In Manila crime rises as police struggle for funds

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Bicycle cabs are parked in front of a police station in Tondo city, metro Manila, Philippines June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
People queue as they are interviewed by town volunteers while members of the Philippine National Police stand guard during the "Rid the streets Of Drinkers and Youth" operation in Las Pinas city, metro Manila, Philippines June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Members of the Philippine National Police Special Reactions Unit aims their pistols at a target range during an agility test inside a police station in metro Manila, Philippines May 21, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Members of the Philippine National Police inspect documents at a checkpoint on a main street of Tondo city, metro Manila, Philippines June 10, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Members of the Philippine National Police Special Reaction Unit gather as part of a police visibility operation along a main road in Metro Manila, Philippines June 4, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A member of the Philippine National Police uses a megaphone to advise residents of their operation, "Rid the Streets of Drinkers and Youth" during a foot patrol along a main street of Las Pinas city, south of Manila, Philippines June 10, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Members of the Philippine National Police stand at attention before operation "Rid the Streets Of Drinkers and Youth" in Las Pinas city, metro Manila, Philippines June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A member of the Philippine National Police supervises detained men doing push-ups part of the "Rid the Streets of Drinkers and Youth" operation in Las Pinas city, metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A member of the Philippine National Police stands guard as he detains people as part of the "Rid the Streets Of Drinkers and Youth" operation on a main road in Las Pinas city, metro Manila, Philippines June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Youths cover their faces at a police station during the "Rid the Streets of Drinkers and Youth" operation in Las Pinas city, metro Manila, Philippines June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A agent of the National Bureau of Investigation searches for evidence during a raid at the home of a police officer and member of the drugs unit, in metro Manila, Philippines May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A member of the National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) drug unit covers his face as he is detained for allegedly reselling seized drugs in metro Manila, Philippines May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A bag of a methamphetamine, known as shabu, is shown by a National Bureau of Investigation agent after a raid on the home of a police officer and member of the anti-drugs unit in metro Manila, Philippines May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Members of the National Bureau of Investigation count cash found in the home of a police officer and member of the drugs unit, during a raid in metro Manila, Philippines May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
A National Bureau of Investigation agent uses a metal grinder to open a vault that contained drugs and around 7 million pesos in cash during a raid at the home of a police officer and member of the drugs unit in metro Manila, Philippines May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
An agent of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency stands guard in front of chemicals used in the productions of methamphetamine hydrochloride, or Shabu, during the destructions of chemicals and other evidence in Valenzuela city, north of Manila, Philippines May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Philippine National Police Scene of the Crime Operations officers inspect 10 kilograms of methamphetamine, known as Shabu, worth around 50 million pesos, found in an abandoned vehicle on a bridge in metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
Laboratory equipment used in the productions of methamphetamine hydrochloride or Shabu is seen during a Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency destruction of chemicals and other evidence in Valenzuela city, north of Manila, Philippines May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco 
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MANILA, June 17 (Reuters) - For Manila's struggling police, the June 30 inauguration of Philippines President-elect Rodrigo Duterte cannot come soon enough.

Duterte, known as "Duterte Harry" for his tough stand on crime, swept to election victory last month on a single policy campaign - wiping out crime in six months by killing criminals, improving policing and increasing pay in the forces.

That was welcome news to police in the Philippine capital who say they are so under-funded that they often have to buy their own bullets and get lifts to murder scenes in funeral service cars because they have no vehicles of their own.

Dhondie Bayaban, inspector of the Philippine National Police (PNP), said the police had recently received a base pay rise to 14,000 pesos ($300) a month but welcomed Duterte's pledge of further salary increases.

"It's not that low, but not enough either to sustain a family," the 41-year-old told Reuters.

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As the police struggle for funds, reported crimes in the Philippines have more than doubled over the last five years to 675,816 last year, according to national police data.

About half of those are deemed serious, but police say the rise can be attributed to increased reporting of offenses.

Reported rape cases have jumped 120 percent over the same five-year period, while drug-fueled crime is also on the rise.

In 2012, the United Nations said the Philippines had the highest rate of methamphetamine use in East Asia, with the U.S. State Department adding that 2.1 percent of Filipinos aged 16 to 64 were using the drug.

With low pay and pressured work, many officers had left the police force, according to Aurea Jane Manalaysay of the PNP Special Reaction Unit.

The 26-year-old single mother was considering emigrating before Duterte, 71, was voted in as the 16th president.

Her hopes are fueled by Duterte's success in tackling crime in Davao, the once-lawless city in the south, where Duterte was mayor for 22 years and where hundreds of criminals were killed in execution-style encounters.

Human rights groups have documented at least 1,400 killings in Davao since 1998 that they say were carried out by death squads.

Duterte, who has vowed to bring back the death penalty, has denied any involvement in the murders but repeatedly condoned them.

During the election campaign, he promised the fish in Manila Bay would grow fat on the bodies "pushers, hold-up men and do-nothings" dumped there.

Manalaysay said she welcomed the help in tackling crime.

"I'm in favor of the death squad because the number of bad people doesn't decrease," she said.

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