Rare condition causes baby in India to go through puberty

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

Rare Condition Causes Baby In India To Go Through Puberty

Puberty typically begins during the teen or pre-teen years, but a child in India has begun to display the signs at a shockingly early age.

The Hindustan Times is reporting that the boy's parents noticed their baby was abnormally tall with overly developed genitals when he was just six months old.

They took him to the doctor a year later; by that time he also had hair on his face and body, a changing voice, and "fully developed sexual organs."

According to Mirror, the boy was diagnosed with precocious puberty, a rare disease one pediatrician said he sees about "once every 10 years."

Because of the condition, the child has the amount of testosterone typically found in a 25-year-old man, notes the Daily Mail.

Thankfully, his doctor did not find a tumor, which is not only a common cause of the disorder but can further complicate the condition. The child was put on a program to suppress the hormones.

Without treatment, children with precocious puberty have been known to experience mental trauma, behave violently, and stop growing once they've reached a height of 3 to 4 feet, according to the Hindustan Times.

RELATED: Brazilian twins, one with Zika microcephaly and one without

20 PHOTOS
Brazilian twins, one with Zika microcephaly and one without
See Gallery
Rare condition causes baby in India to go through puberty
Five-month-old twins Laura (R) and Lucas lie on a bed at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (R), 25, stands next to her mother Manyara (C), 46, who holds her five-month-old granddaughter Laura, as Paulo (L), 8, holds his five-month-old brother Lucas at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (L), 25, holds her five-month-old twins, Laura (R) and Lucas at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Five-month-old twins, Laura (L) and Lucas lie in a buggy at an entrance of their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura as her twin brother Lucas (R), lies in a buggy at an entrance of their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura as she uses her mobile phone at the end of an evaluation session with a physiotherapist at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A physiotherapist gestures as Jaqueline (R), 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura during an evaluation session at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (R), 25, holds her five-month-old son Lucas while her mother Manyara (L), 46, holds her five-month-old granddaughter Laura at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (L), 25, and her five-month-old daughter Laura (C) are seen during a session with a physiotherapist at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old son Lucas as she gives a pacifier to her five-month-old daughter Laura at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (C), 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura, as she takes a selfie with her children Gabrielle (2nd L), 4, and Paulo (R), 8, and her mother Manyara (L), 46, who holds five-month-old Lucas in front of their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Five-month-old Laura undergoes a medical test at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 28, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A physiotherapist exercises five-month-old Laura during an evaluation session at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura as they wait for a session with a physiotherapist at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Five-month-old Laura gets her head measured by the neurologist, Maria Leal Santos, at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, bathes her five-month-old daughter Laura at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition.. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Five-month-old twins, Laura (L) and Lucas lie in their bed at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (C), 25, breastfeeds her five-month-old daughter Laura as a doctor (back) holds five-month-old Lucas during a medical test at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 28, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Paulo (C), 8, holds his five-month-old sister Laura as his grandmother Manyara (back), 46, holds her five-month-old grandson Lucas at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Read Full Story

People are Reading