Military identifies Fort Hood soldiers killed in Texas floods

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Fort Hood Flooding Death Toll Climbs to 9 After 4 More Bodies Found

(Reuters) - The U.S. military released the names on Saturday of eight of nine soldiers who were killed this week when their vehicle overturned in flood waters in Texas.

The soldiers died when their military vehicle flipped over in a flood-swollen creek on Thursday at Fort Hood Army post in central Texas.

Three survivors were released from hospital on Friday.

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Among those killed were Staff Sergeant Miguel Angel Colonvazquez, 38, Specialist Christine Faith Armstrong, 27, Private First Class Brandon Austin Banner, 22, Private First Class Zachery Nathaniel Fuller, 23, and Private Isaac Lee Deleon, 19.

Private Eddy Raelaurin Gates, 20, Private Tysheena Lynette James, 21, and Cadet Mitchell Alexander Winey, 21, also died in the accident, the circumstances of which remain unknown, pending an investigation by a team from the Army Combat Readiness Center in Fort Rucker, Alabama, the Fort Hood base said in a statement.

See photos from the Texas flooding:

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Military identifies Fort Hood soldiers killed in Texas floods
Flood waters from the rain-swollen Brazos River continue to rise in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
A house is flooded by water from the rain-swollen Brazos River in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
Flood waters from the rain-swollen Brazos River continue to rise in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
Honorina Paniagua sits on the upper step of her mobile home as flood waters continue to rise in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
Alejandra Ventura lifts her dog out of the water as the Brazos River tops its banks and floods a mobile home park in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
Alejandra Ventura walks through high water as the Brazos River tops its banks and floods a mobile home park in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
A mobile home park is flooded by the rain-swollen Brazos River in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
Jeff Harper drives his boat on the rain-swollen Brazos River near Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
A mobile home park lies flooded as the Brazos River approaches its crest in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
A mobile home lies almost completely underwater after heavy rains in Richmond, Texas, U.S. May 31, 2016. Precipitation was expected to intensify over the weekend as moisture from tropical depression Patricia, which struck the Pacific coast of Mexico on Friday as a very powerful hurricane, meets with a storm system coming from the west and over Texas. REUTERS/Daniel Kramer
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The vehicle overturned at a low-water crossing and military officials have not said why the convoy was training near a swollen waterway. The sprawling army post, which covers an area about 15 times larger than Manhattan, was closing flood-hit roads when the accident took place.

The identity of the ninth soldier killed will be released after the next of kin are formally notified.

Torrential rains over the past week have deluged hundreds of homes and led to prison evacuations in the area. At least seven other peopled died in weather-related incidents.

(Reporting by Chris Michaud; Editing by Paul Tait)

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