Thai man almost loses home to monster monitor lizard

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Gigantic monitor lizard tries to get in a house in Thailand

What do you do when you witness your house being broken into by a freakishly huge monitor lizard? Record the whole incident down of course.

Attanai Thaiyuanwong was in for a rude surprise on Sunday when he arrived back at his home in Nonthaburi, Thailand, to find an unwelcome visitor trying to get into his house.

The intruder was a giant monitor lizard, that looked as tall as an adult human, was standing upright on its hind legs with its mouth around the door knob.

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In Thai tradition, monitor lizards are believed to bring good fortune to those who encounter them. Known as "Tua Ngern Tua Thong", Thais also call the reptiles "Hia!" which apparently means "F**k!".

Thaiyuanwong also posted a video on his Facebook which documented how he and his family tried to handle the situation.

According to a translation by Coconuts Bangkok, a man can be heard shouting in Thai, "Hia is in our house. It's f**king huge!", while a dog barked in the background.

A woman then said: "They say if you throw a coin at it, it will go away!"

The group continued to debate off-camera on what to do until the giant reptile wagged its tail, and everyone screamed.

Later, an unidentified man was seen trying to lure the lizard away with some rope.

See more photos of monitor lizards :

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ROME, ITALY - MAY 15: A three-year-old Komodo Dragon from Los Angeles zoo sits in the new area dedicated to Komodo Dragons at the Bioparco zoo on May 15, 2014 in Rome, Italy. The Komodo Dragon is a venomous reptile which can reach as big as 90 kilos in weight and 3 meters in length. (Photo by Giorgio Cosulich/Getty Images)
Komodo dragons ,Komodo Island, Indonesia
ZAMBIA - 2014/06/17: A monitor lizard is climbing a tree in South Luangwa National Park in eastern Zambia. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 08: . As part of ZSL London Zoo?s extensive enrichment programme, Raja, a 15-year-old Komodo dragon, has been given brightly coloured boomer balls filled with his favourite foods, which the 55kg (nine stone) endangered monitor lizard has to push around with his nose to reach the treats inside.  at London Zoo on August 8, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/UK Press via Getty Images)
Two Komodo dragons are pictured in an enclosure at the Surabaya Zoo on June 2, 2014. A different Komodo dragon died on June 2 at the Indonesian zoo infamous for hundreds of animal deaths in recent years, an official said. It was the second of the creatures -- which are the world's largest living lizards and have a venomous bite -- to die this year at Surabaya Zoo, Indonesia's largest, on the main island of Java. AFP PHOTO / JUNI KRISWANTO (Photo credit should read JUNI KRISWANTO/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken on December 3, 2010, a Komodo dragon looks for prey in the wilds in Rinca island, the natural habitat of the world's largest lizard. Indonesia has declared the islands a national park in 1980 to protect the the komodo dragons. The islands of Komodo and Rinca and surrounding smaller islands comprises Komodo National Park that is located in East Nusa Tenggara province. Park authorities estimate about 2,700 Komodo dragons live in the nature reserve that has been declared UNESCO 'World Heritage Site.' The carnivorous lizards, feeding on water buffalos, deers and wild boars, can grow three meters in length and weigh more than 150 kilograms, has known to have existed in this few islands for millions of years. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
A view of a young Komodo dragon Ivan, one of two males Komodo dragons at the Bioparco zoo in Rome, on May 15, 2014. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
KOMODO ISLAND, INDONESIA - UNDATED: EXCLUSIVE. A Komodo dragon rests on a warm rock on Komodo Island in the Republic of Indonesia. Keeping at arms length, these photographers were able to get up close and personal with these spectacular ten foot-long Komodo dragons. Using a clever 'KomodoCam', a digital camera on wheels fixed to a six foot-long monopod, brothers William and Matthew Burrard-Lucas could be sure that they were the only ones snapping away. The dragons are dominant predators on the Indonesian Komodo islands. Known to eat deer, pigs, water buffalo and occasionally humans, Komodo dragons are even cannibals - larger dragons will eat smaller ones they encounter. Until they were discovered by Europeans 100 years ago they were widely thought to be nothing more than the legends of native people. Scientists believe there are between 4,000 and 5,000 Komodo dragons alive in the wild - a fraction of the population 50 years ago. To combat this decline the Komodo National Park was established in 1980. Now Komodo dragons are protected on the islands of Komodo, Rinca and Padar. (Photo by Burrard - Lucas / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
In this photograph taken on December 2, 2010 a Komodo dragon prowls the shore of Komodo island, the natural habitat of the world's largest lizard. Indonesia has declared the islands a national park in 1980 to protect the the Komodo dragons. The islands of Komodo and Rinca and surrounding smaller islands comprises Komodo National Park that is located in East Nusa Tenggara province. Park authorities estimate about 2,700 Komodo dragons live in the nature reserve that has been declared UNESCO 'World Heritage Site.' The carnivorous lizards, feeding on water buffalos, deers and wild boars, can grow three meters in length and weigh more than 150 kilograms, has known to have existed in this few islands for millions of years. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
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It remains unclear if the monitor lizard was successfully removed, but seeing as Thaiyuanwong has been updating his Facebook page, we're assuming he's unharmed and the lizard returned to where it came from.

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