Clinton regains double-digit lead over Trump -Reuters/Ipsos poll

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What Is Boosting Clinton's Poll Standing?

NEW YORK, June 24 (Reuters) - Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton regained a double-digit lead over Republican rival Donald Trump this week, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Friday.

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The June 20-24 poll showed that 46.6 percent of likely American voters supported Clinton while 33.3 percent supported Trump. Another 20.1 percent said they would support neither candidate.

Trump had enjoyed a brief boost in support following the June 12 mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, as he doubled down on his pledge to ban Muslims from entering the country, cutting Clinton's lead to nine points.

See Clinton on the campaign trail in Brooklyn:

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Hillary Clinton Brooklyn Rally
BROOKLYN, NY - JUNE 7: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters on her way to arrive onstage during a primary night rally at the Duggal Greenhouse in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 7, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Clinton has secured enough delegates and commitments from superdelegates to become the Democratic Party's presumptive presidential nominee. She will become the first woman in U.S. history to secure the presidential nomination of one of the country's two major political parties. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
BROOKLYN, NY - JUNE 7: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters on her way to arrive onstage during a primary night rally at the Duggal Greenhouse in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 7, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Clinton has secured enough delegates and commitments from superdelegates to become the Democratic Party's presumptive presidential nominee. She will become the first woman in U.S. history to secure the presidential nomination of one of the country's two major political parties. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives to speak during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton hugs her husband former President Bill Clinton while speaking during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Supporters gather to hear Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S. June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton acknowledges celebratory cheers from the crowd during her primary night event at the Duggal Greenhouse, Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 7, 2016 in New York. Hillary Clinton hailed a historical 'milestone' for women as she claimed victory over rival Bernie Sanders in the Democratic White House nomination race. 'Thanks to you, we've reached a milestone,' she told cheering supporters at a rally in New York. 'The first time in our nation's history that a woman will be a major party's nominee.' / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stands on stage with husband, former US president Bill Clinton during her primary night event at the Duggal Greenhouse, Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 7, 2016 in New York. Hillary Clinton hailed a historical 'milestone' for women as she claimed victory over rival Bernie Sanders in the Democratic White House nomination race. 'Thanks to you, we've reached a milestone,' she told cheering supporters at a rally in New York. 'The first time in our nation's history that a woman will be a major party's nominee.' / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
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But Trump's rise in popularity appeared to be only temporary, unlike his lasting surge among the Republican field last year after the attacks in Paris and in San Bernardino, California.

Clinton's 13.3 percentage point lead is about the same as she had before the Orlando attack.

Trump's slip this week came as he struggled to show that he can keep up with a Clinton campaign apparatus that has dwarfed his in size and funding.

Campaign finance disclosures released earlier this week showed Trump started June with a war chest of just $1.3 million, a fraction of Clinton's $42 million. Trump sought to ease concerns among his allies by saying that he could tap his "unlimited" personal wealth if needed, and also by bolstering efforts to raise money through fundraising events and online donations.

Meanwhile, Republican leaders including House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker continued to express reservations about their new standard bearer, who has angered some in the party with his fiery rhetoric.

Ryan and Walker both said over the past week that they felt Republicans should follow their "conscience" when deciding to support the party's likely nominee, instead of urging party members to support him.

The poll only captured some of the voter reaction to Britain's decision in Thursday's referendum to exit the European Union, a move that some pundits say suggests Trump's insurgent candidacy has tapped into a broad and powerful anti-globalization wave sweeping Western countries.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online and included interviews with 1,201 likely voters in all 50 states. It has a credibility interval, a measure of accuracy, of 3.3 percentage points.

(Editing by Richard Valdmanis and Leslie Adler)

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