Cockpit voice recorder from crashed EgyptAir flight found damaged in sea

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EgyptAir Flight 804 Cockpit Voice Recorder Found

CAIRO (Reuters) - The cockpit voice recorder from crashed EgyptAir flight MS804 has been found by search teams who were forced to salvage the device over several stages as it was damaged, the Egyptian investigation committee said on Thursday.

A specialist vessel owned by Mauritius-based Deep Ocean Search had, however, been able to recover the memory unit, it said in a statement.

RELATED: See images of the wreckage recently recovered

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Photos believed to be EgyptAir Flight 804 wreckage are released (5/21)
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Photos believed to be EgyptAir Flight 804 wreckage are released (5/21)
ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT - MAY 21: Some of the passengers' belongings and parts of the wreck of EgyptAir flight MS804 are seen as more wreckage found north of Alexandria, in Egypt on May 21, 2016. EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed with 56 passengers and 10 crew on board on May 19. (Photo by Egyptian Armed Forces / Handout /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT - MAY 21: Some of the passengers' belongings and parts of the wreck of EgyptAir flight MS804 are seen as more wreckage found north of Alexandria, in Egypt on May 21, 2016. EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed with 56 passengers and 10 crew on board on May 19. (Photo by Egyptian Armed Forces / Handout /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT - MAY 21: Some of the passengers' belongings and parts of the wreck of EgyptAir flight MS804 are seen as more wreckage found north of Alexandria, in Egypt on May 21, 2016. EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed with 56 passengers and 10 crew on board on May 19. (Photo by Egyptian Armed Forces / Handout /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT - MAY 21: Some of the passengers' belongings and parts of the wreck of EgyptAir flight MS804 are seen as more wreckage found north of Alexandria, in Egypt on May 21, 2016. EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed with 56 passengers and 10 crew on board on May 19. (Photo by Egyptian Armed Forces / Handout /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT - MAY 21: Some of the passengers' belongings and parts of the wreck of EgyptAir flight MS804 are seen as more wreckage found north of Alexandria, in Egypt on May 21, 2016. EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed with 56 passengers and 10 crew on board on May 19. (Photo by Egyptian Armed Forces / Handout /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
This still image taken from video posted Saturday, May 21, 2016, on the official Facebook page of the Egyptian Armed Forces spokesman shows personal belongings and other wreckage of EgyptAir flight 804. Smoke was detected in multiple places on EgyptAir flight 804 moments before it plummeted into the Mediterranean, but the cause of the crash that killed all 66 on board remains unclear, the French air accident investigation agency said on Saturday. (Egyptian Armed Forces via AP)
This still image taken from video posted Saturday, May 21, 2016, on the official Facebook page of the Egyptian Armed Forces spokesman shows a piece of carpet from the wreckage of EgyptAir flight 804. Smoke was detected in multiple places on EgyptAir flight 804 moments before it plummeted into the Mediterranean, but the cause of the crash that killed all 66 on board remains unclear, the French air accident investigation agency said on Saturday. (Egyptian Armed Forces via AP)
This still image taken from video posted Saturday, May 21, 2016, on the official Facebook page of the Egyptian Armed Forces spokesman shows some personal belongings and other wreckage from EgyptAir flight 804. Smoke was detected in multiple places on EgyptAir flight 804 moments before it plummeted into the Mediterranean, but the cause of the crash that killed all 66 on board remains unclear, the French air accident investigation agency said on Saturday. (Egyptian Armed Forces via AP)
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"The vessel's equipment was able to salvage the part that contains the memory unit, which is considered the most important part of the recording device," the statement said.

Egypt's public prosecutor was informed and ordered that the recovered device, one of two so-called black boxes on the plane, be handed over to the Egyptian investigating team for analysis.

The device is now being transferred from the vessel, John Lethbridge, to the coastal city of Alexandria where representatives from the public prosecution and investigators are waiting to receive it, the statement said.

EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed into the Mediterranean early on May 19, killing all 66 people on board.

Since then, search teams have been working against the clock to recover the black box flight recorders which are crucial to explaining what caused the Airbus A320 to crash.

(Reporting by Lin Noueihed; Editing by Ahmed Aboulenein)

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