Snorting chocolate becomes all the rage in Europe nightclubs

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Some People Are Snorting Chocolate To Get High

Drugs like Ecstasy and LSD have become staples in nightclub scenes around the world. But there's a new product taking over parties in Europe -- and some claim it's a totally sweet trip.

SEE ALSO: Jet-black coconut ash ice cream is the flavor to try this summer

Clubbers have started snorting lines of cocoa to get high, according to the Daily Mail.

Users reportedly get buzzed from taking the chocolate in drink, pill or powdered form.

It then sends a rush of endorphins into users' bloodstreams, which can give them a euphoric feeling, especially when coupled with dancing.

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Snorting chocolate becomes all the rage in Europe nightclubs
Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone snorts cocoa powder off his Chocolate Shooter in his factory in Bruges, February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone poses with his Chocolate Shooter in his factory in Bruges, February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone displays his Chocolate Shooter in his factory in Bruges, February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone snorts cocoa powder off his Chocolate Shooter in his factory in Bruges, February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
A Chocolate Shooter is displayed on a cocoa bean in the factory of Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone in Bruges, February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone snorts cocoa powder off his Chocolate Shooter in his factory in Bruges February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
The Chocolate Shooter is displayed in the factory of Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone in Bruges, February 3, 2015. When Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone created a chocolate-sniffing device for a Rolling Stones party in 2007, he never imagined demand would stretch much beyond the rock 'n' roll scene. But, seven years later, he has sold 25,000 of them. Inspired by a device his grandfather used to propel tobacco snuff up his nose, Persoone created a 'Chocolate Shooter' to deliver a hit of Dominican Republic or Peruvian cocoa powder, mixed with mint and either ginger or raspberry. Picture taken on February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (BELGIUM - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
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Some clubs, like Lucid in Berlin, even offer the cocoa to party goers in place of alcohol.

"We have local artisans and culinary adventurers serving various high vibe medicines such as raw Cacao, super-food smoothies, herbal concoctions, vegan cuisine and much more," their website reads.

Lucid organizer Ruby May told OZY she mixes 18 lbs of cocoa for the night with honey, agave syrup and cinnamon to give users an even more aromatic experience.

"It's like a smooth, sensual hug in a cup," she said.

While advocates claim this is a safe and legal way to get high, medical experts aren't so sure, Yahoo News reported.

"Snorting chocolate powder is not safe, because the powder is perceived by the nose as a foreign toxic substance," said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Perhaps ravers should just stick to the old fashioned method of eating it as candy.

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