Dr. Heimlich, 96, uses maneuver he invented to save choking victim

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At 96, Henry Heimlich Finally Got the Chance to Use His Own Maneuver

At 96, Henry Heimlich thought he would never use the maneuver he invented to save a life.

That changed last Monday, when the doctor came to the aid of one of his fellow retirement home citizens.

Heimlich was enjoying a steak dinner at the Dupree House senior living facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, when he noticed the 87-year-old Patty Ris choking on her hamburger, according to CNN.

Heimlich jumped up, spun Ris around, and began the lifesaving technique he invented in 1974 to dislodge food trapped in a victim's airways. After three forceful thrusts, Ris coughed up the meat. The Heimlich maneuver proved successful.

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Dr. Heimlich, 96, uses maneuver he invented to save choking victim
In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Dr. Henry Heimlich holds his memoirs prior to being interviewed at his home in Cincinnati. Heimlich is known for developing the Heimlich maneuver that has been used to clear obstructions from the windpipes of choking victims around the world for four decades. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Dr. Henry Heimlich is interviewed in his home, in Cincinnati, in front of a silk robe that was given to him during his travels in China. Heimlich is known for developing the Heimlich maneuver that has been used to clear obstructions from the windpipes of choking victims around the world for four decades. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Dr. Henry Heimlich describes the maneuver he developed to help clear obstructions from the windpipes of choking victims, while being interviewed at his home in Cincinnati. Heimlich hopes his recently published memoir will preserve the technique that has made his name a household word. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Dr. Henry Heimlich describes the maneuver he developed to help clear obstructions from the windpipes of choking victims, while being interviewed at his home in Cincinnati. Heimlich hopes his recently published memoir will preserve the technique that has made his name a household word. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
** FILE ** Dr. Henry Heimlich speaks before presenting the "Save a Life Award" to Kevin Stephan at Buffalo General Hospital Wednesday June 21, 2006 in Buffalo, N.Y., for performing the Heimlich Maneuver on Penny Brown in a restaurant earlier this year. Coincidentally, Penny Brown saved Kevin Stephan's life 7-years ago by performing Cardio Pulmonary Resucitation at a baseball game . (AP Photo/John Hickey)
Dr. Henry Heimlich speaks with Penny Brown and Kevin Stephan, after Stephan received the "Save a Life" award at Buffalo General Hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., Wednesday, June 21, 2006, for performing the Heimlich Maneuver on Brown in a restaurant earlier this year. In 1999, Brown, a nurse, performed CPR on Stephan after his heart stopped beating when he was struck in the chest by a baseball bat. (AP Photo/John Hickey)
Dr. Henry Heimlich goes to embrace Kevin Stephan as Penny Brown looks on, after Stephan received the "Save a Life" award from Heimlich at Buffalo General Hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., Wednesday, June 21, 2006, for performing the Heimlich Maneuver on Brown in a restaurant earlier this year . In 1999, Brown, a nurse, performed CPR on Stephan after his heart stopped beating when he was struck in the chest by a baseball bat. (AP Photo/John Hickey)
Dr. Henry J. Heimlich poses in Lynn, Mass., August 11, 1986 with 5-years-old Brent Meldrum, left, who saved the life of his friend, Tanya Branden, 6, when he dislodged a piece of candy caught in her throat using the technique he had seen on a TV program. (AP Photo/Carol Francaville)
Dr. Henry Heimlich, right, developer of the Heimlich Maneuver applies a little too much pressure to Dorothy Allen of Halifax , Mass. during a demonstration December 5, 1985 in Boston. Heimlich was in Boston to honor 53 people who successfully performed the maneuver to save the lives of choking victims. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Dr. Henry J. Heimlich of Cincinnati, Ohio, creator of the Heimlich Maneuver used to save victims choking to death on food or other objects, poses with Melissa Wertheim, 10, of Bellingham, Mass., November 29, 1984, at an awards ceremony in Newton, Mass. held to honor those in Massachusetts who successfully used the maneuver to save a life. Melissa saved her mother, Joan Wertheim, who had started choking on a piece of meat at dinner. (AP Photo)
Dr. Henry Heimlich holds a photograph in his office April 12, 1984 in Cincinnati of the late Gen. Fu Tso Yi, with whom he was friend while in China during World War II. Dr. Heimlieh, developer of the Heimlieh Manuever and several surgical procedures, has been invited back to China for three weeks. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Dr. Henry Heimlich of Cinncinnati, Ohio, right, and Mayor Edward Koch demonstrate how a chocking victim should signal for help August 7, 1981 at New York's City Hall during Heimlich's discussion of his Heimlich Maneuver. Mayor Koch was aided by the maneuver last week during a meal. (AP Photo/Suzanne Vlamis)
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"God put me in the seat right next to you Dr. Heimlich so you could save my life," Ris recounted to the BBC. "Because I was gone. I couldn't breathe for a long time."

According to The Cincinnati Enquirer, it was the first time he's used his namesake maneuver to save a life. "I kinda felt wonderful about it, saving that girl. I knew [the Heimlich maneuver] was working around the world. I just felt a satisfaction," he said.

This isn't the first choking incident at Dupree House. Perry Gaines, Dupree's maitre d', told The Enquirer he's had to perform the Heimlich twice this year. When he heard a resident was choking, he rushed into the dining hall, only to see Dr. Heimlich already at work.

"Sometimes residents try to help in medical situations but we tend to discourage it," Gaines recounted. "But I noticed it was Dr. Heimlich and he was doing the maneuver ... I stepped back and let Dr. Heimlich continue on."

Who better?

Read original story Dr. Heimlich, 96, Uses Maneuver He Invented To Save Choking Victim At TheWrap


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