Donald Trump reacts to Obama's visit to Hiroshima: 'Why doesn't he discuss Pearl Harbor?'

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Trump dismisses Obama's visit to Hiroshima

Donald Trump on Saturday invoked the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor in reaction to President Barack Obama's Friday speech in Hiroshima, the site of the world's first atomic bombing.

In a tweet, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee criticized Obama for visiting the site while neglecting to mention the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

"Does President Obama ever discuss the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor while he's in Japan? Thousands of American lives lost. #MDW," Trump wrote.

The country and top Japanese leaders have on numerous occasions expressed remorse for the nation's aggression in the lead-up to World War II.

Photos from Hiroshima:

41 PHOTOS
Looking back: Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima
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Donald Trump reacts to Obama's visit to Hiroshima: 'Why doesn't he discuss Pearl Harbor?'
FILE - In this Sept. 4, 1945 file photo, the remains of a factory are seen, upper left, in the southern Japanese city of Nagasaki, gutted by the Aug. 9 atomic bombing. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo/File)
FILE- In this Sept. 5, 1945, file photo, the skeleton of a Catholic Church, foreground, and an unidentified building, center, are all that remaining the blast center area after the atomic bomb of Hiroshima, Japan. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo, File)
This desolated area, with only some buildings standing here and there is what was left of Hiroshima, Japan, Sept. 3, 1945 after the first atomic bomb was dropped. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Aug. 9, 1945 file photo, a mushroom cloud rises moments after the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, southern Japan. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo/File)
FILE- In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo, smoke rises around 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo, File)
FILE- In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo, aboard the cruiser Augusta, President Harry S. Truman, with a radio at hand, reads reports of the first atomic bomb raid on Japan, while en route home from the Potsdam conference. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo, File)
FILE- In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo, survivors of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare are seen as they await emergency medical treatment in Hiroshima, Japan. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo, File)
FILE- In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo, shortly after the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the United States over the Japanese city of Hiroshima, survivors are seen as they receive emergency treatment by military medics. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over. (AP Photo, File)
Hiroshima, first enemy city to feel the American atomic bomb, in this reconnaissance view made before the attack on August 6, 19456. The city of 318,000 populations is on the south-western end of Honshu, one of the main Jap home islands. Large guns, tanks, machine and aircraft parts were reported manufactured there. (AP Photo)
Ikimi Kikkawa shows keloid scars following the healing of burns caused by the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima at the end of the second World War. She was seen at the Red Cross hospital there, June 5, 1947. (AP Photo)
An Allied war correspondent stands amid the ruins of Hiroshima, Japan in 1945, just weeks after the city was leveled by an atomic bomb. (AP Photo)
Photo from the U.S. Army Signal Corps showing the devastation left after the first atomic bomb was droppped on Hiroshima on August 6 1945. No precise date given for the photo which was taken some time not long after the explosion. (AP PHOTO)
An aerial view of Hiroshima, some time after the atom bomb was dropped on this Japanese city. (AP Photo)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, a victim of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare is seen in September 1945, at the Ujina Branch of the First Army Hospital in Hiroshima, Japan. The thermic rays emitted by the explosion burned the pattern of this woman's kimono upon her back. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)
This photo-diagram, based on diagram issued by Army Air Force on August 9, 1945, locates areas damaged in Japanese homeland city of Hiroshima by first atomic bomb dropped by U.S. Army Air Forces. Large circle is drawn on diameter of 19,000 feet. Shaded areas indicate devastates sectors, according to information based on intelligence reports. Key to numbers, with percentage of total destruction where available: 1- Army Transport Base -25 percent, 2- Army Ordnance Depot,3- Army Food Depot-35 percent,4- Army Clothing Depot -85 percent, 5- E. Hiroshima RR Station -30 percent, 6- Unidentified Industry -90 percent, 7- Sumitomo Rayon Plant -25 percent, 8- Kinkwa Rayon Mill -10 percent, 9- Teikoku Textile Mill-100 percent, 10- Power Plant -?, 12- Electric RR power Station -100 percent, 13- Electric Power Generator-100 percent, 14- Telephone Company-100 percent, 15- Gas Works -100 percent, 16- Hiroshima RR Station -100 percent, 17- Unidentified RR Station-100 percent, 18- Bridge, debris loaded, intact, 19- Bridge, one-fourth missing, 20- Large bridge, shattered, intact, 21- Bridge, large hole, west side, 22- Bridge, intact, banks caved in, 23- Bridge, intact, debris covered, 24- Both bridges intact, 25- Bridge, destroyed, 26- Bridge, severely damaged, 27-Bridge destroyed, 28-Bridge, shattered, inoperative, 29- Bridge, intact, slight damage, 30- Bridge, intact, severely damaged. (AP Photo)
The landscape of Hiroshima, Japan, shows widespread rubble and debris in an aerial view Sept. 5, 1945, one month after the atomic bomb was dropped. The atomic blast of Aug. 6, 1945, killed an estimated 140,000 people by the end of 1945. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)
The skeleton of a Catholic Church, foreground, and an unidentified building, centre, are all that remaining the blast centre area after the atomic bomb of Hiroshima, Japan on August 5. This is the first ground picture of atomic bomb damage in Hiroshima, on Sept. 5, 1945. (AP Photo)
An allied correspondent examines the remains of what was once a barber shop in Hiroshima, Sept. 8, 1945, a little over a month after the atomic bomb was dropped over this Japanese city. Tiled sink is all that remains to identify the destroyed business. (AP Photo)
The atomic bomb attack on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, left this mass of twisted steel and this gutted building standing in acres of desolation, Sept. 8, 1945. (AP Photo
Skeletons of trees dominate the landscape in Hiroshima, Sept. 8, 1945, left in ruins after the world's first atomic bomb attack. Domei News agency reported today that 126,000 were killed in the attack on this once industrial city. (AP Photo
Two people walk on a cleared path through the destruction resulting from the Aug. 6 detonation of the first atomic bomb, Sept. 8, 1945. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force)
A Japanese man and woman, victims of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, sit in a damaged bank building converted into a hospital near the centre of the town in Japan on Oct. 6, 1945. The woman’s face is severely scarred by the tremendous heat generated by the explosion. The burns show a pronounced reddish cast. (AP Photo)
A Japanese woman and her child casualties in the atom raid in Hiroshima, lie on a blanket on the floor of a damaged bank building converted into a hospital and located near the centre of the devastated town, in Japan, on Oct. 6, 1945. (AP Photo)
This photo shows the total destruction of the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on April 1, 1946. The atomic bomb known as "Little Boy" was dropped over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945 during World War II from the U.S. AAF Superfortress bomber plane called "Enola Gay." (AP Photo)
Tetsu Terada, city chairman of Hiroshima participates in ground-breaking ceremony on August 16, 1947, as the city plants memorial trees in the area where thousands died in the atom-bombing of the city, August 6, 1945. Ceremony was part of a three-day peace festival marking second anniversary of the bombing. (AP Photo/Charles Gorry)
Ninoshima Island off Hiroshima, Japan, where bodies of the atomic bomb blast in 1945 were buried, Oct. 19, 1947. (AP Photo/Charles P. Gorry)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Hiroshima after the dropping of the atom bomb in August 1945. USAF photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Survivors of the explosion of the Atom bomb at Hiroshima 1945 suffering the effects of radiation. ICRC photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The concrete section was burnt and melted, leaving the steel frame exposed against the sky when the a-bomb exploded above the dome on August 6, 1945. The dome which was a majestic and beautiful piece of architecture before the bombardment is the only atomic-bombed building in the city allowed to stand. The dome was reinforced by Japanese architectural specialists this year to be preserved as a grim reminder of that tragic moment. In the background a stainless steel Buddhist pagoda, a memorial for the a-bomb victims built in 1966, can be seen on August 6, 1970. The pagoda enshrines Buddha’s ashes dedicated by Ceylonese Buddhist association. (AP Photo)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, firestorms after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
1945: Atomic bomb damage at Hiroshima with a burnt out fire engine amidst the rubble. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
World War II, Human shadow on bank steps, in Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945 Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, shadow of a tap on a pipeline at Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
6th August 1945: The twisted wreckage of a theatre, located 800 metres from the epicentre of the atomic explosion at Hiroshima. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN: This September 1945 file picture shows the remaining of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industry Promotion Building, known as the Atomic-Bomb Dome, which was later preserved as a monument. (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)
View of Hiroshima city on August 6, 1970. (AP Photo)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 26: Atomic Bomb Dome stands among fallen autumn leaves at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on November 26, 2014 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images)
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Obama did not apologize for the US' decision to use nuclear weapons, but he was nonetheless rebuked by some conservatives for his decision to visit the nuclear memorial site at all.

In his speech, Obama criticized the colonial motivations that put Japan on the path to war with the US in the first place.

"The war grew out of the same base instinct for domination or conquest that had caused conflicts among the simplest tribes, an old pattern amplified by new capabilities and without new constraints," Obama said.

Obama also warned of the ability for mankind to "destroy itself" with nuclear weapons, and asserted that the world would be better off without them.

"We must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without them," Obama said of nuclear weapons.

He added: "We may not realize this goal in my lifetime, but persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe."

During his trip, Obama met with several survivors of the 1945 atomic bombing, who were children at the time. The final death toll from the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki is estimated at just below 200,000 people, the majority of whom were civilians, as well as forced Korean laborers and a small number of American troops being held as prisoners of war.

Trump has been a critic of the close relationship between the US and Japan that has been rebuilt over the past three-plus decades. The presumptive Republican nominee has asserted that the Japanese — along with countries like Mexico, China, and South Korea — have unfairly benefited from globalization to America's detriment. He has also accused Japan of deliberately weakening its currency to stimulate exports.

Photos from the attack on Pearl Harbor:

26 PHOTOS
Attack on Pearl Harbor - Dec. 7, 1941
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Donald Trump reacts to Obama's visit to Hiroshima: 'Why doesn't he discuss Pearl Harbor?'
** FILE ** In this U.S. Navy file photo, a small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. Two men can be seen on the superstructure, upper center. The mast of the USS Tennessee is beyond the burning West Virginia. On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese Imperial Navy navigator Takeshi Maeda guided his Kate bomber to Pearl Harbor and fired a torpedo that helped sink the USS West Virginia. On Sunday Dec. 3, 2006, Maeda and John Rauschkolb a crewman aboard the West Virginia at the time of the attack, met face-to-face for the first time and shook hands. (AP Photo)
The destroyer USS Shaw explodes after being hit by bombs during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, December 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
** FILE ** American ships burn during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo. (AP Photo, File)
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, December 7, 1941, United States, Japan - World War II, Narional archives. Washington. (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
In this image provided by the U.S. Department of Defense, destroyers in drydock at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii are battered by bombs after Japanese sneak attack on Dec. 7, 1941. Background in dock is battleship Pennsylvania, which suffered only minor damage. Destroyers are Downes, left, and Cassin, right. Machinery and fittings were transferred to new hulls and the destroyers were never stricken from Navy's active list. (AP Photo/U.S. Department of Defense)
The battleship USS West Virginia is seen afire after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, smoke rises from the battleship USS Arizona as it sinks during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Saturday marks the 72nd anniversary of the attack that brought the United States into World War II. (AP File Photo)
US ships 'Virginia' and 'Tennessee' on fire after the Pearl Harbor attack, December 7, 1941, World War II, Washington, National archives, . (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
Officers' wives, investigating explosion and seeing smoke pall in distance on Dec. 7, 1941, heard neighbor Mary Naiden, then an Army hostess who took this picture, exclaim "There are red circles on those planes overhead. They are Japanese!" Realizing war had come, the two women, stunned, start toward quarters. (AP Photo/Mary Naiden)
This is the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin announcing the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
U.S. soldiers at the Presidio in San Francisco gather around the bed of one of their comrades, Dec. 7, 1941, to read an extra reporting of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, by the Japanese. (AP Photo/John Young)
This picture, taken by a Japanese photographer, shows how American ships are clustered together before the surprise Japanese aerial attack on Pear Harbor, HI., on Sunday morning, Dec. 8, 1941. Minutes later the full impact of the assault was felt and Pearl Harbor became a flaming target. (AP Photo)
An undamaged light cruiser steams out past the burning USS Arizona and takes to sea with the rest of the fleet during the Japanese aerial attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)
Torpedoed and bombed by the Japanese, the battleship USS West Virginia begins to sink after suffering heavy damage, center, while the USS Maryland, left, is still afloat in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. The capsized USS Oklahoma is at right. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)
FILE-- The infamous attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The USS Arizona is pictured in flames after the Japanese attack. On Sunday, Dec. 7, 1997, the 56th anniversary of the attack that drew the United States into World War II, two Navy men who survived the battle are scheduled to have their ashes scattered on the waters above the battleship. It is an honor extended to those who survived the attack while serving on another ship, or those who served on the Arizona before the attack.(AP Photo/U.S. Navy,File)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army, a pall of smoke rises from fires started during the Japanese bombing of Hickam Field at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Dec. 7, 1941. (AP Photo/U.S. Army)
As the deck of the capsized battleship USS Oklahoma breaks water, damage and corrosion to her superstructure are shown on May 24, 1943 at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Oklahoma capsized after being hit with torpedoes in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. (AP Photo)
A Japanese dive bomber goes into its last dive as it heads toward the ground in flames after it was hit by Naval anti-aircraft fire during surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this undated file photo, wreckage identified by the U.S. Navy as a Japanese torpedo plane was salvaged from the bottom of Pearl Harbor following the surprise attack Dec. 7, 1941. An excavation crew recently made a startling discovery at the bottom of Pearl Harbor when it unearthed a skull that archeologists suspect is from a Japanese pilot who died in the historic attack. Archaeologist Jeff Fong of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Pacific described the discovery to The Associated Press and the efforts under way to identify the skull. He said the early analysis has made him "75 percent sure" that the skull belongs to a Japanese pilot. (AP Photo, file)
A mass of twisted metal wreckage lay along a Honolulu street after the city had been attacked by Japanese planes Dec. 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
U.S. Navy seamen examine the wreckage of a Japanese torpedo plane shot down at Pearl harbor during the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
The wing of a Japanese bomber shot down on the grounds of the Naval Hospital at Honolulu, Hawaii, Dec. 7, 1941. (AP Photo)
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, World War II, Washington, National archives, . (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
Firemen and civilians rush to the scene with fire hoses to save homes and stores in the Japanese and Chinese sections of Honolulu, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941. As Japanese aviators rained bombs on Pearl Harbor, starting war in the Pacific, offshore properties are also wrecked and burned. (AP Photo)
Selling papers on Dec. 7, 1941 at Times Square in New York City, announcing that Japan has attacked U.S. bases in the Pacific. (AP Photo/Robert Kradin)
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More alarmingly to some US and Japanese foreign-policy experts, the real-estate magnate also suggested ending the decades-long strategic agreement between the US and Japan that allows the US to maintain bases in the Japanese archipelago in exchange for US military protection in the case of an attack on Japan.

As Foreign Policy has reported, most Americans are content with the state of the US-Japan relationship, though the relationship is less popular among Americans who identify as Republican.

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