An activist wants you to burn the Confederate flag on Memorial Day

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Activist Wants People to Burn Confederate Flags for Memorial Day

Most Americans celebrate Memorial Day with a delicious barbecue. But here's something some are adding to their grill list: the Confederate flag.

South Florida activist John Sims is leading an effort to turn Memorial Day into Confederate flag-burning day, reported Think Progress on Sunday. Sims previously organized 13 small flag-burning events across the 13 states of the Confederacy earlier this month, according to IBT, with the justification "the Confederate flag is the N-word on a pole."

See pro-Confederate flag supporters:

21 PHOTOS
Confederate flag supporters protest at South Carolina statehouse
See Gallery
An activist wants you to burn the Confederate flag on Memorial Day
Pro-confederate flag demonstrators Alice Horky wears confederate flag cowboy boots as she protests atop the South Carolina State House steps in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Jamie Lewis (R) stands over as a fellow demonstrator (C) takes a picture of her six-month old son Weston Rich (L) holding a confederate flag during a rally outside the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-confederate flag demonstrators Jim Horky (R) and his wife Alice (L) stand outside the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Protesters argue with a group of demonstrators on the grounds of the South Carolina State House while calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Pro-confederate flag demonstrators walk down the steps of the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Ben Crosby, of Walterboro, South Carolina joins a group of demonstrators on the steps of the South Carolina State House while calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Hugh Crawford of Lexington, South Carolina speaks with his daughter Holli Crawford, age 7, as they join a group of demonstrators on the grounds of the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
A pro-confederate flag demonstrator drives by chanting as others wave the confederate flag outside the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Jamie Lewis, of Aiken, South Carolina, and her 6 month old son, Weston Rich, join a group of demonstrators on the grounds of the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Demonstrators protest at the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Pro-confederate flag demonstrator William Wells (C) chants 'heritage not hate' next to an anti-confederate flag demonstrator (R) outside the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Alice Dixie Horky, of Greenville, South Carolina joins a group of demonstrators on the steps of the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Ben Crosby, of Walterboro, South Carolina joins a group of demonstrators at the South Carolina State House while calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Demonstrators protest at the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Storm clouds gather as pro-confederate flag demonstrators gather outside the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-confederate flag demonstrators march to the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. There has been a growing clamor for the flag -- branded 'a reminder of systemic oppression and racist subjugation' by President Barack Obama on Friday -- to be removed from the grounds of the state house in Columbia. Once flown by the rebel army of the slave-owning South, the confederate flag is seen by some as a symbol of regional heritage, but by many more as an ugly reminder of racism's cruel legacy. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Demonstrators protest at the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Katie Crum, of Columbia, South Carolina joins a group of demonstrators on the grounds of the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Jaluladin Abdul-Hamib (C) argues with a group of demonstrators on the grounds of the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 27: Hugh Crawford of Lexington, South Carolina speaks with his daughter Holli Crawford, age 7, as they join a group of demonstrators on the grounds of the South Carolina State House calling for the Confederate flag to remain on the State House grounds June 27, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Earlier in the week South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley expressed support for removing the Confederate flag from the State House grounds in the wake of the nine murders at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Now, he's providing downloadable "Burn and Bury" kits for people unwilling or unable to put forward the cash to purchase a real Confederate flag, with the intention of making the process as easy as possible, according to Think Progress.

Sims uploaded a video remix of a burning Confederate flag, dubbed over with the words of an op-ed he wrote for the Huffington Post on the subject.

Southern heritage groups like the Sons of Confederate Veterans "have failed to recognized the unredeemable nature of the Confederate flag as symbol of Southern heritage," Sims told Think Progress. "And to deny this flag's connection to American white supremacy and fear of the loss of white privilege is insane. I challenge the Sons of Confederate Veterans to come correct and acknowledge that the Confederate flag should be retired as an artifact. And after that they should help advocate for reparations for slavery."

He added he hoped Burn and Bury Memorial Day would "ritualistically confront through reflection and catharsis, the pain and trauma of a very horrific part of American history."

After a white supremacist named Dylann Storm Roof entered the historically African-American Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina on July 17, 2015, murdering nine congregants and leaving behind a racist online manifesto, activists successfully had the Confederate flag pulled from the grounds of the South Carolina State House.

While advocates for the flag often cite its historical value, the symbol is deeply part and parcel of the racist ideology of the Confederacy which created it and the slave economy of the antebellum South. One white variant of the flag, the second Confederate battle flag, the "Stainless Banner," was explicitly designed by its creator William Thompson as a "WHITE MAN'S FLAG" [sic] symbolizing the "heaven ordained supremacy of the white man over the inferior or colored race."

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners