3,800-year-old mummy may be most important ever discovered

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3,800 Year Old Mummy May Be Most Important Ever Discovered

As far as mummies go, we all know the big names like Ramesses, Hatshepsut and, of course, King Tut.

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But archeologists have just discovered a lucky lady who was arguably the most important woman during the Middle Kingdom of Egypt.

At the necropolis of Qubbet el-Hawa, an ancient city near the modern-day city of Aswan, authorities from the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities announced the discovery of Lady Sattjeni.

Her remains are 3,800 years old and were first discovered by Spanish archeologists from the University of Jaén in Spain.

"The body was originally wrapped in linen and deposited in two wooden coffins made of Lebanon cedar," reports Nasr Salama, the general director of Aswan.

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The wood is in such good condition that Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities should be able to find out the year in which the wood was cut.

What makes Lady Sattjeni so remarkable is that she outlived all the male members of her family, which put her in the position of holding all the dynastic rights to rule her family's city-island of Elephantine.

This discovery will help archeologists piece together the genealogy of the Elephantine rule, as much is still unknown about its leaders.

Finally, a mummy story that ends in hope, not a curse.

RELATED: See Egypt's bent pyramid:

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Egypt's bent pyramid
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3,800-year-old mummy may be most important ever discovered
(GERMANY OUT) Bent Pyramid of Pharaoh Snofru, Dahshur, Egypt (Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
EGYPT - SEPTEMBER 30: Pyramid of Sneferu, known as the Bent Pyramid (rhomboidal or double-diamond sloped pyramid), Dahshur Necropolis, Memphis (Unesco World Heritage List, 1979), Egypt. Egyptian civilisation, Old Kingdom, Dynasty IV. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Tuesday March 24, 2009 file photo, The 4,500-year-old Bent Pyramid is seen in Dahshour near Cairo, Egypt. An international heritage research group says scientists will begin analyzing radiographic muons, or cosmic particles, collected from the ancient Bent Pyramid built by the Pharaoh Snefru. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)
CORRECTING NAME OF PYRAMID A picture taken on April 19, 2015 shows an aerial view of the bent pyramid of Dahshur, a royal necropolis located in the desert on the west bank of the Nile river, just south of Cairo. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)
(GERMANY OUT) Police on Camel at Bent Pyramid of Pharaoh Snofru, Dahshur, Egypt (Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
FILE - This file Aug. 19, 2011 photo shows tourists as they leave the Bent Pyramid at Dahshur, about 25 miles south of Cairo, Egypt. An international heritage research group says scientists will begin analyzing radiographic muons, or cosmic particles, collected from the ancient Bent Pyramid built by the Pharaoh Snefru. (AP Photo/Coralie Carlson, File)
Sneferu's Bent Pyramid, Dahshur, Al Jizah, Egypt (Photo by: Insights/UIG via Getty Images)
EGYPT - SEPTEMBER 30: Pyramid of Sneferu, known as the Bent Pyramid (rhomboidal or double-diamond sloped pyramid), Dahshur Necropolis, Memphis (Unesco World Heritage List, 1979), Egypt. Egyptian civilisation, Old Kingdom, Dynasty IV. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
Sneferu's Bent Pyramid, Dahshur, Al Jizah, Egypt. (Photo by: Insights/UIG via Getty Images)
the ancient Dahshur Pyramid is silhouetted in Dahshur, Egypt, Monday, March 16, 2009. Travellers to Egypt will soon be able to explore the inner chambers of the 4,500-year-old "bent" pyramid, known for its oddly shaped profile, while the inner chambers of the Red pyramid, pictured, also built by 4th dynasty founder Pharaoh Sneferu, are already accessible to visitors.(AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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