U.K., on Saturday, June 25, 2016. The U.K. voted to quit the European Union after more than four decades in a stunning rejection of the continent's postwar political and economic order. Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protestor holds a placard which reads 'YES 2 EU' to demonstrate against the European Union (EU) referendum result, outside The Houses of Parliament in London, U.K., on Saturday, June 25, 2016. The U.K. voted to quit the European Union after more than four decades in a stunning rejection of the continent's postwar political and economic order. Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protestor holding a European Union (EU) flag, addresses a crowd as he demonstrates against the European Union (EU) referendum result, in London, U.K., on Saturday, June 25, 2016. The U.K. voted to quit the European Union after more than four decades in a stunning rejection of the continent's postwar political and economic order. Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protest camp of people calling for a second referendum on Scottish independence, in Edinburgh, Scotland on June 25, 2016, following the pro-Brexit result of the UK's EU referendum vote. The result of Britain's June 23 referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU) has pitted parents against children, cities against rural areas, north against south and university graduates against those with fewer qualifications. London, Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU but Wales and large swathes of England, particularly former industrial hubs in the north with many disaffected workers, backed a Brexit. / AFP / OLI SCARFF (Photo credit should read OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images)
A demonstrator holds a placard that reads 'So Long Great Britain' during a protest against the pro-Brexit outcome of the UK's June 23 referendum on the European Union (EU), in central London on June 25, 2016. The result of Britain's June 23 referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU) has pitted parents against children, cities against rural areas, north against south and university graduates against those with fewer qualifications. London, Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU but Wales and large swathes of England, particularly former industrial hubs in the north with many disaffected workers, backed a Brexit. / AFP / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A demonstrator holds a placard during a protest against the pro-Brexit outcome of the UK's June 23 referendum on the European Union (EU), in central London on June 25, 2016. The result of Britain's June 23 referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU) has pitted parents against children, cities against rural areas, north against south and university graduates against those with fewer qualifications. London, Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU but Wales and large swathes of England, particularly former industrial hubs in the north with many disaffected workers, backed a Brexit. / AFP / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 25: A small group of young people gather to protest on Parliament Square the day after a majority of the British public voted for leaving the European Union on June 25, 2016 in London, England. The ramifications of the historic referendum yesterday that saw the United Kingdom vote to Leave the European Union are still being fully understood. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who is under pressure from within his party to resign has blamed the 'Brexit' vote on 'powerlessness', 'austerity' and peoples fears over the issue of immigration. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 25: A small group of young people gather to protest on Parliament Square the day after a majority of the British public voted for leaving the European Union on June 25, 2016 in London, England. The ramifications of the historic referendum yesterday that saw the United Kingdom vote to Leave the European Union are still being fully understood. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who is under pressure from within his party to resign has blamed the 'Brexit' vote on 'powerlessness', 'austerity' and peoples fears over the issue of immigration. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 25: A small group of people gather to protest on Parliament Square the day after the majority of the British public voted to leave the European Union on June 25, 2016 in London, England. The ramifications of the historic referendum yesterday that saw the United Kingdom vote to Leave the European Union are still being fully understood. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who is under pressure from within his party to resign has blamed the 'Brexit' vote on 'powerlessness', 'austerity' and peoples fears over the issue of immigration. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 25: A small group of young people gather to protest on Parliament Square the day after a majority of the British public voted for leaving the European Union on June 25, 2016 in London, England. The ramifications of the historic referendum yesterday that saw the United Kingdom vote to Leave the European Union are still being fully understood. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who is under pressure from within his party to resign has blamed the 'Brexit' vote on 'powerlessness', 'austerity' and peoples fears over the issue of immigration. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold placards during a protest against the outcome of the UK's June 23 referendum on the European Union (EU), in central London on June 25, 2016. The result of Britain's June 23 referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU) has pitted parents against children, cities against rural areas, north against south and university graduates against those with fewer qualifications. London, Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU but Wales and large swathes of England, particularly former industrial hubs in the north with many disaffected workers, backed a Brexit. / AFP / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 25: A small group of people gather to protest on Parliament Square the day after the majority of the British public voted to leave the European Union on June 25, 2016 in London, England. The ramifications of the historic referendum yesterday that saw the United Kingdom vote to Leave the European Union are still being fully understood. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who is under pressure from within his party to resign has blamed the 'Brexit' vote on 'powerlessness', 'austerity' and peoples fears over the issue of immigration. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND- JUNE 24: Young protesters demonstrate outside Downing Street, following the United Kingdom's decision to leave the EU following the referendum, on June 24, 2016 in London, England. The result from the historic EU referendum has now been declared and the United Kingdom has voted to LEAVE the European Union. (Photo by Mary Turner/Getty Images)
A boat flying a large 'In' flag, campaigning to remain in the EU in the upcoming referendum sails by the British Houses of Parliament to meet a flotilla of boats from the group 'Fishing for Leave' on the river Thames in London on June 15, 2016. A Brexit flotilla of fishing boats sailed up the River Thames into London today with foghorns sounding, in a protest against EU fishing quotas by the campaign for Britain to leave the European Union. / AFP / NIKLAS HALLE'N (Photo credit should read NIKLAS HALLE'N/AFP/Getty Images)
A boat flying a large 'In' flag, campaigning to remain in the EU in the upcoming referendum sails by the British Houses of Parliament to oppose a flotilla of boats from the group 'Fishing for Leave' (L) on the river Thames in London on June 15, 2016. A Brexit flotilla of fishing boats sailed up the River Thames into London today with foghorns sounding, in a protest against EU fishing quotas by the campaign for Britain to leave the European Union. / AFP / NIKLAS HALLE'N (Photo credit should read NIKLAS HALLE'N/AFP/Getty Images)
A boat carrying supporters for a ' remain' vote in the EU referendum including Irish singer Bob Geldof (C) shout and wave at fishing boats supporting a 'leave' vote as they sail on the river Thames in central London on June 15, 2016. A Brexit flotilla of fishing boats sailed up the River Thames into London today with foghorns sounding, in a protest against EU fishing quotas by the campaign for Britain to leave the European Union. / AFP / NIKLAS HALLE'N (Photo credit should read NIKLAS HALLE'N/AFP/Getty Images)
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On June 24, the day after Britain voted to leave the European Union, Priceline Group Inc's Kayak, said it saw a 54 percent increase in U.S. searches exploring fares to the United Kingdom compared to other Fridays in the month of June.

Flight searches from the U.K. for U.S. travel also rose 46 percent, according to Kayak.

"Americans may want to secure a great fare, while British may be worried that higher fares will soon hit the market," said Billy Sanez, vice president of marketing and communications at FareCompare.com, which analyzes airfares, when shown the Kayak data.

Search site Travelzoo saw a 35.3 percent increase in travel searches from the U.S. to the U.K. from June 24 to June 27, and StudentUniverse, a travel booking site popular among young people, saw searches for flights from the U.S. to the U.K double from a year ago. It did not show a change in UK-based searches for U.S. trips.

A number of U.S. travel agents said they expected demand for British travel to emerge, but few had seen it yet.

Darcy Allen of New Hampshire-based boutique travel agency Travel by Darcy said some of her clients were locking down plans.

"They want to take advantage of the lower airfares and are willing to prepay hotels now to lock in the lower (currency) conversion," she said.

More visitors will come to Britain and Europe if the currencies continue to suffer, said George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog.com, a low airfare alert site that covers all airlines. Longer term, if the British economy slows, "everything will be cheaper." (Reporting by Melissa Fares, editing by Peter Henderson and Tom Brown)

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