Taylor Swift, Paul McCartney among 180 artists signing petition for digital copyright reform

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For the last three months, the music industry has been fighting -- or at least negotiating in public -- with YouTube.

Now, artists are adding their voices.

In an ad that will run Tuesday through Thursday in the Washington DC magazines Politico, The Hill, and Roll Call, 180 performers and songwriters are calling for reform of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which regulates copyright online. A range of big names from every genre signed the ad -- from Taylor Swift to Sir Paul McCartney, Vince Gill to Vince Staples, Carole King to the Kings of Leon -- as did 19 organizations and companies, including the major labels.

Music Industry A-Listers Call on Congress to Reform Copyright Act

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), enacted in 1998, gives services like YouTube "safe harbor" from copyright infringement liability for the actions of their users, as long as they respond to takedown notices from rightsholders. In practice, labels and publishers say, this gives YouTube a negotiating advantage. The big labels and publishers have long had deals with the video service, but they have often said that the DMCA gives it leverage that services like Spotify don't have. In March, the RIAA called this the "value grab." Manager Irving Azoff, who organized the ad, has made DMCA reform a priority, speaking about the issue in February, when he accepted The Recording Academy President's Merit Award at Clive Davis' pre-Grammy Awards gala, and two weeks ago at the National Music Publishers Association annual meeting.

RELATED: See photos of Taylor Swift through the years:

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Taylor Swift through the years
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Taylor Swift through the years
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 15: Recording artist Taylor Swift attends The 58th GRAMMY Awards at Staples Center on February 15, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)
Taylor Swift arrives at the iHeartRadio Music Awards at The Shrine Auditorium on Sunday, March 29, 2015, in Los Angeles. (Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP)
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2014 file photo, Taylor Swift performs in Times Square during New Year's Eve celebrations in New York. Swift, along with Amanda Lambert, Kenny Chesney, George Strait, Garth Brooks, Reba McEntire and Brooks & Dunn will receive a special honor at the Academy of Country Music's 50th awards show on April 19. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 19, 2014 file photo, Taylor Swift arrives at the iHeart Radio Music Festival in Las Vegas. NBC said Friday, Oct. 3, that the singer is serving as a mentor to competitors later this month on "The Voice." Sheâll make her first appearance on Oct. 27 (Photo by Andrew Estey/Invision/AP, File)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 28: Taylor Swift performs during her '1989' World Tour at ANZ Stadium on November 28, 2015 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage)
Taylor Swift poses backstage with the awards for favorite album - country for "Red", favorite female artist - pop/rock, favorite female artist - country, and artist of the year at the American Music Awards at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Singer Taylor Swift performs at Z100's Jingle Ball 2012 presented by Aeropostale at Madison Square Garden on Friday Dec. 7, 2012 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
FILE - This April 1, 2012 file photo shows country singer Taylor Swift at the 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards in Las Vegas. Swift's "The Hunger Games" soundtrack entry "Safe & Sound" with The Civil Wars _ a duo happily adopted by Swift's fan base _ also is nominated for video of the year for the 2012 CMT Awards, which kicks off at 8 p.m. EDT Wednesday, June 6, from Nashville's Bridgestone Arena.. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)
Taylor Swift arrives at the 54th annual Grammy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012 in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
Taylor Swift arrives at the 39th Annual American Music Awards on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011 in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
Taylor Swift arrives at the 38th Annual American Music Awards on Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010 in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
Singer Taylor Swift performs her song "Story of Us", as she kicks off her Speak Now North American tour, Friday, May 27, 2011, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Taylor Swift at the Curb Event Center at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee (Photo by John Shearer/WireImage)
NASHVILLE, TN - NOVEMBER 06: Singer Taylor Swift attends the 40th Annual CMA Awards at the Gaylord Entertainment Center November 6, 2006 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Scott Gries/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN - APRIL 16: Singer Taylor Swift accepts the award for 'Breakthrough Video of the Year' for the song 'Tim McGraw' onstage at the 2007 CMT Music Awards at the Curb Event Center at Belmont University April 16, 2007 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Peter Kramer/Getty Images)
Taylor Swift sings "Picture To Burn" during the CMT Music Awards Monday, April 14, 2008, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Jeff Christensen)
Taylor Swift arrives at "The Grammy Nominations Concert Live" in Los Angeles on Wednesday Dec. 3, 2008. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)
Taylor Swift poses with the award for album of the year and the Crystal Milestone award backstage at the 44th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards in Las Vegas on Sunday, April 5, 2009. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Musician Taylor Swift arrives at the annual Pre-GRAMMY Gala presented by The Recording Academy and Clive Davis on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly, Hills, California. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
Musician Taylor Swift poses for a portrait in West Hollywood, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2010. Swift's new album "Speak Now" will be released on Oct. 25, 2010. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)
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Artists are usually reluctant to get involved in copyright policy debates, but several signed an April 1 petition on the same topic. Like the petition many artists signed in 2012 against the Internet Radio Fairness act, which would have lowered online radio royalties, this represents a rare case in which most of the music business agrees on something.

The major labels are now negotiating new deals with YouTube -- Universal Music Group's contract has already expired, although the companies continue to do business on an ongoing basis. At the same time, the U.S. Copyright Office is conducting a study of the DMCA safe harbors as the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee is reviewing copyright law. This had made the DMCA an urgent issue for labels and publishers, which believe that YouTube's free service makes it harder to convince music consumers to sign up for subscription services like Apple Music and Spotify. As performers and songwriters become more willing to speak out about copyright issues, the famously contentious music business seems to have found an issue it can unite around.

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The DMCA, this week's ad says, "has allowed major tech companies to grow and generate huge profits by creating ease of use for consumers to carry almost every recorded song in history in their pocket via a smartphone, while songwriters' and artists' earnings continue to diminish." It suggests that the DMCA wasn't intended to protect the kind of companies that benefit from it now -- a subject that's been debated by lawyers and policymakers as well -- and asks for "sensible reform that balances the interests of creators with the interests of the companies who exploit music for their financial enrichment."

YouTube has said it gets no advantage from the DMCA, since its Content ID system gives labels a way to remove or monetize their music, and 99.5 percent of music claims involve it as opposed to manual DMCA requests. This implies that Content ID is very effective, but it's hard to know for sure, since no one measures how much music the system doesn't identify. YouTube also points out that it has paid more than $3 billion to the music business, and that much of this revenue is generated by casual music fans who might not subscribe to other services anyway.

However, some online-based artists have been speaking out on behalf of YouTube. After Azoff wrote an open letter to YouTube last month, the video creator Hank Green, who runs the YouTube channel Vlogbrothers, responded with a letter than made the case that the service is good for the music business. On June 15, Green announced that he and other creators were forming The Internet Creators Guild to advocate for professional online creators. The guild will apparently not pressure online platforms for better terms, but it will "unify the voice of online creators to create change." One wonders whether this unified voice could be raised to oppose those of music rightsholders, since Google, which owns YouTube, has sometimes argued that copyright enforcement suppresses online creativity.

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Two other artists have been especially critical of YouTube. Trent Reznor, no stranger to technology given his role at Apple Music, told Billboard on June 13 that YouTube was "built on the backs of free, stolen content." Nikki Sixx' band Sixx:A.M. also wrote a detailed open letter to YouTube, appealing to Larry Page, chief executive of Google's parent company Alphabet, to better compensate musicians. Last week, YouTube responded, in a statement to Music Business Worldwide that said "the voices of the artists are being heard."

Now, it seems, those voices are speaking louder.


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