Will Smith and Lennox Lewis to be pallbearers at Muhammad Ali's funeral

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Will Smith, Lennox Lewis to serve as Muhammad Ali pallbearers


Muhammad Ali and his innermost circle started a document years ago that grew so thick they began calling it "The Book."

Its contents will soon be revealed.

In the pages, the boxing great planned in exacting detail how he wished to say goodbye to the world.

"The message that we'll be sending out is not our message — this was really designed by The Champ himself," said Timothy Gianotti, an Islamic studies scholar who for years helped to plan the services.

"The love and the reverence and the inclusivity that we're going to experience over the coming days is really a reflection of his message to the people of planet Earth."

The 74-year-old three-time heavyweight champion wanted the memorial service in an arena. He wanted multiple religions to have a voice while honoring the traditions of his Muslim faith. And he wanted ordinary fans to attend, not just VIPs.

He was never downcast when talking about his death, said Bob Gunnell, an Ali family spokesman. He recalled Ali's own words during meetings planning the funeral: "It's OK. We're here to do the job the way I want it. It's fine."

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Will Smith and Lennox Lewis to be pallbearers at Muhammad Ali's funeral
George Foreman (L) and Muhammad Ali(R) are greeted by actor Will Smith (C) after the movie 'When We Were Kings' won the Oscar for Best Documentry Feature during the 69th Academy Awards 24 March at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) Timothy A. Clary (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
17 Jun 2000: Former boxing great Muhammad Ali poses with actor and musical artist Will Smith before the start of the Oscar De La Hoya and Sugar Shane Mosley bout at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, California. DIGITAL IMAGE Mandatory Credit: Jed Jacobsohn/ALLSPORT
LOS ANGELES, UNITED STATES: US former world heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali (L) jokes with US actor Will Smith (R) who portrays him in new film 'Ali,' at the movie's premiere in Hollywood, CA, 12 December 2001. AFP PHOTO/Lucy NICHOLSON (Photo credit should read LUCY NICHOLSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Muhammad Ali accepting his Humanitarian Award from presenter Will Smith (Photo by M. Caulfield/WireImage)
Muhammad Ali accepting his Humanitarian Award from presenter Will Smith (Photo by M. Caulfield/WireImage)
MIAMI - DECEMBER 6: Boxing legend Muhammad Ali (L) stands with actor Will Smith at the Miami Art Basel Taschen book premiere of Ali's new book, 'GOAT - Greatest Of All Time' at the Miami Convention Center December 6, 2003 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Gregorio Binuya/Getty Images)
MIAMI - DECEMBER 6: Boxing legend Muhammad Ali (L) gestures behind the head of actor Will Smith at the Miami Art Basel Taschen book premiere of Ali's new book, 'GOAT - Greatest Of All Time' at the Miami Convention Center December 6, 2003 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Gregorio Binuya/Getty Images)
MIAMI - DECEMBER 6: Boxing legend Muhammad Ali (C) gestures behind the head of actor Will Smith (R) as singer Sean P. Diddy Combs looks on at the Miami Art Basel Taschen book premiere of Ali's new book, 'GOAT - Greatest Of All Time' at the Miami Convention Center December 6, 2003 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Gregorio Binuya/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS - MAY 01: Boxing legend Muhammad Ali talks with actor Will Smith before the start of the Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Shane Mosley welterweight fight at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 1, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
Boxing legend Muhammad Ali (L) hugs actor Will Smith before the start of the Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Shane Mosley welterweight fight at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 1, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
Boxing legend Muhammad Ali (L) talks with actor Will Smith before the start of the Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Shane Mosley welterweight fight at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 1, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
Boxer Muhammad Ali (C) pretends to choke actor Will Smith (R) as singer P Diddy (L) looks on, at the launch of Tashens' new 75 pound book, 'Goat' (Greatest of all time), at the historic site of Ali's 1964 triumph over Sonny Liston, the Miami beach convention Center in Miami, Florida, December 6, 2003. The event is part of the Art Basel international art show week in south Florida. REUTERS/Marc Serota MS/HB
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The final revisions were made days before Ali died Friday at an Arizona hospital, his family by his side.

For years, the plan was to have Ali's body lie in repose at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Gunnell said. That tribute was dropped at the last minute because his wife, Lonnie, worried it would cause the center to be shut down and knew people would want to gather there in grief.

In its place, a miles-long procession was added that will carry Ali's body across his beloved hometown. It will drive past the museum built in his honor, along the boulevard named after him and through the neighborhood where he grew up, raced bicycles and shadowboxed down the streets.

In a city accustomed to capturing the world's attention for just two minutes during the Kentucky Derby each year, Ali's memorial service Friday looms as one of the most historic events in Louisville's history. Former presidents, heads of nations from around the globe, movie stars and sports greats will descend upon the city to pay final respects to The Louisville Lip.

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"It's been a really bittersweet time for our city," Mayor Greg Fischer said. "We've all been dreading the passing of The Champ, but at the same time we knew ultimately it would come. It was selfish for us to think that we could hold on to him forever. Our job now, as a city, is to send him off with the class and dignity and respect that he deserves."

Former President Bill Clinton, a longtime friend, will deliver the eulogy at the funeral at the KFC Yum! Center, where the 15,000 seats are likely to be filled.

Others speakers will include representatives of multiple faiths, including Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism and Mormonism.

Some are lifelong friends. Others Ali simply admired.

Rabbi Michael Lerner was in his office at his home in Berkley, California, on Sunday morning when, out of the blue, Ronald DiNicola, president of Muhammad Ali Enterprises, called and invited the rabbi to speak at the funeral.

He and Ali met in the 1960s as two vocal opponents to the Vietnam War. They did not see each other again. But DiNicola told Lerner that for the rest of the boxer's life, Ali admired the rabbi's work as editor of the Jewish progressive magazine Tikkun and author of numerous books.

"I didn't know that he continued to follow my work; I certainly followed him, what he was doing and the courage he did it with," Lerner said. "I am extremely honored and extremely humbled."

He and the other faith leaders will be followed by Ali's wife, daughter Maryum Ali, actor Billy Crystal and sportscaster Bryant Gumbel. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and King Abdullah II of Jordan had been scheduled to speak, but lost their speaking spots because two other speakers will be added later, Gunnell said.

"It's not about who they are, it's about the fact that we just don't have room on the program for them," Gunnell said, adding that their representatives were "gracious and understood" when informed.

Actor Will Smith, who portrayed Muhammad Ali in the movie Ali, and former world heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis are among eight pallbearers for Ali's memorial service this week in Louisville.

Also serving are Jerry Ellis, brother of Jimmy Ellis, who was Ali's former sparring partner and former world heavyweight champion; and several of Ali's relatives and a friend from Louisville.

Most downtown hotel rooms were already booked by Monday afternoon, and those in the rest of the city were selling out fast, said Stacey Yates of the city's tourism bureau.

At the city's iconic Brown Hotel, the Muhammad Ali Suite, an opulent gold-and-black room dedicated in 2001 by The Greatest himself, was already booked. The hotel declined to say who would be staying there.

All over town, Louisville residents have been finding ways to pay tribute to their city's favorite son. The Muhammad Ali Center stopped charging people for admission. A tour company began impromptu tours of Ali's path through the city. A downtown bridge announced it would be lit the rest of the week in red and gold: red for Ali's gloves and gold for his medal.

The day before his star-studded funeral, members of Ali's Islamic faith will get their chance to say a traditional goodbye. A Jenazah, a traditional Muslim funeral, will be held at Freedom Hall at noon Thursday, Gunnell said. It will be open to all.

They chose the venue because it seats 18,000 and holds historical significance for the hometown hero. Ali fought, and won, his first professional fight there in 1960.

Gianotti, the Islamic studies scholar, said the Muslim funeral was "critically important for the global Muslim community to say goodbye to their beloved champ."

Read MoreMuhammad Ali, 'The Greatest' Boxing Legend, Dies at 74

The inner circle that helped the Alis with funeral preparations included his attorney and a business associate, Gunnell said. The group presented "The Book" — about 2 inches thick with funeral details — to Ali in 2010, the family spokesman said.

"Muhammad, over the course of about a week, went through the entire plan and signed it and certified it and approved it," Gunnell said.

Ali's burial will be in Cave Hill Cemetery, the final resting place for many of the city's most prominent residents. The luminaries include Colonel Harlan Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, whose granite memorial features a bust of the goateed entrepreneur.

Ali's gravesite will far more subdued, in contrast to his oversized personality and life. A modest marker, in accord with Muslim tradition, is planned, said his attorney, Ron Tweel. He would not say what words will be inscribed on the marker.

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Will Smith and Lennox Lewis to be pallbearers at Muhammad Ali's funeral
Boxer Muhammad Ali (l) stands with his trainer Angelo Dundee at City Parks Gym, New York, b&w photo on texture, partial graphic
Boxer Cassius Clay is shown in a posed action stance, April, 1962, at the Madison Square Garden photo studio. (AP Photo)
Young boxer Cassius Clay of Louisville, Kentucky, is examined by Dr. Samuel Swetnick in New York as a preliminary to his heavyweight fight with Billy Daniels, behind them, May 12, 1962. Both boxers are undefeated. (AP Photo)
** FILE **Young heavyweight boxer Cassius Clay points to a sign he wrote on a chalk board in his dressing room before his fight against Archie Moore in Los Angeles, in this Nov. 15, 1962, file photo predicting he'd knock Moore out in the fourth round, which he went on to do. The sign also predicts Clay will be the next champ via a knockout over Sonny Liston in eight rounds. A new book, "Ali Rap: Muhammad Ali the First Heavyweight Champion of Rap," proclaims Ali's verbal barrage was more than self-promotion, but sowed the seeds of hip-hop, which came into being in the `70s. (AP Photo/Harold P. Matosian/FILE)
FILE - A June 18, 1963 photo from files showing world famous boxer Muhammad Ali (or Cassius Clay as he was then known), right, and British heavyweight champion Henry Cooper as they seem to be trying to out shout each other at weigh-in in London for their heavyweight fight the same evening. Ali holds up five fingers, the number of rounds he modestly predicts he'll knockout Cooper.Sir Henry has died aged 76, sources told Britain's Press Association Sunday May 1, 2011. He was well known for two famous clashes with Muhammad Ali in the 1960's flooring Ali in the 4th round of a 1963 non-title fight at London's Wembley, though Ali eventually won the fight. He fought Ali again in 1966 but was again beaten. (AP Photo)
British heavyweight champion Henry Cooper, right, is pictured throwing a long right to the jaw of Cassius Clay during their bout in London, England, June 18, 1963. Cooper's left eye is bloody from a cut opened by Clay in the third round. The American boxer from Louisville was downed by Cooper in the fourth round, but was saved by the bell and returned to make good on his prophesy by stopping Cooper in the fifth. (AP Photo)
Boxer Cassius Clay lifts Ringo Starr, one of the Beatles into the air while the singers visited Clay's camp in Miami Beach, Fla. , February 18, 1964. Others are, from left: Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and John Lennon. (AP Photo)
Boxer Eddie Machen, left, aims a fist toward the open mouth of Cassius Clay, Feb. 22, 1964 in Miami Beach as the pair engaged in a friendly verbal exchange. Their paths crossed at the Miami Beach Convention Hall where Clay and heavyweight champion Sonny Liston meet on Tuesday night. Machen lost a 12-round decision to Liston in 1960 and is the last boxer to go the full route with him. (AP Photo/Harry Harris)
Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay at the time, strikes a familiar pose as he shouts "I am the greatest," as he leaves the ring, arms raised, following his defeat of former heavyweight boxing champion Sonny Liston in Miami Beach, Fla., February 25, 1964. (AP Photo)
Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay, as he was known at the time, is shown during the heavyweight title fightagainst Sonny Liston in Miami Beach, Fla., Feb. 25, 1964.The bout lasted only one minute into the first round. (AP Photo)
Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay, right, as he was known at the time, is shown in action against Sonny Liston during the heavyweight title fight in Miami Beach, Fla., Feb. 25, 1964.The bout lasted only one minute into the first round. (AP Photo)
Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay as he was known at the time, whips a right to the head of ducking champ Sonny Liston during the first round of the heavyweight title fight in Miami Beach, Fla., Feb. 25, 1964. (AP Photo)
Challenger Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay as he was known at the time, pokes a fast left jab to the face of Sonny Liston during their championship heavyweight fight in Miami Beach, Fla., Feb 25, 1964. Clay used the in and out tactics to gain a TKO in the seventh round after Liston strained a shoulder and suffered a bad gash under the left eye. (AP Photo)
Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay, left, as he was known at the time, is shown in action against Sonny Liston during the heavyweight title fight in Miami Beach, Fla., Feb. 25, 1964. The bout lasted only one minute into the first round. (AP Photo)
US-American boxer Muhammad Ali (former Cassius Clay) gets his teeth checked, in Boston, USA, October 9, 1964. (AP Photo/Str) --- Der US-amerikanische Boxer Muhammad Ali (frueher Cassius Clay) bei einer zahnaerztlichen Untersuchung in Boston, USA, am 9. Oktober 1964. (AP Photo/Str)
World Heavyweight Champion Cassius Clay, right, gestures at a press conference at his training camp, May 4, 1965, Chicopee, Mass. Clay will meet ex-titlist Sonny Liston in a rematch scheduled for May 25 at Boston Garden. Clay refused to name the round in which he predicts he will knock out Liston. At left is Stepin Fetchit, former stage and screen star. (AP Photo)
World Heavyweight champion Cassius Clay, Muhammad Ali, on scales, leans over to tickle British Challenger Henry Cooper under the arm during the Weigh-in of the two boxers at Odeon Theatre, Leicester Square, London, on May 21, 1966 for World Title Fight at Highbury Stadium, London. On Cooper?s left is Ted Waltham, Secretary British Boxing Board of Control. (AP Photo/Tewkesbury)
With blood pouring from the gash above his left eye, British boxer Henry Cooper tries to avoid further damage from World Heavyweight Champion Cassius Clay during the sixth round of their world title fight at Highbury Stadium, London, on Mat 21, 1966. The referee stopped the fight in the sixth round with Clay retaining his title. (AP Photo)
World heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali trains on the punching bag at a gymnasium in London, England, on Aug. 3, 1966. The American boxer is training for his title bout with Brian London of Britain on Aug. 6. (AP Photo)
U.S. american boxer Muhammad Ali, former Cassius Clay, is surrounded by the press after arriving at Frankfurt am Main's, West Germany, International Airport August 30, 1966. Ali will fight German Boxer Karl Mildenberger September 10th here in Frankfurt. (AP Photo/Stf)
Winner Muhammad Ali, right, is offered a drink from water bottle by Oscar Bonavena at news conference following their 15-round fight in New York?s Madison square garden on Dec. 7, 1970. Ali knocked out the Argentine heavyweight in the fifteenth round. (AP Photo)
Boxer Muhammad Ali is shown pile driving a right to the face of Oscar Bonavena in the third round of their bout at Madison Square Garden, New York City on December 7, 1970. Ali, returning after the Supreme Court overturned his conviction regarding dodging the draft in June, knocked Bonavena down 3 times in the 15th round before finally winning the fight in a technical knockout. (AP Photo)
Muhammad Ali delivers a hard right to Jerry Quarry on October 26, 1970 in a scheduled 15 round fight at Atlanta, Ga. Ali was declared the winner after Quarry didn't answer the bell for the fourth round. Quarry had a gash over his left eye that required 11stitches to close. (AP Photo/Joe Holloway Jr.)
Speaking at a press conference in Chicago, Friday, Sept. 25, 1970, deposed world heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali "Cassius Clay" said he might fight Jerry Quarry in New York if Georgia Gov. Lester Maddox succeeds in halting the scheduled Atlanta bout. (AP Photo/Charles Kolenovsky)
Muhammad Ali, right, lands a right to the chin of Orvill Qualle of Chicago during their three round exhibition in Detroit on June 15, 1967. The boxers wore headgear and wore 16-ounce gloves in the fracas. Clay took on two opponents for three rounds each. There were no knockdowns. (AP Photo/PS)
Muhammad Ali is seen outside the Federal Building in Houston after he heard a federal judge tell him to refile his plea to avoid the draft after his scheduled induction, April 27, 1967. Ali had a "no comment," to questions asked on all subjects. (AP Photo/Ferd Kaufman)
Heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali poses during weigh-in for his bout with Zora Folley at New York's Madison Square Garden, March 22, 1967. (AP Photo)
Boxer Muhammad Ali crouches on the canvas as Joe Frazier circles in background (not seen) after Ali slipped during the 11th round of their title fight, March 8, 1971, New York. (AP Photo)
Muhammad Ali, left, during fight with George Foreman, red shorts, in Kinshasa, Zaire, October 30, 1974. Ali won the fight in Africa by a knock out in the 8th round. (AP Photo)
Former heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali carries his son, Muhammad Ali, Jr., on his shoulders, Aug. 24, 1974, as he points toward the building in Cherry Hill, N.J., where the family will reside temporarily while they search for land to build a home on. (AP Photo/Bill Ingraham)
FILE - In this Jan. 28, 1974, file photo, Muhammad Ali, left, and Joe Frazier fight in a 12-round non-title fight at Madison Square Garden in New York. Former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier is seriously ill with liver cancer. His personal and business manager says Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011, the 67-year-old boxer was diagnosed four or five weeks ago and is under hospice care. (AP Photo, File)
** FILE ** Trevor Berbick, left, and Muhammad Ali seem to have an equal reach as they slug it out during a Friday night boxing match in this Dec. 12, 1981 file photo in Nassau, Bahamas. Berbick, who lost his heavyweight title to Mike Tyson and was the last boxer to fight Muhammad Ali, was found dead Saturday, Oct. 28, 2006, in a church courtyard in Kingston, Jamaica, police said. He was 52. (AP Photo)
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