The longest filibusters: where does Chris Murphy stack up?

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Sen. Chris Murphy catapulted into the history books early Thursday with his nearly 15-hour filibuster. The marathon address was the 9th-longest since 1900, when the Senate began keeping precise records. Here's a look at the other historic appearances.

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24 Hours, 18 Minutes — Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina set the current record in 1957 in an attempt to stall passage of the Civil Rights Act. He reportedly read from historical documents to pass the time.

23 hours, 30 minutes — New York's Alfonse D'Amato came in just shy of the 24-hour mark in his 1986 speech on a military-funding bill.

22 hours, 26 minutes — Wayne Morse of Oregon broke the then-record for longest Senate speech in his 1953 address on a Tidelands oil bill.

21 hours, 18 minutes, 59 seconds: Ted Cruz's filibuster-like speech in 2013 to protest the Affordable Care Act saw the Texas senator take to reading bedtime stories.

Senator Leads Filibuster-Like Debate Over Gun Control

18 hours, 23 minutes — Wisconsin's Robert La Follette Sr. took the floor over a 1908 currency bill and pushed on for hours despite falling victim to a bad glass of eggnog.

16 hours, 12 minutes — His objection to allowing the national debt to go over $1 trillion saw Wisconsin's Sen. William Proxmire launch an overnight filibuster in 1981.

15 hours, 30 Minutes — Sen. Huey Long of Louisiana read and analyzed each section of the Constitution then gave out recipes in his marathon attempt to retain a provision about National Recovery Administration hiring on June 1935.

15 hours, 14 minutes — Sen. D'Amato spent all day on a "gentleman's filibuster" in 1992 in support of an amendment to a tax bill.

14 hours, 50 minutes — Connecticut's Sen. Murphy said rehabilitation from a back injury had helped him build up his endurance for the filibuster on gun-control measures.

14 hours, 13 minutes — West Virginia's Robert Byrd went down in history when he finished his address about the civil rights act on the morning of June 10, 1964.

RELATED: Chris Murphy's filibuster

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2016 senate filibuster for gun control
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2016 senate filibuster for gun control
This frame grab provided by C-SPAN shows Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn. speaking on the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 15, 2016, where he launched a filibuster demanding a vote on gun control measures. The move comes three days after people were killed in a mass shooting in Orlando. (Senate Television via AP)
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R, obscured) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) collects himself as members of his staff catch up with him in the halls after he ended a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (L) speak to staff members after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Spencer Davis (L), an intern for U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX), greets Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) as he departs the Senate floor to thank him for his work with fellow senators on a filibuster to put pressure on legislators to move on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. Davis said he was moved to meet Booker because he had a relative killed in an infamous 1966 shooting spree from a tower at the University of Texas. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (center L) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (center R) depart the Senate floor directly after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R) speak to aides directly after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 15: Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) leaves in an elevator after assisting Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) in waging an almost 15-hour filibuster on the Senate floor in order to force a vote on gun control on June 15, 2016 in Washington, DC. Murphy wants the Senate to vote on a measure banning anyone on the no-fly list from purchasing a weapon. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
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