Facebook is tracking your private messages

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We've mentioned before that Facebook is tracking you more than you realize (click here to see how). Whenever you like or share something, or whenever you click on a photo or article - all of that information is recorded. It's factored into Facebook's algorithms, which then present you with similar content, and targeted ads.

How the algorithm works is something only Facebook developers know. But the company makes a great effort to ensure users know they can adjust their privacy settings to control what data Facebook can and cannot collect.

A California man named Matthew Campbell, however, has come forward claiming that his private messages had been scanned and sold to outside companies as advertising data. Because of this, Campbell is suing the social media giant.

In his statement, Campbell claimed that Facebook scanned hyperlinks that were included in private conversations in the Facebook Messenger app. He suspected that the information was then compiled with data from other users who shared similar content previously. This data, according to the suit claims, was then sold to third-party companies to be used for advertising.

Interestingly enough, Campbell isn't demanding a financial payout as part of the lawsuit. Instead, he's asking for "injunctive and declaratory relief," which is a fancy way of saying "cease and desist."

So far, Facebook is standing behind their actions, claiming that their scanning practices were entirely legal. However, representatives of the company did release a statement that said it looked forward to resolving the claims as quickly as possible.

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