Best and worst states to retire rich

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The Worst State for Retirement When It Comes to Taxes

Whether you have enough money saved for retirement is a question on the minds of many soon-to-be retirees — and with good reason. A GOBankingRates survey found that 28 percent of baby boomers and seniors (aged 55 and over) don't have any retirement savings, and 17.3 percent have less than $10,000 saved. Depending on where you retire, however, you could maximize how far your retirement income can go, and possibly even help you retire rich. You just need to choose the best state to retire.

To make finding the best state to retire rich easier for you, GOBankingRates surveyed all 50 states and the District of Columbia on these four components:

  • Taxes: state sales tax, state tax on Social Security benefits and property tax
  • Living expenses: average home listing price, median home value and a cost of living index
  • Banking: savings account interest rate and two-year CD account interest rate
  • Health and Social Security: average health insurance premium, average Social Security benefit and Medicare spending per capita

The result: your financial guide to the best and worst states to retire rich. Click through to find out where your state ranks and where you should think about moving if you want to retire wealthy.

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Best and worst states to retire rich
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Best and worst states to retire rich

51. Hawaii

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,302.53
  • Average health insurance premium: $262
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $6,941.74
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.17%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.659%
  • Average home listing price: $865,445

Not only is Hawaii the No. 1 state where you’re most likely to live paycheck to paycheck, but it ranks as the worst state to retire rich due to a number of negative factors. For example, housing prices are a critical issue when deciding where to retire, said David Littell, professor of taxation at The American College of Financial Services — and Hawaii came in with the highest average home listing at $865,445.

This state also ranked the worst for highest cost of living and features the lowest average Medicare payout per person. The good news: Hawaii has the lowest property tax of all 50 states, and there is no state tax on Social Security benefits.

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50. Vermont

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,320.04
  • Average health insurance premium: $468
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,882.76
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.20%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.629%
  • Average home listing price: $285,253

A combination of expensive healthcare, a high cost of living and unfriendly property taxes pull Vermont down to No. 50 in this ranking. Vermont's Medicare spending per capita is less compared to other states, and the state ranks as the second most expensive state for health insurance premiums, behind only Alaska. Plus, Social Security benefits are taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level.

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49. North Dakota

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,228.89
  • Average health insurance premium: $304
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,972.92
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.090%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.507%
  • Average home listing price: $257,624

Social Security in North Dakota pays some of the lowest benefits, and benefits are taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level. Medicare payouts per person are among the lowest as well. These factors, combined with poor savings account interest rates and the second-lowest two-year CD account interest rates, make North Dakota one of the worst states to retire wealthy.

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48. Montana

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,249.74
  • Average health insurance premium: $322
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,082.48
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.053%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.471%
  • Average home listing price: $321,792

The good news for retirees in Montana: There is no state sales tax. The bad news: Montana has low marks for banking interest rates — notably the nation's lowest CD account interest rates — low Social Security benefits that are taxable and low Medicare payouts at just $7,082.48 per person.

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47. New Mexico

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,227.11
  • Average health insurance premium: $183
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,546.88
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.187%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.675%
  • Average home listing price: $240,365

Despite having the cheapest health insurance premiums in the country, New Mexico falls to No. 47, dragged down by low Social Security benefits and low Medicare payouts. New Mexico taxes your Social Security benefits as well, though you can avoid some of this through a retirement income exemption of up to $8,000 per person. The hefty 7.51 percent state sales tax further makes the case for New Mexico as one of the worst states to retire rich.

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46. Alaska

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,259.86
  • Average health insurance premium: $719
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,416.94
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.010%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.919%
  • Average home listing price: $311,329

Alaska is one of the worst states to retire rich when it comes to healthcare costs. Alaska tops the list of most expensive health insurance premiums at $719 while at the same time paying out little in Social Security benefits.

Interestingly, Alaska stands on two extremes when it comes to banking: it has the lowest savings interest rate — tied with Idaho — yet the highest CD account interest rate. But retirees will benefit from the low state sales tax of just 1.78 percent, the lowest rate above zero.

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45. Colorado

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,307.39
  • Average health insurance premium: $279
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,020.22
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.123%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.72%
  • Average home listing price: $507,896

Retiring to Colorado comes with expensive home prices and a high sales tax. The average listing price for a home in Colorado is $507,896, which puts Colorado in fifth place for most expensive listing prices.

The low property tax of 0.61 percent might spare your wallet a little, but you won't get much back in the way of Medicare spending. Colorado also taxes your Social Security benefits — although if you're younger than 65, up to $20,000 can be excluded; if you're 65 and older, up to $24,000 can be excluded.

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44. West Virginia

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,273.43
  • Average health insurance premium: $341
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,260.07
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.103%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.511%
  • Average home listing price: $180,253

What's a shame about West Virginia is the fact that it's one of the best states to buy a home, but not to retire: The average home listing price is just $180,253 and the property tax is only 0.59 percent. What makes West Virginia one of the worst states to retire rich are the low Social Security and Medicare benefits, plus the state tax on Social Security benefits.

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43. Maine

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,226.73
  • Average health insurance premium: $285
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,059.44
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.275%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.653%
  • Average home listing price: $240,420

Relying on Social Security for retirement in Maine could be tough, considering the state has the second-lowest average Social Security benefits. Medicare payouts are on the low end as well at just $8,059.44 per person, and Maine's property tax of 1.28 percent is higher than most states.

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42. Nebraska

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,307.27
  • Average health insurance premium: $313
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,547.83
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.259%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.713%
  • Average home listing price: $224,778

“It’s no surprise that New England typically has higher property tax rates that most of the country, but more surprising is that the Midwest also has high property tax rates,” said Brian Davis, a real estate investing expert and content director of SparkRental.com. Taxes are primarily what drag Nebraska down to one of the worst states to retire rich; the average property tax runs high at 1.84 percent.

Some advantages to retiring in Nebraska: a low cost of living and cheaper home listing prices than the majority of states.

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41. Rhode Island

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,340.63
  • Average health insurance premium: $263
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,698.08
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.317%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.806%
  • Average home listing price: $358,132

Housing prices make Rhode Island less than ideal to retire rich. Rhode Island ranks as the tenth most expensive state in terms of average listing price and eleventh for highest cost of living. Rhode Island also has high property taxes.

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40. South Dakota

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,234.41
  • Average health insurance premium: $309
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,858.84
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.13%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.639%
  • Average home listing price: $258,448

South Dakota might not tax your Social Security benefits, but the average monthly benefit payout is a very low $1,234.41. Medicare spending per person is also low at $7,858.84. Mediocre bank account interest rates and an above-average property tax contribute to South Dakota being one of the worst states to retire rich.

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39. California

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,284.83
  • Average health insurance premium: $245
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,375.77
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.321%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.666%
  • Average home listing price: $649,492

Living expenses across the board hurt California as one of the best states to retire. California has the third highest home listing price at $649,492 and the fourth highest cost of living. However, the low health insurance premium costs and high Medicare spending might offset the 8.48 percent sales tax if you choose to retire in California.

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38. District of Columbia

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,227.95
  • Average health insurance premium: $243
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $11,379.37
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.317%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.819%
  • Average home listing price: $683,165

Inside the Beltway, high home prices and a high cost of living help put District of Columbia toward the bottom of the list of the best states to retire rich.

The average listing price of $683,165 is the second highest in the country, behind only Hawaii. Combined with the second-highest cost of living, these factors undermine some of the D.C.'s better features, such as having one of the lowest average property taxes. One major bonus for those looking to retire to D.C. is the large amount of Medicare spending per person: $11,379.37, the highest in the country.

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37. Minnesota

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,351.05
  • Average health insurance premium: $235
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,446.24
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.13%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.584%
  • Average home listing price: $266,867

Minnesota comes in at No. 37 due to mediocre numbers across the board, but also because of the state tax on Social Security benefits; benefits are taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level.

Minnesota's sales tax and property tax are on the higher end, and this state has some of the lowest CD account interest rates. And, the middle-of-the-pack Medicare spending per capita makes Minnesota not ideal for retiring wealthy.

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36. Oregon

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,323.17
  • Average health insurance premium: $261
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,415.92
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.060%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.573%
  • Average home listing price: $360,326

Oregon boasts zero sales tax, but it has a high cost of living as well as some of the lowest savings and CD account interest rates. But what really hurts Oregon as one of the best states to retire rich is its poor health score, with $7,415.92 of Medicare spending per capita ranking third lowest among the 50 states and D.C.

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35. Missouri

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,300.51
  • Average health insurance premium: $287
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,844.09
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.259%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.638%
  • Average home listing price: $185,533

If you plan on retiring to Missouri, you could benefit from cheap living expenses. The average home listing price is cheaper here, as is the cost of living. Missouri doesn't shine when it comes to its 7.86 state sales tax or the fact that the state can tax Social Security benefits, although only when gross income is over a certain amount.

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34. Utah

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,332.23
  • Average health insurance premium: $244
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,074.87
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.632%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.774%
  • Average home listing price: $453,881

Utah is another place where Social Security benefits get taxed, contributing to state's ranking among the worst states to retire rich. Housing prices, too, could cost retirees: The average listing price is $453,881, putting Utah in the top 10 most expensive states for that category.

But, there is a notable advantage to retiring in Utah: At 0.632 percent, Utah has the highest savings account interest rate of all 50 states.

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33. Arkansas

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,247.96
  • Average health insurance premium: $310
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,062.16
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.052%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.648%
  • Average home listing price: $174,951

Arkansas does not tax your Social Security benefits, but the state has the second-highest sales tax in the country. Medicare spending is on the lower end of the spectrum, and Arkansas ranks ninth lowest in terms of Social Security benefits.

But there are perks to retiring in Arkansas, namely the fact that it has the fourth-lowest average home listing price.

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32. Kansas

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,355.46
  • Average health insurance premium: $248
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,657.73
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.315%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.672%
  • Average home listing price: $160,639

Kansas has both a high sales tax and a high average property tax, but what really hurts this state is the state tax on Social Security benefits, though only for those with a federal adjusted gross income greater than $75,000. Home prices, however, could persuade you to retire to Kansas: At $160,639, Kansas has the second-lowest average listing price, behind only Indiana.

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31. Massachusetts

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,339.41
  • Average health insurance premium: $456.39
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,602.20
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.325%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.825%
  • Average home listing price: $532,304

Where Kansas has some of the cheapest houses, retirees will face high home prices in Massachusetts: the average listing is $532,304. Massachusetts spends $10,602.20 on Medicare per person, more than most states, but not enough to lift Massachusetts higher up on the list of the best states to retire rich.

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30. Connecticut

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,447.29
  • Average health insurance premium: $318
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,999.54
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.105%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.630%
  • Average home listing price: $421,289

Retirement in Connecticut is costly when it comes to taxes. Unless your gross income is under a certain level, Connecticut can tax you Social Security benefits, plus the state has the fourth-highest property tax in the country. On the positive side, however, Connecticut has the second-highest Social Security benefits and fourth highest Medicare spending in the U.S.

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29. Washington

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,371.20
  • Average health insurance premium: $227
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,007.56
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.027%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.650%
  • Average home listing price: $324,028

Washington is a great state to retire rich in terms of healthcare and Social Security. With an average health insurance premium of $227, Washington has the fifth-cheapest premiums in the country as well as high Social Security benefits that aren’t tax by the state.

Home prices, however, in Washington will not help retirees save, nor will abysmal savings interest rates, the third lowest in the country. Tack on a hefty 8.89 percent sales tax, and Washington comes in No. 29 on the best states to retire rich.

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28. New York

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,364.74
  • Average health insurance premium: $369
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,896.66
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.248%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.77%
  • Average home listing price: $454,401

Retirement in New York comes with high Medicare spending per person and high Social Security benefits — but also high health insurance premiums. The problem with retiring to New York are the expensive houses, not to mention some of the highest sales and property taxes in the country. The kicker: New York has the third-highest cost of living.

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27. Idaho

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,284.21
  • Average health insurance premium: $273
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,642.91
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.010%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.733%
  • Average home listing price: $275,707

The cost of living in Idaho is one of its best traits for retirees, having the third-lowest cost of living expense in the country. But, money saved from that won’t get much use in a bank because Idaho has the lowest savings interest rate in the U.S., tied with Alaska. Healthcare costs might also hurt your retirement fund with Idaho ranking the fifth lowest for Medicare spending.

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26. Iowa

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,314.34
  • Average health insurance premium: $284
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,868.87
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.128%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.727%
  • Average home listing price: $175,168

Housing prices in Iowa could help you retire rich with the average listing price of $175,168 being the fifth cheapest in the country. Iowa boasts cheap cost of living expenses and solid interest rates on CD accounts as well. Where Iowa falters is with Medicare, spending just $7,868.87 per person, which ranks in the bottom 10 out of the country.

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25. Wisconsin

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,354.84
  • Average health insurance premium: $326
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,102.28
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.089%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.662%
  • Average home listing price: $213,561

Wisconsin might have more affordable homes than most states, but its heavy average property tax of 1.96 percent could put a damper on retiring there. Add to that a costly average health insurance premium and lower Medicare spending numbers, and Wisconsin comes in at No. 25, straddling the divide between the worst states and the best states to retire rich.

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24. Wyoming

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,328.60
  • Average health insurance premium: $426
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $7,805.82
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.03%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.598%
  • Average home listing price: $269,326

Starting off the second half of the list of the best states to retire rich, Wyoming boasts lower property and sales taxes and a lower-than-average cost of living. What prevents Wyoming from being a better state to retire rich are the low Medicare spending, very unfavorable savings account rates and the fourth-highest health insurance premiums in the country.

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23. North Carolina

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,320.29
  • Average health insurance premium: $409
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,633.42
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.275%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.708%
  • Average home listing price: $284,625

Ranking No. 23, North Carolina scores points as a good state to retire wealthy thanks to lower-than-average property taxes and home prices. Middling scores in the health and Social Security component hurt North Carolina’s chances of ranking higher. Specifically, North Carolina has the fifth-highest average health insurance premium costs in the country.

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22. Kentucky

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,242.81
  • Average health insurance premium: $227
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,688.83
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.078%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.683%
  • Average home listing price: $190,997

Retirees in Kentucky have to take the bad with the good, the good being cheap housing prices and the bad being low Social Security benefits. Kentucky, however, still has plenty of positives for retirees, such as a lower cost of living — the fifth-lowest cost of living in the country. Kentucky also boasts one of the lowest health insurance premiums out of the 50 states and D.C.

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21. Tennessee

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,304.31
  • Average health insurance premium: $281
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,685.64
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.098%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.643%
  • Average home listing price: $236,339

Coming in at No. 21, Tennessee is just above-average when it comes to retiring rich, but does have some notable features, including the highest state sales tax in the U.S. at 9.46 percent. But, Tennessee is also pretty easy on your wallet when it comes to the cost of living and notably income tax.

"Tennessee collects income tax only on your interest and dividend income," said Rick Dwyer, CEO of Wealth Financial Group First Coast.

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20. Nevada

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,313.43
  • Average health insurance premium: $261
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,597.56
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.08%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.616%
  • Average home listing price: $322,917

Nevada has some drawbacks for retirement costs, namely housing prices being higher-than-average. Low savings account and CD account interest rates won’t help retirees save much. Nevada does, however, perform well in Medicare spending and average health insurance premiums that are lower than most states.

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19. Alabama

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,285.68
  • Average health insurance premium: $288
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,458.83
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.10%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.764%
  • Average home listing price: $204,694

Retirement in Alabama has a number of things going for it, especially when it comes to living expenses. The average listing price for houses is lower than the majority of states; also, cheap cost of living expenses can save retirees money. Another advantage is Alabama's 0.43 percent property tax, the lowest rate behind only Hawaii. But, an unfavorable sales tax and lower Social Security benefits cost Alabama a higher spot among the best states to retire rich.

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18. Arizona

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,343.51
  • Average health insurance premium: $207
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,622.82
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.03%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.622%
  • Average home listing price: $317,704

Like Alabama, Arizona has a high sales tax, but that factor doesn't hurt the state too much when it comes to retiring rich. Retirees can benefit from cheap health insurance premiums — Arizona has the third lowest in the nation behind New Mexico and Illinois — and Social Security benefits that beat most states on the list.

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17. Louisiana

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,212.45
  • Average health insurance premium: $332
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,286.79
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.263%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.834%
  • Average home listing price: $223,480

Louisiana would rank higher among the best states to retire rich if it weren't for one, major drawback: Louisiana has the lowest Social Security benefits of all 50 states. On the positive side for retirees, Louisiana has relatively cheap home prices and cost of living expenses. Another advantage is the $10,286.79 of Medicare spending per person.

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16. South Carolina

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,326.43
  • Average health insurance premium: $314
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,585.57
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.083%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.553%
  • Average home listing price: $260,196

South Carolina’s Social Security benefits aren’t the highest, but they’re better than most states and better than Louisiana. Housing prices are on the lower side, and a major boon for retirees who buy a home in South Carolina is the 0.57 percent average property tax, the fifth-lowest in the country.

But if you’re looking to build your savings during retirement, South Carolina offers relatively poor interest rates on savings and CD accounts.

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15. Texas

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,270.87
  • Average health insurance premium: $256
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,572.49
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.241%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.772%
  • Average home listing price: $320,643

Retirement in Texas entails some negative aspects such as high property and sales taxes. Home prices are a bit high in Texas,and the state’s Social Security benefits are near the bottom 20 percentile. What really helps Texas be one of the best states to retire rich is the state’s high spending on Medicare with $10,572.49 per person.

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14. Oklahoma

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,277.14
  • Average health insurance premium: $295
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,005.07
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.238%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.79%
  • Average home listing price: $185,348

Oklahoma comes in at No. 14 as of the best states to retire rich thanks largely to its cheap housing prices, with the average listing price at $185,348. Oklahoma also has the fourth-lowest cost of living. But the state's 8.82 percent sales tax and lower Social Security benefits keep it from ranking higher up among the best states to retire wealthy.

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13. Illinois

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,347.56
  • Average health insurance premium: $198
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,769.70
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.278%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.582%
  • Average home listing price: $249,180

"Illinois is seeing high property taxes increase dramatically in the last year, so it pays to not only learn the current taxes but what tax rate increases are scheduled," said Glenn Phillips, CEO of Lake Homes Reality.

But high Social Security benefits and Medicare spending offset the high sales and property taxes in Illinois. Although home prices are lower than average, perhaps the best biggest boon to retirees’ wallets is the average cost of health premiums: At $198, Illinois has the second-cheapest premium in the country.

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12. New Hampshire

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,393.85
  • Average health insurance premium: $261
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,428.49
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.10%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.75%
  • Average home listing price: $278,336

New Hampshire ranks as the 12th best state to retire rich largely due to having the fifth-highest average Social Security benefits. Lower health insurance premiums and New Hampshire's 0 percent sales tax can help retirees put money back into their wallets. The only downside to retirement in New Hampshire is the 2.15 percent property tax, which is the third highest behind only New Jersey and Illinois.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Jo Ann Snover/Shutterstock.com

11. Virginia

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,336.22
  • Average health insurance premium: $276
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,289.62
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.342%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.761%
  • Average home listing price: $330,773

Property tax and sales tax in Virginia are lower than the majority of states, but the home prices are higher than most: The average listing price is $330,773. Lower Medicare spending per capita might be another drag on retirement, but Virginia is still good enough at rank as the 11th best state to retire rich.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

10. Georgia

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,304.44
  • Average health insurance premium: $254
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $8,944.09
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.300%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.623%
  • Average home listing price: $264,670

Rounding out the top 10 best states to retire rich is Georgia. The state can help retirees save money, thanks to cheap cost of living expenses. Lower CD account interest rates and mediocre Social Security benefits keep Georgia from ranking higher as a state to retire wealthy.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

9. Ohio 

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,300.05
  • Average health insurance premium: $234
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,565.06
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.101%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.597%
  • Average home listing price: $185,335

Cheap housing prices help boost Ohio up to ninth place and be considered one of the best state to retire rich. Homes in Ohio have a low average listing price of $185,335. Retirees in Ohio can also benefit from cheaper health insurance premiums.

Photo credit: Rudy Balasko/Shutterstock.com

8. Mississippi

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,238.83
  • Average health insurance premium: $277
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,447.99
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.140%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.688%
  • Average home listing price: $180,209

If you retire to Mississippi, you'll likely save money on living expenses. The average listing price for a home is just $180,209, but Mississippi scores poor marks for its lower Social Security benefits. But the fact Mississippi has the lowest cost of living helps put the state in the top 10 best states to retire rich.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Pecold/Shutterstock.com

7. Pennsylvania

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,356.68
  • Average health insurance premium: $276
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,692.19
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.246%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.632%
  • Average home listing price: $203,333

Health benefits and favorable housing prices help put Pennsylvania No. 7 on the list of the best states to retire rich. Pennsylvania's average home listing price of $203,333 is cheaper than most states. High Social Security benefits and Medicare spending can also help you retire wealthy in Pennsylvania — and make up for the 1.54 percent property tax.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Jon Bilous/Shutterstock.com

6. New Jersey

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,452.47
  • Average health insurance premium: $330
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $11,203.17
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.367%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.775%
  • Average home listing price: $320,361

New Jersey takes the sixth spot in this ranking due to strong health score numbers. New Jersey notably spends the second most on Medicare benefits per capita at $11,203.17 and pays out the most Social Security benefits at a whopping $1,452.47.

But despite these benefits, New Jersey is experiencing a worrying exodus of retirees, claims Len Hayduchok, president of Dedicated Financial Services. “Twice as many people are moving out of New Jersey than into the state,” he added.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Jon Bilous/Shutterstock.com

5. Florida

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,309.10
  • Average health insurance premium: $262
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,707.92
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.38%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.729%
  • Average home listing price: $354,540

Florida has gained a reputation as a popular place to retire, and probably with good reason. Florida has the sixth-highest Medicare spending per person and second-highest savings account interest rate in the country. Florida's CD account interest rate is also above-average, and its average health insurance premiums are on the cheaper end.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

4. Maryland

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,371.89
  • Average health insurance premium: $249
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $11,044.06
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.073%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.679%
  • Average home listing price: $323,530

Maryland ranks as the fourth best state to retire rich thanks mainly to its health and Social Security numbers, while Medicare spending per person in Maryland is $11,044.06, the third-highest on the list. The state also has a high average Social Security benefits payout. Retirees can also benefit from Maryland's relatively cheap health insurance premiums, too.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / Sean Pavone/Shutterstock.com

3. Indiana

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,379.93
  • Average health insurance premium: $298
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,213.13
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.250%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.534%
  • Average home listing price: $157,435

Indiana is the No. 3 best state to retire rich due in large part to cheap housing prices: The average listing price is the lowest on the list at $157,435. Besides saving money on homes, retirees will benefit from the second-lowest cost of living and some of the highest Social Security benefit payouts in the country.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / f11photo/Shutterstock.com

2. Michigan

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,403.64
  • Average health insurance premium: $226
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $10,064.26
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.086%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.647%
  • Average home listing price: $173,888

Cheap living costs and cheap homes — the average home listing price is $173,888 — help Michigan rank as the No. 2 best state to retire rich. Michigan has the fourth-highest average Social Security benefits and high Medicare payouts per person as well.

One of the few drawbacks of retiring to Michigan is the 1.78 percent average property tax. But, Michigan also has another high tax, one that people often forget to think about, said Littell of The American College of Financial Services. Michigan imposes a heavy 0.75 percent real estate transfer tax.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / iStock.com/Arpad Benedek

1. Delaware

  • Average Social Security benefits: $1,414.34
  • Average health insurance premium: $356
  • Average Medicare spending per capita: $9,904.68
  • Average savings interest rate: 0.350%
  • Average 2-year CD interest rate: 0.542%
  • Average home listing price: $289,375

Delaware tops the list of the best states to retire rich thanks to two components: taxes and healthcare costs.

Delaware has no sales tax, no tax on Social Security benefits and a low average property tax of 0.55 percent. You might not save on buying a house, but Delaware's fourth-highest savings account rate can help grow your retirement nest egg.

In terms of health expenses, Delaware spends $9,904.68 per person in Medicare spending, a higher amount than two-thirds of the country. Even more impressive and crucial for retirees are the monthly Social Security benefits in Delaware. Benefits average $1,414.34, the third highest in the country and a central factor in making Delaware the No.1 best state to retire rich.

Photo credit: Courtesy of GOBankingRates.com / iStock.com/DenisTangneyJr

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Complete Ranking of the Best and Worst States to Retire Rich

Do you live in a state that offers enough financial benefits for retirees? Check out the table below see how your state ranks — and if you should consider moving to one of the best states to retire rich.

Rank
State
State Sales Tax
State Tax on Social Security Benefits
Property Tax
Average Listing Price
Median Home Value
Cost of Living Index
GBR Savings Interest
GBR 2-Year CD Interest
Average Health Insurance Premium
Average Social Security Benefits
Medicare Spending per Capita
TOTAL SCORE
51
Hawaii
4.35%
none
0.28%
$865,445
$557,500
168.6
0.17
0.659
$262.00
$1,302.53
$6,941.74
7.52354
50
Vermont
6.17%
taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level
1.71%
$285,253
$216,500
123.8
0.2
0.629
$468.00
$1,320.04
$7,882.76
7.137243
49
North Dakota
6.82%
taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level
1.11%
$257,624
$202,600
101.2
0.09
0.507
$304.00
$1,228.89
$7,972.92
6.860176
48
Montana
0.00%
taxable; amount may be different than federally taxable amount because Montana taxes some types of income that the federal does not and vice versa
0.86%
$321,792
$189,300
102.7
0.053
0.471
$322.00
$1,249.74
$7,082.48
6.427847
47
New Mexico
7.51%
taxed, but can be included as part of an overall retirement income exemption of up to $8K per person
0.73%
$240,365
$166,400
95.6
0.187
0.675
$183.00
$1,227.11
$7,546.88
6.405398
46
Alaska
1.78%
none
1.18%
$311,329
$268,600
133.5
0.01
0.919
$719.00
$1,259.86
$8,416.94
6.385461
45
Colorado
7.52%
younger than 65, up to $20K can be excluded; 65 and older, up to $24K can be excluded
0.61%
$507,896
$302,200
101.9
0.123
0.72
$279.00
$1,307.39
$8,020.22
6.319697
44
West Virginia
6.20%
taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level
0.59%
$180,253
$96,600
103.7
0.103
0.511
$341.00
$1,273.43
$8,260.07
5.942801
43
Maine
5.50%
none
1.28%
$240,420
$177,578
114.7
0.275
0.653
$285.00
$1,226.73
$8,059.44
5.855244
42
Nebraska
6.87%
taxpayer can subtract SS income included in federal AGI if AGI is less than or equal to $58K for married couples filing jointly or $43K for other filers
1.84%
$224,778
$142,300
92.3
0.259
0.713
$313.00
$1,307.27
$8,547.83
5.81396
41
Rhode Island
7.00%
RI does not tax for single filers w/ up to $80K in AGI and married filers w/ up to $100K in AGI
1.67%
$358,132
$233,600
123.3
0.317
0.806
$263.00
$1,340.63
$9,698.08
5.797576
40
South Dakota
5.84%
none
1.32%
$258,448
$164,000
102.5
0.13
0.639
$309.00
$1,234.41
$7,858.84
5.77155
39
California
8.48%
none
0.81%
$649,492
$463,600
134.3
0.321
0.666
$245.00
$1,284.83
$10,375.77
5.666063
38
District of Columbia
5.75%
none
0.57%
$683,165
$498,200
146.8
0.317
0.819
$243.00
$1,227.95
$11,379.37
5.576164
37
Minnesota
7.27%
taxed to the extent they are taxed at the federal level
1.19%
$266,867
$190,000
101.5
0.13
0.584
$235.00
$1,351.05
$8,446.24
5.53334
36
Oregon
0.00%
none
1.09%
$360,326
$274,500
129.5
0.06
0.573
$261.00
$1,323.17
$7,415.92
5.378181
35
Missouri
7.86%
not taxed for single taxpayers w/ AGI less than $85K and married couples w/ AGI less than $100K
1.02%
$185,533
$134,900
91.5
0.259
0.638
$287.00
$1,300.51
$8,844.09
5.362012
34
Utah
6.69%
benefits taxed; may qualify for retirement-income tax credit
0.68%
$453,881
$227,200
92.4
0.632
0.774
$244.00
$1,332.23
$8,074.87
5.352848
33
Arkansas
9.30%
none
0.62%
$174,951
$116,500
91.4
0.052
0.648
$310.00
$1,247.96
$8,062.16
5.197333
32
Kansas
8.60%
exempt from Kansas income tax for residents w/ federal AGI of $75K or less
1.39%
$160,639
$123,100
90.9
0.315
0.672
$248.00
$1,355.46
$8,657.73
5.066309
31
Massachusetts
6.25%
none
1.21%
$532,304
$344,700
130.4
0.325
0.825
$456.39
$1,339.41
$10,602.20
4.982097
30
Connecticut
6.35%
exempt for individual taxpayers w/ federal adjusted gross income less than $50K and married taxpayers filing jointly w/ federal AGI less than $60K
1.98%
$421,289
$236,200
131.8
0.105
0.63
$318.00
$1,447.29
$10,999.54
4.979006
29
Washington
8.89%
none
1.09%
$324,028
$296,500
106
0.027
0.65
$227.00
$1,371.20
$8,007.56
4.978202
28
New York
8.49%
none
1.64%
$454,401
$262,600
135.6
0.248
0.77
$369.00
$1,364.74
$10,896.66
4.901731
27
Idaho
6.03%
none
0.75%
$275,707
$175,400
88.2
0.01
0.733
$273.00
$1,284.21
$7,642.91
4.83184
26
Iowa
6.79%
none
1.49%
$175,168
$132,900
92
0.128
0.727
$284.00
$1,314.34
$7,868.87
4.789315
25
Wisconsin
5.41%
none
1.96%
$213,561
$155,600
98.1
0.089
0.662
$326.00
$1,354.84
$8,102.28
4.777097
24
Wyoming
5.42%
none
0.61%
$269,326
$193,800
92.8
0.03
0.598
$426.00
$1,328.60
$7,805.82
4.729093
23
North Carolina
6.90%
none
0.85%
$284,625
$151,100
95.8
0.275
0.708
$409.00
$1,320.29
$8,633.42
4.550421
22
Kentucky
6.00%
none
0.85%
$190,997
$129,400
90
0.078
0.683
$227.00
$1,242.81
$8,688.83
4.537447
21
Tennessee
9.46%
none
0.75%
$236,339
$132,100
90.3
0.098
0.643
$281.00
$1,304.31
$8,685.64
4.533566
20
Nevada
7.98%
none
0.86%
$322,917
$218,400
106.5
0.08
0.616
$261.00
$1,313.43
$9,597.56
4.523962
19
Alabama
8.97%
none
0.43%
$204,694
$123,300
90.2
0.1
0.764
$288.00
$1,285.68
$8,458.83
4.475022
18
Arizona
8.25%
none
0.80%
$317,704
$207,000
98.8
0.03
0.622
$207.00
$1,343.51
$8,622.82
4.427975
17
Louisiana
9.00%
none
0.51%
$223,480
$147,899
93.4
0.263
0.834
$332.00
$1,212.45
$10,286.79
4.408506
16
South Carolina
7.22%
none
0.57%
$260,196
$137,100
97.5
0.083
0.553
$314.00
$1,326.43
$8,585.57
4.397986
15
Texas
8.17%
none
1.90%
$320,643
$155,400
92.6
0.241
0.772
$256.00
$1,270.87
$10,572.49
4.395333
14
Oklahoma
8.82%
none
0.86%
$185,348
$113,900
89.7
0.238
0.79
$295.00
$1,277.14
$9,005.07
4.382783
13
Illinois
8.64%
none
2.32%
$249,180
$160,300
96.5
0.278
0.582
$198.00
$1,347.56
$9,769.70
4.346795
12
New Hampshire
0.00%
none
2.15%
$278,336
$227,800
118.2
0.1
0.75
$261.00
$1,393.85
$8,428.49
4.29087
11
Virginia
5.63%
none
0.78%
$330,773
$233,800
94.5
0.342
0.761
$276.00
$1,336.22
$8,289.62
4.224551
10
Georgia
7.01%
none
0.95%
$264,670
$145,900
91.7
0.3
0.623
$254.00
$1,304.44
$8,944.09
4.219738
9
Ohio
7.14%
none
1.55%
$185,335
$120,000
92.5
0.101
0.597
$234.00
$1,300.05
$9,565.06
4.211796
8
Mississippi
7.07%
none
0.80%
$180,209
$115,400
83.5
0.14
0.688
$277.00
$1,238.83
$9,447.99
4.200191
7
Pennsylvania
6.34%
none
1.54%
$203,333
$153,600
103
0.246
0.632
$276.00
$1,356.68
$9,692.19
3.902441
6
New Jersey
6.97%
none
2.38%
$320,361
$289,200
125.6
0.367
0.775
$330.00
$1,452.47
$11,203.17
3.705415
5
Florida
6.66%
none
1.06%
$354,540
$187,200
100.5
0.38
0.729
$262.00
$1,309.10
$10,707.92
3.703413
4
Maryland
6.00%
none
1.10%
$323,530
$255,000
121.1
0.073
0.679
$249.00
$1,371.89
$11,044.06
3.618791
3
Indiana
7.00%
none
0.86%
$157,435
$116,000
88
0.25
0.534
$298.00
$1,379.93
$9,213.13
3.306638
2
Michigan
6.00%
none
1.78%
$173,888
$123,000
91.2
0.086
0.647
$226.00
$1,403.64
$10,064.26
3.03235
1
Delaware
0.00%
none
0.55%
$289,375
$210,800
102.8
0.35
0.542
$356.00
$1,414.34
$9,904.68
2.520997

Methodology: GOBankingRates ranked these states based on the results of original research and analysis of costs affecting retirees. This cost analysis was based on four types of factors affecting retirees: taxes, living expenses, banking, and healthcare and Social Security. These four types of factors were broken down as into sets of data points.

For taxes, (1) state sales tax rates, sourced from The Tax Foundation; (2) property tax rates, sourced from The Tax Foundation; (3) state tax on Social Security benefits, which was weighted twice as much as other tax factors, sourced from Kiplinger. Three factors were included among living expenses category: (1) average listing price, sourced from Trulia the week of May 11, 2016; (2) median home value, sourced from Zillow's April 2016 data; (3) cost of living index, sourced from MissouriEconomy.org, which was weighted twice as much as average listing price and four times as much as median home value. Two data points were included in the banking category: (1) savings account interest rates, sourced from GOBankingRates' database; (2) 2-year CD account interest rates, sourced from GOBankingRates' database, with both data points weighted one-quarter. The health and Social Security category included three data points: (1) average health insurance premium, sourced from the Kaiser Family Foundation; (2) average Social Security benefits, sourced from the Social Security Administration; and (3) Medicare spending per capita, sourced from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: Best and Worst States to Retire Rich

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Average retirement age in every state
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Average retirement age in every state

Alabama - Age 62

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Alaska - Age 65

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Arizona - Age 63

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Arkansas - Age 62

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California - Age 64

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Colorado - Age 64

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Delaware - Age 62

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Connecticut - Age 64

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Florida - Age 63

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Georgia - Age 62

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Hawaii - Age 63

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Idaho - Age 63

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Illinois - Age 63

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Indiana - Age 63

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Iowa - Age 64

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Kansas - Age 65

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Kentucky - Age 62

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Louisiana - Age 63

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Maine - Age 64

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Maryland - Age 64

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Massachusetts - Age 64

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Michigan - Age 62

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Minnesota - Age 63

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Mississippi - Age 63

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Missouri - Age 63

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Montana - Age 63

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Nebraska - Age 65

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Nevada - Age 63

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New Hampshire - Age 65

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New Jersey - Age 65

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New Mexico - Age 63

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New York - Age 64

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North Carolina - Age 63

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North Dakota - Age 63

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Ohio - Age 63

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Oklahoma - Age 63

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Oregon - Age 63

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Pennsylvania - Age 63

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Rhode Island - Age 64

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South Carolina - Age 62

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South Dakota - Age 63

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Tennessee - Age 63

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Texas - Age 64

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Utah - Age 65

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Vermont - Age 65

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Virginia - Age 63

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Washington - Age 64

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West Virginia - Age 62

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Wisconsin - Age 63

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Wyoming - Age 65

Via Smart Asset

Photo: Getty

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