4 things harder to get in America than a gun

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Why Are Guns Easier To Get Than Abortions?

Omar Mateen used a legally purchased semi-automatic rifle to gun down 49 people and injure dozens more at an Orlando nightclub on June 12.

The very next day, a reporter for the Philadelphia Daily News purchased an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle in just seven minutes in Philadelphia.

Two days after the mass shooting, two Huffington Post reporters walked into a Florida gun shop empty-handed and left just 38 minutes later with an AR-15 assault rifle in hand. The gun shop employee there told the HuffPo reporters that they would have been in and out of the store with a gun in five minutes, but there was a backlog of background checks because people were rushing to purchase guns in the wake of the Orlando shooting.

It's not unusual for gun (and ammunition) sales to spike after a high-profile shooting as many Americans stock up on ammo and guns, fueled by fear of tighter gun control initiatives. The FBI conducted a record 23.1 million firearm background checks in 2015 — more than 3.3 million of which occurred in December, after the deadly shooting spree in San Bernardino, which left 14 dead and 22 seriously wounded.

The 2016 Senate filibuster for gun control:

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2016 senate filibuster for gun control
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2016 senate filibuster for gun control
This frame grab provided by C-SPAN shows Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn. speaking on the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 15, 2016, where he launched a filibuster demanding a vote on gun control measures. The move comes three days after people were killed in a mass shooting in Orlando. (Senate Television via AP)
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R, obscured) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) collects himself as members of his staff catch up with him in the halls after he ended a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (L) speak to staff members after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) speak to reporters after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Spencer Davis (L), an intern for U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX), greets Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) as he departs the Senate floor to thank him for his work with fellow senators on a filibuster to put pressure on legislators to move on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. Davis said he was moved to meet Booker because he had a relative killed in an infamous 1966 shooting spree from a tower at the University of Texas. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (center L) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (center R) depart the Senate floor directly after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) (C) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) (R) speak to aides directly after ending a 14-hour filibuster in the hopes of pressuring the U.S. Senate to action on gun control measures, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. June 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 15: Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) leaves in an elevator after assisting Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) in waging an almost 15-hour filibuster on the Senate floor in order to force a vote on gun control on June 15, 2016 in Washington, DC. Murphy wants the Senate to vote on a measure banning anyone on the no-fly list from purchasing a weapon. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
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Just how easy (or difficult) is it to obtain a firearm in the United States? Well, here are four (far less lethal) items that are arguably more difficult to get:

  • Allergy/cold medicine: If you're suffering from a cold or allergies, getting your hands on Sudafed (or another similar over-the-counter cold medicine with pseudoephedrine in it) can be a pain. Because pseudoephedrine is used to make methamphetamine, you have to show a photo identification to purchase the medicine, which is also logged into a database. The U.S. government has also implemented daily sales limits and 30-day purchasing limits on the medicine — a part of the Combat Methamphetamine Act of 2005.
  • A pet: Adopting a pet in the United States. isn't easy. You don't walk into a shelter, find a cute puppy and head home with your new dog the same day. Typically, animal shelters require an extensive application, interview, background check and some even ask for personal references. There's also a chance your home may be inspected before the shelter decides if you're fit to be a pet owner. Although licensed gun dealers work with the FBI to conduct federal background checks on prospective gun owners, most states don't require background checks if you're purchasing a gun from a private individual at a gun show, according to MarketWatch.
  • Marriage license: I live in Montana. Before I was able to get a marriage license here, I had to get a blood test for rubella immunity, so there was a waiting period between the test and obtaining the license. If you want to get married in Louisiana, you have a 3-day waiting period between the time you obtain the marriage license and the actual marriage ceremony. As the Philadelphia Daily News reporter found out, you can leave a gun shop with a semiautomatic rifle in seven minutes.
  • An abortion: In Florida, there's no waiting period to purchase an assault rifle like Mateen used. But if a woman wants to get an abortion in the Sunshine State, she must have an ultrasound and in-person counseling, plus a wait period of 24-hours, before she's able to get the medical service performed, according to Rolling Stone.

Do you think it's too easy to get your hands on a gun in the United States? Sound off below or on our Facebook page.

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RELATED: Reactions to Trump's abortion comments

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Reactions to Trump's abortion comments
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Reactions to Trump's abortion comments
Just when you thought it couldn't get worse. Horrific and telling. -H https://t.co/Qi8TutsOw9
Your Republican frontrunner, ladies and gentlemen. Shameful. https://t.co/y49Z8YfRgV
.@realDonaldTrump is vocalizing the motivations of every politician who votes to restrict access to abortion. It's about controlling women.
.@JohnKasich reacts to Trump's abortion comments: "Of course, women shouldn't be punished" for having an abortion https://t.co/bLyaNPVGoE
Pretty incredible. Trump's advocated partial birth abortion and criminalizing abortion for women. Largest tax increase ever/huge tax cut.
Are we shocked that Trump has an incoherent position on abortion? He has an incoherent position on anything else.
100% disagree with Trump re abortion but if something's made illegal there has to be punishment for doing it or how else do you enforce law?
When U come out of meeting and see this headline in inbox: Trump Says Women May Need Punishment If Abortion Banned https://t.co/LCx2TOepLQ
Trump on abortion is like Trump on basically everything else: the man has quite evidently put zero thought into the issue. None.
Be fair, was asked if it was ILLEGAL should there be punishment. Shouldn't there be consequences for breaking laws? https://t.co/FcR0IReRM5
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