A mom sick and tired of standardized testing tore into the system and came out on top in a major way

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A mom who was clearly sick and tired of standardized testing and the effect that it has it on kids, filmed herself on a lengthy rant that was all done to say one thing: our kids our more than a bubble on a piece of paper.

North Carolina mom Leigh Thomas Brown had only one goal in mind, which was to allow teachers to, well, teach again.

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Brown ran with the idea that policy makers at the state and national level have fallen out of touch with what's going on in public schools since, she said, they were so busy sending their kids to private school.

"The bigger problem is, you need to return the classrooms to the teachers," she said. "Let the administrators be actual administrators who aren't scared to death of federal and state government, and red tape."

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"And all of these threats about money getting pulled back from the schools... that just burns my biscuits to hear people like the Obama Administration fussing about 'we'll take your money away from the schools,'" she continued. "Put your ass in the school, your children aren't in the public schools."

"My children matter, your children matter, and they are more than a bubble on a sheet," she added.

(H/t Little Things)

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A mom sick and tired of standardized testing tore into the system and came out on top in a major way
In this photo taken Feb. 12, 2015, sixth grade teacher Carrie Young, back center, answers questions from her students about an exercise on their laptops as they practice for the the Common Core State Standards Test in her classroom at Morgan Elementary School South in Stockport, Ohio. On Tuesday, Ohio becomes the first state to administer one of two tests in English language arts and math based on the Common Core standards developed by two separate groups of states. By the end of the year, about 12 million children in 28 states and the District of Columbia will take exams that are expected to be harder than traditional spring standardized state tests they replace. In some states, they'll require hours of additional testing time students will have to do more than just fill in the bubble. The goal is to test students on critical thinking skills, requiring them to describe their reasoning and solve problems. (AP Photo/Ty Wright)
Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke, left, joins with Rep. Jeremy Thiesfeldt, center, and Speaker Robin Vos Thursday, April 23, 2015, in Madison, Wis., in promising that a bill will pass next month ensuring the results of standardized test scores aren't used to measure performance. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer)
FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, practice test books sit on a table in the sixth grade English Language Arts and Social Studies classroom at Morgan Elementary School South in Stockport, Ohio. Call this the year of the test. Or, at least the year of standardized test mania. For all the headlines of technical test problems in some states and parents opting their children out of test taking, testing proponents say the roll out in much of the country this spring of new standardized tests taken on a computer has had relatively few major hitches. (AP Photo/Ty Wright, File)
Waving their placards, students and teachers huddle together in freezing temperatures during a rally against what protesters called "excessive" standardized testing in Colorado schools Wednesday, March 25, 2015, on the west steps of the State Capitol in Denver. More than 100 protesters were on hand for the rally, which was organized by the Colorado Education Association. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Dolores Ramos, 16, right, joins dozens of Highland High School students in Albuquerque, N.M., as students staged a walkout Monday March 2, 2015, to protest a new standardized test they say isn't an accurate measurement of their education. Students frustrated over the new exam walked out of schools across the state Monday in protest as the new exam was being given. The backlash came as millions of U.S. students start taking more rigorous exams aligned with Common Core standards. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)
Hundreds of Albuquerque High School students stage a walkout in Albuquerque, N.M. on Monday, March 2, 2015, to protest a new standardized test they say isn't an accurate measurement of their education. Students frustrated over the new exam walked out of schools across the state Monday in protest as the new exam was being given. The backlash came as millions of U.S. students start taking more rigorous exams aligned with Common Core standards. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)
FILE - This April 1, 2014 file photo shows an ACT Assessment test in Springfield, Ill. The popular ACT college admissions exam is broadening how it reports student's scores. The exam's traditional 36-point scale remains unchanged, but starting next year students will receive an ACT score on two new "readiness indicators" reflecting how they did in terms of career readiness and understanding a complex text. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)
Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences teachers Kelley Collings, left, and Amy Roat pose for a portrait Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, in Philadelphia. Nearly 20 percent of students at a Philadelphia middle school won’t be taking the state’s annual standardized tests after teachers informed parents of the right to opt out of the assessments. Having children sit out the high-stakes exams has become a form of civil disobedience nationwide for those who say education officials aren’t listening to complaints about the volume of such assessments. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Republican Reps. John Lamar III, of Senatobia, left , and Ken Morgan of Morgantown, listen as House Education Committee Rep. Mark Baker, R-Brandon, presents House Bill 385, banning use of a Common Core-related test, wiping out high school exit exams in biology and U.S. history, and pushing the state Board of Education to adopt standardized tests published by the ACT organization in House Chambers, Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015 at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. The House bill passed 116-3 and moves to the Senate for more debate. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
A computer-based practice ACT English test is displayed on a computer monitor Wednesday, May 6, 2015, in Washington. The ACT is announcing May 8, 2015, that computer-based testing of the ACT would be available next year in the states and districts that require students to take the ACT during the school day. About 1 million students could be affected. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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