'Mississippi Burning' case officially closed after 52 years

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'Mississippi Burning' Case Officially Closed After 52 Years

JACKSON, Miss. (WREG) — The case file of the murders of three Civil rights workers in Mississippi has been closed.

That announcement was made at a news conference by Monday morning by Attorney General Jim Hood.

SEE ALSO: Body found in ditch likely missing pregnant teacher, assistant principal arrested

Three civil rights workers were murdered on June 21, 1964, in what was dubbed the Mississippi Burning case.

Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, and James Earl Chaney were taken and murdered in Neshoba County.

The three were working to register more black voters.

See more from this tragic case:

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Mississippi Burning murder case
Investigators locked up the charred station wagon of a missing civil rights trio, Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney, after it was found in a swampy area near Philadelphia, Miss., June 6, 1964. Three civil rights workers, two white and one black, have been missing since Sunday night. They were last seen as they drove this vehicle from Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jack Thornell)
On June 29, 1964, the FBI began distributing these pictures of civil rights workers, from left, Michael Schwerner, 24, of New York, James Chaney, 21, from Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman, 20, of New York, who disappeared near Philadelphia, Miss., June 21, 1964. The three civil rights workers, part of the "Freedom Summer" program, were abducted, killed and buried in an earthen dam in rural Neshoba County. (AP Photo/FBI)
Mrs. Caroline Goodman, center, with Mrs. Fannie Chaney, mother of James E. Chaney, slain civil rights worker, left, and Mrs. Nathan Schwerner, mother of slain Michael Schwerner, are escorted from Ethical Culture Society Hall August 9, 1964, after attending funeral services for her son Andrew Goodman, in New York. Man at right is unidentified. More than 1,200 mourners attended services for Goodman. About 450 persons were outside the hall behind police lines, and another 175 were seated in the hall's basement. (AP Photo)
The burned station wagon of three missing civil rights workers - Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney is found in a swampy area near Philadelphia, Miss., June 24, 1964. Only a shell remains. The tires, windows, interior and exterior are completely burned. Two white and a black civil rights worker were arrested in the station wagon Sunday. They have been unaccounted for since that time. (AP Photo/Jack Thornell)
Congressman John Lewis, D-Ga., right, sings "We Shall Overcome" Tuesday, June 15, 1999, in New York, with family members of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, at a memorial service honoring the three civil rights activists who were killed in 1964 in Greensboro, Miss. Joining Lewis from left are Ben Chaney, brother of James Chaney, Greta and Cassie Schwerner, nieces of Michael Schwerner, and Carolyn Goodman, mother of Andrew Goodman. (AP Photo/Suzanne Plunkett)
Neshoba County Sheriff Lawrence A. Rainey, right, and deputy Cecil Price, center, pass a Meridian policeman en route to court on the third day of their conspiracy trial in the slaying of three civil rights workers in Meridian, Miss., Oct. 11, 1967. At left is Richard Andrew Willis, another of 18 people charged under an 1870 federal law of conspiring to deprive Freedom Summer activists Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner and James Chaney of their civil rights. (AP Photo/Jack Thornell)
Federal and state investigators probe the swampy area near Philadelphia, Miss., where the burned station wagon of the missing civil rights trio was found June 23, 1964. The civil rights workers, Michael Schwerner, 24, Andrew Goodman, 21, both white and James Chaney, 21, black, were last seen in Philadelphia, Miss., Sunday night, June 21, 1964. (AP Photo)
Former Mississippi civil rights activist Lawrence Guyot, now of Washington, gestures at the National Press Club in Washington Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2004, while taking part in a panel discussion to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of civil rights workers James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in Mississippi. (AP Photo/Matthew Cavanaugh)
Attorney Mitch Moran of Carthage, left, and reputed former Klansman Edgar Ray Killen, charged with the 1964 murders of three civil rights workers, listen to instructions given by Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon at the Neshoba County Courthouse in Philadelphia, Miss., Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2005. A March 28 trial date and a $250,000 bond were ordered for Killen, charged with the 1964 murders of James Chaney, a 21-year-old black Mississippian, and two white New Yorkers, Andrew Goodman, 20, and Michael Schwerner, 24. (AP Photo/Neshoba Democrat, Kyle Carter, Pool)
Edgar Ray Killen, left, his wife, Betty Jo Killen, and her son, Jerry Edwards, leave the Neshoba County Courthouse in Philadelphia, Miss, on Thursday, Feb. 24, 2005, after a hearing that changed Killen's trial from March 28 to April 18. Part of the reason for the change, was the state's need for at least four days to present their part of the case. Killen was indicted in January for the murders of civil rights workers James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman. (AP Photo/The Neshoba Democrat, Kyle Carter)
Edgar Ray Killen is sworn in before testifying during a motions hearing inside the Neshoba County Courthouse in Philadelphia, Miss., Friday, March 4, 2004. Killen, a reputed Klansman, is of orchestrating the murders of civil rights workers James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman in rural Neshoba County in 1964. (AP Photo/Kyle Carter, pool)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 24: The scene as people light candles to form the letters into the words, 'So All Can Vote' to support Voting Rights during a vigil on June 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The vigil was a memorial to Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, who were killed in 1964 by the KKK in Mississippi. The vigil included a display of 3,000 candles at the base of the Lincoln Memorial near the reflecting pool. Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice organization sponsored the memorial event on the 50th anniversary of their activist murders. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 24: Luz Minaya (left) Joanne Adams light candles to form the letters into the words, 'So All Can Vote' to support Voting Rights during a vigil on June 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The vigil was a memorial to Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, who were killed in 1964 by the KKK in Mississippi. The vigil included a display of 3,000 candles at the base of the Lincoln Memorial near the reflecting pool. Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice organization sponsored the memorial event on the 50th anniversary of their activist murders. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 24: Rev. Dr. George E. Holmes helps to light candles during a vigil on June 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The vigil was a memorial to Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, who were killed in 1964 by the KKK in Mississippi. The vigil included a display of 3,000 candles at the base of the Lincoln Memorial near the reflecting pool. Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice organization sponsored the memorial event on the 50th anniversary of their activist murders. The candles were formed into the words, 'So All Can Vote to support Voting Rights (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 24: Naureen Singh (left) and and Fiona Lalor, 7,(right) place candles in the shape of an 'O' to form the letters into the words, 'So All Can Vote' to support Voting Rights during a vigil on June 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The vigil was a memorial to Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, who were killed in 1964 by the KKK in Mississippi. The vigil included a display of 3,000 candles at the base of the Lincoln Memorial near the reflecting pool. Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice organization sponsored the memorial event on the 50th anniversary of their activist murders. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 24: The scene with the Washington Monument after people lit candles to form the letters into the words, 'So All Can Vote' to support Voting Rights during a vigil on June 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The vigil was a memorial to Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, who were killed in 1964 by the KKK in Mississippi. The vigil included a display of 3,000 candles at the base of the Lincoln Memorial near the reflecting pool. Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice organization sponsored the memorial event on the 50th anniversary of their activist murders. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 24: A candle with pictures of Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, who were killed in 1964 during 'Freedom Summer ' by the KKK in Mississippi were memorialized in a display of 3,000 candles at the base of the Lincoln Memorial near the reflecting pool on June 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice organization sponsored the memorial event on the 50th anniversary of their activist murders. The candles were formed into the words, 'So All Can Vote to support Voting Rights (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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When they were killed, the three men were in town investigating the burning of an all black church.

Edgar Ray Killen was convicted of manslaughter in 2005 for the deaths.

"There are no individuals living now that we can make a case against," said Hood. "That's not to say if new information comes forward we won't investigate."

In 2014, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded the victims the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

A 1988 movie was made about the case.

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