British astronaut Tim Peake, 2 others back on Earth after 186 days in space

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            	British Astronaut Tim Peake returns to Earth

Three space explorers, including the European Space Agency's first British astronaut on the International Space Station, are back on Earth after spending 186 days living and working in space.

British astronaut Tim Peake, NASA's Tim Kopra and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko landed in a remote part of Kazakhstan on Saturday morning at 10:15 a.m. BST after undocking from the Space Station and speeding back home.

SEE ALSO: 19 stunning aerial photos of the Earth from Tim Peake's space mission

The three crewmembers came back to Earth tucked inside a Russian Soyuz spacecraft designed to withstand the intense heat created when coming back into the planet's atmosphere.

In all, it took about six hours to get back to Earth from the time the three men left the Space Station.

Peake, Kopra and Malenchenko launched to orbit in December 2015, and in that time, they have performed hundreds of experiments and taken hundreds of pictures of Earth from orbit. (Peake also ran a marathon while in space.)

RELATED: The International Space Station in photos

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International Space Station
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo provided by NASA, an ISS Progress resupply vehicle approaches the International Space Station. On Wednesday, April 29, 2015, NASA and the Russian Space Agency declared a total loss on an unmanned Progress capsule, carrying 3 tons of goods to the station. The spacecraft began tumbling when it reached orbit Tuesday, following launch from Kazakhstan, and flight controllers were unable to bring it under control. (NASA via AP)
The Canadarm 2 reaches out to capture the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft and prepare it to be pulled into its port on the International Space Station Friday April 17, 2015. The Canadarm2 robotic arm will maneuver Dragon to its installation position at the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module where it will reside for the next five weeks. (AP Photo/NASA)
U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, crew member of the mission to the International Space Station, ISS, gestures prior the launch of Soyuz-FG rocket at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, March 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
In this image from NASA television astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore, left, and Terry Virts begin wiring the International Space Station in preparation for the arrival in July of the international docking port for the Boeing and Space-X commercial crew vehicles early Saturday morning Feb. 21, 2015 to (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
In this image from NASA television astronaut Terry Virts installs an antenna and boom during the third spacewalk outside the International Space Station Sunday March 1, 2015. American astronauts Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore had 400 more feet of power and data cable, as well as two antennas, to install Sunday. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
Russian Space Agency experts help U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, crew member of the mission to the International Space Station, ISS, to stand up after inspecting his space suit prior the launch of Soyuz-FG rocket at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, March 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
The Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. SpaceX is on a resupply mission to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-15M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Terry Virts, Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov and Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
FILE- In this Nov. 23, 2014, file photo, U.S. astronaut Terry Virts, left, Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, center and Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, crew members of the mission to the International Space Station, walk to the rocket prior to the launch of Soyuz-FG rocket at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Astronauts hurriedly evacuated the U.S. section of the International Space Station and moved to its Russian module after a problem emerged Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, but Russian and U.S. officials insisted all six crew were not in any danger. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, Pool, File)
U.S. astronaut Barry Wilmore, member of the next mission to the International Space Station, attends a news conference at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. U.S. astronaut Barry Wilmore, and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova are the next crew scheduled to travel to the International Space Station on September 26. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
IN SPACE - OCTOBER 7: (EDITORIAL USE ONLY) In this handout photo provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst takes a photo during his spacewalk, whilst aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on October 7, 2014 in Space. Gerst returned to earth on November 10, 2014 after spending six months on the International Space Station completing an extensive scientific programme, known as the 'Blue Dot' mission (after astronomer Carl Sagan's description of Earth, as seen on a photograph taken by the Voyager probe from six billion kilometres away). (Photo by Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images)
ZHEZKAZGAN, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 12: (Alternate crop of #465931716) In this handout provided by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is seen as it lands with Expedition 42 commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos March 12, 2015 near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan. NASA astronaut Wilmore and Russian cosmonauts Samokutyaev and Serova are returning after nearly six months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 41 and 42 crews. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
STAR CITY, RUSSIA - MARCH 5: In this handout from the In this handout from National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA, (L to R) NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly is seen inside a Soyuz simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) March 5, 2015 in Star City, Russia. The three are preparing for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 28, 2015. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by /Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
WALLOPS ISLAND, VA - OCTOBER 28: In this handout provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket, with the Cygnus spacecraft onboard suffers a catastrophic anomaly moments after launch from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport Pad 0A at NASA Wallops Flight Facility on October 28, 2014 on Wallops Island, Virginia. William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate and Michael Suffredini, NASA's International Space Station Program Manager also participated in the press conference via phone. Cygnus was on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The Antares rocket lifted off to start its third resupply mission to the International Space Station, but suffered a catastrophic anomaly shortly after lift off at 6:22 p.m. EDT. (Photo by Joel Kowsky/NASA via Getty Images)
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Kopra and Peake also tweeted... a lot.

Once on the ground, crewmembers go through a battery of medical and physical exams to see how they're adjusting to being in a gravity environment for the first time in about half a year.

And it's probably going to be quite an adjustment coming back to Earth. On the station, astronauts and cosmonauts see about 16 sunrises and sunsets per day, and float around in the weightlessness of the orbiting outpost.

The three crewmembers left three other colleagues behind on the Space Station.

NASA's Jeff Williams and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexey Ovchinin are holding down the fort on the orbiting space laboratory until three new crewmembers fly up to get the station running at full steam again on July 6.

On a different note, now that Peake's on the ground, he can probably order that pizza Papa John's promised him.

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