Sugar substitute may increase risk of type 2 diabetes

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Sugar Substitute May Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Artificial sweeteners do cut out calories, but the risk factors associated with them may not be worth it.

Growing knowledge of the health risks correlated with a high sugar intake and obesity has lead to a rise in the popularity of no-calorie and low-calorie sweeteners.

However, while cutting calories can aid in weight loss, replacing natural sugars with artificial sweeteners can have the opposite desired effect and actually increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in already overweight adults.

A new study out of York University in Canada reports that people who regularly use sugar substitutes have difficulty managing stable glucose levels naturally.

RELATED: Tips on helping prevent diabetes

7 PHOTOS
Preventing Diabetes
See Gallery
Sugar substitute may increase risk of type 2 diabetes
In this photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, Hayden Murphy, 13, sits for a photo with his medicine at his home in Plainfield, Ill. Hayden is among more than 400 children and adults participating in U.S. government-funded international research investigating whether experimental insulin capsules can prevent or at least delay Type 1 diabetes. To enroll, participants must first get bad news: results of a blood test showing their chances for developing the disease are high. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
In this photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, Weston Murphy, 5, who has Type 1 diabetes, pricks his finger to test his blood at his home in Plainfield, Ill. His oldest brother is among more than 400 children and adults participating in U.S. government-funded international research investigating whether experimental insulin capsules can prevent or at least delay Type 1 diabetes. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
This photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, shows insulin pills taken by Hayden Murphy, 13, who is participating in a study in Plainfield, Ill. to try to prevent or at least delay Type 1 diabetes. In Type 1, the pancreas stops making insulin, a blood sugar-regulating hormone that helps the body convert sugar in food into energy. Treatment is lifetime replacement insulin, usually via injections or a small pump. In Type 2, the body can't make proper use of insulin. It can sometimes be treated with a healthy diet and exercise. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
In this photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, Weston Murphy, 5, who has Type 1 diabetes, checks his blood glucose meter at his home in Plainfield, Ill. In Type 1, the pancreas stops making insulin, a blood sugar-regulating hormone that helps the body convert sugar in food into energy. Treatment is lifetime replacement insulin, usually via injections or a small pump. In Type 2, the body can't make proper use of insulin. It can sometimes be treated with a healthy diet and exercise. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
In this photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, Hayden Murphy, 13, right, holds his brother, Weston Murphy, 5, who has Type 1 diabetes, at their home in Plainfield, Ill. Hayden is at high risk for Type 1 diabetes, and is participating in a study to find out if insulin pills may prevent or at least delay its onset. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
This photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, shows the infusion set of Weston Murphy, 5, background, who has Type 1 diabetes, on the dining table at his home in Plainfield, Ill. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin, a blood sugar-regulating hormone that helps the body convert sugar in food into energy. Treatment is lifetime replacement insulin, usually via injections or a small pump. In Type 2, the body can't make proper use of insulin. It can sometimes be treated with a healthy diet and exercise. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


Since glucose intolerance is the basis of type 2 diabetes, this puts people who are regularly swapping out natural sugar at a greater risk for developing the disease.

Of the 2,500 adults observed in the study, the prime culprit in causing this problem was aspartame, the ingredient used in NutraSweet.

Researchers did not find this effect with saccharin but report that more testing is needed.

However, if you have a sweet tooth, you might want to stick with the real deal from now on.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.