JetBlue passenger forced to change after crew decided her shorts were too short

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Talker At 10: Passenger's Clothing Questioned

There may not be an official dress code for the skies, but that doesn't mean anything goes.

A JetBlue passenger recently learned that at Logan Airport, when a gate agent asked her to change before being allowed to board her flight to Seattle.

Maggie McMuffin, a Burlesque performer in Seattle, says she was told she "needed to put something else on or I would not be allowed to board the flight."

"I was told it was the pilot's final say so these are not official rules that can be broken," McMuffin told KIRO7 in Seattle. "I felt very disrespected."

Since she wasn't carrying anything else to cover up, she found some $22 sleep trunks in an airport store, which she put on before boarding.

Photo: Twitter

The airline is standing behind the crew's decision, however they are reimbursing McMuffin for the cost of the trunks as well as a $200 flight voucher.

"The gate and on board crew discussed the customer's clothing and determined that the burlesque shorts may offend other families on the flight," a JetBlue spokesman told KIRO7.

"While the customer was not denied boarding, the crew members politely asked if she could change. The customer agreed and continued on the flight without interruption. We support our crew members' discretion to make these difficult decisions, and we decided to reimburse the customer for the cost of the new shorts and offered a credit for future flight as a good will gesture."

While there isn't exactly a dress code for JetBlue — or any other U.S. carrier — the carrier's contract of carriage does include a clause about proper attire under the conditions in which a passenger would be refused.

"Persons whose conduct is or has been known to be disorderly, abusive, offensive, threatening, intimidating, violent, or whose clothing is lewd, obscene, or patently offensive," it says.

Whether someone's short shorts are lewd, obscene or patently offensive is, of course, somewhat up to the beholder.

Also, check out these amazing first class seats below:

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JetBlue passenger forced to change after crew decided her shorts were too short
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