Christians, Jews and Muslims united to help this Syrian refugee family

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Christians, Jews and Muslims United to Help This Syrian Refugee Family

Syrian refugee family. The Canadian interfaith group is called ACT.

"ACT, Abraham's Children Together, is a group of Muslims, Christians and Jews coming together specifically to help refugees from Syria come to Canada," said Rabbi Stephen Wise.

"So basically about 18 months ago, I called up my friend Morar, who happens to be a minister in the United Church, and my friend Stephen, who's a rabbi at the synagogue, and I said, 'Look, guys; let's have breakfast together and talk about the Syrian crisis,'" said Dr. Aliya Khan.

"It came together, I think, based on the friendships and trust that had developed amongst the members of the different faiths," said Rabbi Wise.

ACT pooled its congregations' resources to support the Al-Balkhis — a family of seven.

"My name is Asyad, and these are my family. We are from Syria. We came in December the 20th, 2015."

"This is the first I've heard about three different cultures, or religions, just to help the Syrians. So then they found this house for us, and we moved here, and all of the furniture here is also provided from them."

Over the course of a year, the Al-Balkhis will transition toward independence.

ACT is just one of the many thousands of private sponsors that have taken in Syrian refugees alongside Canada's government.

Syrian children, refugees and soldiers:

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Syrian children, refugees and soldiers
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Christians, Jews and Muslims united to help this Syrian refugee family
In this March 3, 2016 photo, Maria Al-Tawil, poses for a portrait inside her family's tent in Idomeni, Greece. Maria was born in Damascus just four months before the war in Syria broke out. She has experienced nothing but war, her mother Narjes Al Shalaby, 27, told the Associated Press. âI have a lot of anxiety, she hasnât lived a good day in her life,â she said. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
In this March 6, 2016 photo, Winda Farman Haji, a 5-year-old refugee from a town outside Malikiyah in northeast Syria, poses for a portrait inside the tent she shares with her family at Kawergosk refugee camp in Iraq. Winda was born in a village outside Malikiyah in the Kurdish part of northeastern Syria, where her father Sharif Farman Haji, 44 worked as a lorry driver on the Malikiyah-Qamishly route. They fled August 2012 but their troubles didnât end there. Her uncle, died fighting IS in Kobane in the ranks of the Iraqi Peshmerga. (AP Photo/Alice Martins)
In this picture taken on March 2, 2016, five-year-old Syrian refugee Yasmine Abdulkarim, poses inside her tent at an informal camp, in Qab Elias in the Bekaa valley, eastern Lebanon. She was born in the province of Aleppo on October 15th 2011 but doesnât have any recollection of Syria. âIf we were in Syria, I would love to take her home, to the house she was born in but doesnât know.â Her mother Rukaya says. âI would take her to all the places we loved and she would love them too.â (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
FILE - In this Thursday, May 29, 2014 file photo, a Syrian refugee girl sits in a classroom at a Lebanese public school where only Syrian students attend classes in the afternoon, at Kaitaa village in north Lebanon. UNICEF said Monday, March 14, 2016 that one-third of Syrians under the age of 18, or about 3.7 million, were born since an uprising against President Bashar Assad erupted in 2011 and escalated into a civil war. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
FILE - In this May 29, 2014, file photo, a Syrian refugee boy stands outside his family room at a collective center, in Kirbet Daoud village in Akkar north Lebanon. The U.N. agency for children says more than 80 percent of Syria's children have been harmed by the five-year-old conflict, including growing numbers forced to work, join armed groups or marry young because of widening poverty. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
In this March 6, 2016 photo, Winda Farman Haji, right, a 5-year-old refugee from a town outside Malikiyah in northeast Syria, walks back to her tent after school alongside friends at Kawergosk refugee camp in Iraq where she has lived since 2012 . Winda shows great talent in drawing and her parents say she is very impatient to go to kindergarten every morning. (AP Photo/Alice Martins)
In this Feb. 13, 2016 photo, five year-old Hamza Ali, who fled with his family from Aleppo, Syria 3 years ago, poses for a portrait in Istanbul, Turkey. Mustafa Ali often tells his children about the beauty of the land they left behind. He was a primary school teacher and a sports trainer in Aleppo until he had to flee three years ago with his wife Suzan, 25, and his two children Sedra, 8, and Hamza, 5. His youngest daughter, Hulya, 2, was born in their adopted city, Istanbul, Turkey. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
In this Monday, March 7, 2016 photo, Tala al-Faouri, 5, poses for a picture inside her family's shelter in the Zaatari Refugee Camp, near Mafraq, Jordan. Just two weeks after the Syrian conflict started, Tala was born in the southern province of Daraa, where the Syrian conflict originated, on March 28, 2011. Her mother Doaa dreams of returning and raising Tala in Syria. âWe were not rich, but we were not poor. We lived a fine life. God willing, she will live like we once did. We donât want more, or less, than that,â she says. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)
FILE -- In this May 29, 2014, file photo, Lujain Hourani, 11, a Syrian refugee girl who lost part of her shoulder in a government forces airstrike in the Syrian village of Zara, near Homs, stands outside her family room, at a collective center where many Syrian refugees live, in Kirbet Daoud village in Akkar north Lebanon. The U.N. agency for children says more than 80 percent of Syria's children have been harmed by the five-year-old conflict, including growing numbers forced to work, join armed groups or marry young because of widening poverty. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013 file photo, A Syrian refugee boy sits on the ground at a temporary refugee camp, in the eastern Lebanese Town of Al-Faour, Bekaa valley near the border with Syria, Lebanon. UNICEF on Monday, March 14, 2016 said it verified close to 1,500 grave violations against children in 2015, including killings and abductions. The agency says the actual figure is believed to be higher. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2015 file photo, a Syrian boy looks out through his tent door covered in snow at a refugee camp in Deir Zannoun village, in the Bekaa valley, east Lebanon. UNICEF said Monday, March 14, 2016 that one-third of Syrians under the age of 18, or about 3.7 million, were born since an uprising against President Bashar Assad erupted in 2011 and escalated into a civil war. The fighting has killed more than 250,000 people and displaced almost half the country's pre-war population of 23 million. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
In this March 6, 2016 photo, Winda Farman Haji, right, a 5-year-old refugee from a town outside Malikiyah in northeast Syria, walks back to her tent after school alongside friends at Kawergosk refugee camp in Iraq where she has lived since 2012 . Winda shows great talent in drawing and her parents say she is very impatient to go to kindergarten every morning. (AP Photo/Alice Martins)
FILE - In this Sunday, July 19, 2015 file photo, Syrian refugee girl, Zubaida Faisal, 10, skips a rope while she and other children play near their tents at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan. UNICEF said Monday, March 14, 2016 that one-third of Syrians under the age of 18, or about 3.7 million, were born since an uprising against President Bashar Assad erupted in 2011 and escalated into a civil war. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen, File)
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