16-year-old homeless student graduates school 2 years early

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Destyni Tyree is 16-year-old teen from D.C. And she's already graduated high school.

That's not to say her shorter-than-normal high school career wasn't eventful. Destyni was a cheerleader, prom queen, and received many accolades and academic awards. She even graduated with a 4.0 GPA.

Oh yeah, and she's homeless.

But in the fall, she'll be heading to West Virginia to attend Potomac State University on a scholarship.

Destyni's pushed herself academically, with the support of her mother and teachers. She took summer and online classes, and her extreme potential was recognized by the school's leadership.

"We not only gave her regular classes, she had online classes and she did Saturday school to make sure that she graduated this year," said Ms. Young, principal of the alternative high school Destyni attended in Northeast D.C.

Life in the family shelter was hard, and so Destyni worked hard to leave it. She explained, "I don't want to live in a shelter when I get older. I want to better my life, so that gave me the drive to do what I want to do."

But she knows the journey won't be easy. To prepare herself, and all of the outside costs not included in her scholarship, Destyni has set up a GoFundMe page.

"I'm scared, I'm excited, I'm proud of myself, all in one big ball," she said.

Scroll through for another inspirational story:

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Blind Massachusetts girl gets special prom
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Blind Massachusetts girl gets special prom
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, dances with her friend Maddy Wilson (R) at the Chelsea High School Prom in Boston, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, and her mother Jennifer (L) pick out a prom dress for Precious at Tammi's Closet in Amesbury, Massachusetts, United States April 17, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, spends time in her bedroom with her cousin Janelly Matos (R) before Precious' prom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez (R), 18, who has been blind since birth, walks to a hair salon with her mother Jennifer in preparation for her prom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 19, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, sits for a pedicure in preparation for her prom at a nail salon in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 19, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, her cousin Janelly Matos (C) and their friend Trista Ward (L) buy candy and snacks at a convenience store before Precious' prom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez (C), 18, who has been blind since birth, gets her hair done by Yubelquis Beato (2nd R), while her brother J.J. (L) plays a video game and her mother Jennifer (R) looks on, in preparation for Precious' prom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 19, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, her cousin Janelly Matos (C) and their friend Trista Ward (L) walk home after buying candy and snacks at a convenience store before Precious' prom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, has her hair done by her aunt Norma Gonzalez (R) as Precious gets dressed for prom at her home in Chelsea, Massachusetts, U.S. May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, gets a kiss from her mother Jennifer at her home in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States before going to prom May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, gets her dress and hair adjusted by her aunt Norma Gonzalez (L) and her mother Jennifer (R) as she prepares for her prom at her home in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, models the prom dress for her mother Jennifer (L) at Tammi's Closet in Amesbury, Massachusetts, United States April 17, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, talks to her father Jonathan (L) as she prepares for prom at her home in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, and her friend Maddy Wilson (L) walk to a car on their way to Precious' prom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, and her friend Maddy Wilson (R) arrive for the Chelsea High School prom in Boston, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, and her friend Maddy Wilson (R) make ice cream sundaes at the Chelsea High School prom in Boston, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, and her friend Maddy Wilson (R) eat ice cream sundaes at the Chelsea High School prom in Boston, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, who has been blind since birth, dances with her friend Maddy Wilson (R) at the Chelsea High School Prom in Boston, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Precious Perez, 18, who has been blind since birth, sits at a table at the Chelsea High School Prom in Boston, Massachusetts, United States May 21, 2016. Precious Perez slipped into her full-length strapless prom gown and said it made her feel like storybook royalty, an experience shared by many of her peers at high schools across the United States. Blind since birth, Perez, could not see the dress's mint green colour, but said that didn't limit her ability to enjoy the formal dance, a common rite of passage for American teens. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "PRECIOUS PEREZ" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
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