Microsoft to cut nearly 1,800 jobs in mobile

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Microsoft slashing 1,850 smartphone jobs

As smartphone sales continue to plummet for Microsoft, so does the number of Microsoft Mobile employees.

This time, more than 1,800 jobs will be cut, with nearly 1,400 of those cuts happening for Nokia employees at Microsoft Mobile Oy in Finland.

The job cuts are expected to cost the company a whopping $950M, including $200M to be put towards severance payments for laid-off workers.

The mobile business has been quite rocky from Microsoft since they acquitted Nokia's phone business in 2014 for $7.3B, as reported by ABC News.

Last year alone, around 7,800 jobs were cut from mobile.

A look at some of Microsoft's pivotal moments over the last few years:

18 PHOTOS
Microsoft (last updated 9/30/2014)
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Microsoft to cut nearly 1,800 jobs in mobile
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella gestures during the keynote address of the Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014, in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its annual conference for software developers, with new updates to the Windows 8 operating system and upcoming features for Windows Phone and Xbox. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Microsoft corporate vice president Joe Belfiore, of the Operating Systems Group, demonstrates the new Cortana personal assistant during the keynote address of the Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014, in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its annual conference for software developers, with new updates to the Windows 8 operating system and upcoming features for Windows Phone and Xbox. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
This screen shot shows the Windows 8.1 start screen. Seeing sales of smartphones and tablets grow rapidly, Microsoft reshaped its Windows operating system so that PCs came to look, work and feel more like smartphones and tablets. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2001 file photo, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates stands in New York's Times Square to promote the new Windows XP operating system. On Tuesday, April 8, 2014, Microsoft will end support for its still popular Windows XP. With an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the data of major financial institutions to the identities of everyday people in danger if they don’t find a way to upgrade soon. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2006 file photo, the logo for Microsoft Corp.'s Media Center Edition of the Windows XP operating system is displayed on a screen at a CompUSA store in Bellevue, Wash. On Tuesday, April 8, 2014, Microsoft will end support for its still popular Windows XP. With an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the data of major financial institutions to the identities of everyday people in danger if they don’t find a way to upgrade soon. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, left, is greeted by Stephen Elop, right, executive vice president of Nokia, during the keynote address of the Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014, in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its annual conference for software developers, with new updates to the Windows 8 operating system and upcoming features for Windows Phone and Xbox. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Stepen Elop, executive vice president of Nokia shows off his colored shoe while talking about the colors available of the new Nokia Lumia 930 phones during a keynote address at the Microsoft Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014, in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its annual conference for software developers, with new updates to the Windows 8 operating system and upcoming features for Windows Phone and Xbox. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
FILE - In this Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, file photo, a new Microsoft Corp. logo, left, is seen on an exterior wall of a new Microsoft store inside the Prudential Center mall, in Boston. Microsoft is updating its Windows software for cellphones to accommodate larger devices and make it easier for motorists to reduce distractions while driving. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, file photo, a woman walks past laptop computers running Microsoft Windows 8 operating system during its launching ceremony in Hong Kong. Worldwide shipments of personal computers fell during the third quarter of 2013. It is the sixth straight quarter of decline as cheaper tablet computers and smartphones cut into demand, according to market research firms IDC and Gartner Inc. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)
Microsoft corporate vice president Joe Belfiore, right, of the Operating Systems Group, gestures while talking about the apps that will work on the new Windows 8.1 phone during the keynote address of the Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014, in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its annual conference for software developers, with new updates to the Windows 8 operating system and upcoming features for Windows Phone and Xbox. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Microsoft corporate vice president Joe Belfiore, of the Operating Systems Group, holds up a pair of phone using the new Windows 8.1 operating system during the keynote address of the Build Conference Wednesday, April 2, 2014, in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its annual conference for software developers, with new updates to the Windows 8 operating system and upcoming features for Windows Phone and Xbox. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2006 file photo, an upgrade edition of the Microsoft Corp. Windows XP Professional computer operating system is on display at a CompUSA store in Tukwila, Wash. On Tuesday, April 8, 2014, Microsoft will end support for its still popular Windows XP. With an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the data of major financial institutions to the identities of everyday people in danger if they don’t find a way to upgrade soon. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
This July 3, 2014 photo shows Microsoft Corp. signage outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft on Thursday, July 17, 2014 announced it will lay off up to 18,000 workers over the next year. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)
In this photo taken July 3, 2014, a worker walks past a Microsoft Corp. sign outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft on Thursday, July 17, 2014 announced it will lay off up to 18,000 workers over the next year. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)
This photo taken with a fisheye lens on July 3, 2014 shows Microsoft Corp. signage outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft on Thursday, July 17, 2014 announced it will lay off up to 18,000 workers over the next year. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)
In this photo taken July 3, 2014, a worker walks past a Microsoft logo outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)
This photo taken July 3, 2014 shows Windows phones made by HTC and Nokia on display at the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)
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Nearly 26,000 jobs in total have been cut since the Nokia acquisition.

SEE ALSO: Bill Gates says these are the cheapest things that make him the happiest

However, as CNN money reported:

"The company continues to report solid results in its cloud computing, Office 365 and Windows business units."

Though there's been major scaling back in the past two years for the mobile division of the company, this by no means indicates an overall struggle for Microsoft as a company.​

Check out these five books that Microsoft founder Bill Gates wants everyone to read:

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5 books Bill Gates wants you to read
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Microsoft to cut nearly 1,800 jobs in mobile

Seveneves by Neal Stephenson, $12.22

How Not to be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg, $7.88

The Vital Question by Nick Lane, $18.91

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Noah Yuval Harari, $18.51

The Power to Compete by Ryoichi Mikitani and Hiroshi Mikitani, $22.18

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