Harry Reid on Elizabeth Warren serving as Hillary Clinton's VP: 'Hell no'

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Sen. Reid weighs on Trump's veep picks

Hillary Clinton may run into some opposition from her own party if she decides to poach a Democratic senator as her running mate.

In an interview on Monday, MSNBC host Joy Reid asked outgoing Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid whether he supported either Sen. Elizabeth Warren or Sen. Sherrod Brown as potential Clinton running mates.

Harry Reid shot down the idea, pointing out that if Clinton chose a nominee from a Republican-controlled state, then the governor would fill the vacancy, essentially allowing the seat to switch hands.

"If we have a Republican governor in any of those states, the answer is not only no, but hell no," Harry Reid said. "And I would do whatever I can and I think most of my Democratic colleagues here would say the same thing."

He added: "I would yell and scream to stop that."

See Reid through the years:

32 PHOTOS
Harry Reid
See Gallery
Harry Reid on Elizabeth Warren serving as Hillary Clinton's VP: 'Hell no'
Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks on the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, stands next his official portrait during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. Reid, the tart-tongued ex-boxer known for pugilistic rhetoric about Republicans, is marking the end of his 34-year career in Congress with the unveiling of his official portrait that was painted by former Senate staffer Gavin Glakas. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, speaks during a news conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Hillary Clinton pulled out a victory over Bernie Sanders in Nevadas Democratic caucuses that will help right her campaign as both candidates head into a 10-day blitz of crucial contests starting next Saturday in South Carolina.

(Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., leans on a stack of documents pertaining to campaign finance reform during a Capitol Hill news conference Tuesday, December 3, 1996, where the Democratic leadership for the 105th Congress was announced. The documents represent the hearings and legislation involved in campaign finance reform, which Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle of South Dakota said would be the Democrats top priority in the 105th Congress.

(AP Photo/Dennis Cook)

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks with reporters regarding a stop-gap funding bill to avoid a federal government shutdown later this week on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., right, talks to reporters, as actor Mike Farrell, left, looks on, as the men urged rejection of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, in the Capitol, Tuesday, June 4, 2002, in Washington.

(AP Photo/Kenneth Lambert)

Senate Minority Whip Harry Reid, D-Nev., right, and Senate Majority Whip Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speak to the press following a closed meeting of the Nine Eleven Working Group on Capitol Hill, Monday, Oct. 4, 2004, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., talks about his future role as the 109th Congress' Senate minority leader, during an Associated Press interview in his Capitol office, in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2004. Reid succeeds Sen. Tom Daschle, D-SD, who was defeated for re-election on Nov. 2 in South Dakota. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks during a press conference with first responders at the Capitol on Monday, July 11, 2005 in Washington. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., listens to witness testimony during the Senate Democratic Policy Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Sept. 25, 2006 regarding the war in Iraq. Retired military officers on Monday bluntly accused Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld of bungling the war in Iraq, saying U.S. troops were sent to fight without the best equipment and that critical facts were hidden from the public. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., listens to a reporter's question during a news conference after Republican attempts to scuttle the non-binding timeline of Iraq troop withdrawal failed on a vote of 50-48 on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 27, 2007. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 24,2008, before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing: "Crimes Associated with Polygamy: The Need for a Coordinated State and Federal Response." (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
NORTH LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 23: U.S. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks at a campaign rally with U.S. President Barack Obama for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Cheyenne High School on October 23, 2016 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Obama urged Nevadans to vote early one day after a record-breaking start to early voting in the swing state with almost 40,000 people going to the polls ahead of the November 8 general election. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. listens to questions on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2009, after the Senate passed the health care reform bill . (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
NORTH LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 01: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks at a get-out-the-vote rally featuring first lady Michelle Obama at Canyon Springs High School November 1, 2010 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Recent polls show Reid, who is seeking his fifth term, four points behind Republican challenger Sharron Angle. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES â SEPTEMBER 22: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., participates in the Senate Democrats' news conference in the Capitol on Thursday Sept. 22, 2011, to urge House Republicans to fully fund disaster relief. (Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)
Senate majority leader Harry Reid, left, greets supporters as he arrives to speak to members of the Asian American community Sunday, Oct. 24, 2010, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Senate majority leader Harry Reid, center, speaks to members of the Asian community during a campaign stop at a Chinese restaurant Sunday, Oct. 24, 2010, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) appears on 'Meet the Press' Sunday, Jan 9, 2011 at his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.. (Photo by Stephen J. Boitano/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
FILE In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. waits on the floor of the House Capitol Hill in Washington for the arrival of Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani, who was to speak before a joint meeting of Congress. Reid is announcing he will not seek re-election to another term. The 75-year-old Reid says in a statement issued by his office Friday that he wants to make sure Democrats regain control of the Senate next year and that it would be "inappropriate" for him to soak up campaign resources when he could be focusing on putting the Democrats back in power. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
FILE - In this March 17, 2015 file photo, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Reid thanked likely Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul of Kentucky for dispensing "expert advice" on Reid's injured right eye. "I really appreciate it very, very much," the Nevada Democrat said to Paul, a Republican senator and opthamologist who was taking his turn presiding over the chamber Wednesday. "I want the people of Kentucky to know that, how thoughtful, considerate and kind you've been to me over these months," Reid told Paul. On New Year's Day, Reid injured the right side of his face while exercising and has had surgery to restore the sight in his eye. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 03: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) talks to reporters after the weekly Democratic Senate policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol February 3, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid is wearing a bandage over his right eye after undergoing surgery to repair damage from an exercise accident. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-AZ) speaks during a pen and pad session with reporters at the US Capitol January 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid spoke about the injury he suffered over the Christmas break and talked about issues before the US Senate. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., makes his way through the Senate Reception Room after the senate luncheons on his first day in the Capitol since injuring himself in a exercise accident, January 20, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) leaves a meeting with Senate Democrats on Capitol Hill January 20, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid returned to work at the US Capitol on Tuesday for the first time since suffering injuries in an exercise accident in late December at his Las Vegas-area home. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015. Reid, the U.S. Senate's top Democrat, will have surgery next Monday to try to restore full vision to his right eye. Reid suffered three broken ribs, a concussion and broken facial bones near his right eye socket in a New Year's Day accident. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images ** Local Caption *** Harry Reid
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., talks to reporters in his Reno, Nev. office on Monday, Aug. 18, 2014. He said he doesn't intend to waste his time raising money for Democrat Bob Goodman in an unlikely bid to unseat popular Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval in November. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 29, 2014, after a Democratic caucus meeting. Democrats and Republicans in Congress vowed urgent support for a $225 million missile defense package for Israel, boosting the likelihood that legislation will clear Congress before lawmakers begin a monthlong vacation at week's end. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, during a news conference about competing bills from the Democrats and Republicans on employee health coverage and birth control under the Affordable Care Act. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE -This June 24, 2014, file photo shows Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada on his way to speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. After changing Senate rules to speed President Barack Obama's nominees through the Senate, Reid has started demanding 60-vote majorities for virtually everything else, most recently to deny Republican leader Mitch McConnell a chance to block rules limiting carbon emissions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 17, 2014, after a Democratic caucus meeting. President Barack Obama will meet with Congressional leaders at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the turmoil in Iraq. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Ohio state law requires the governor to appoint a senator to finish out the term. With former Republican presidential candidate John Kasich running the Buckeye State, it's a good bet that a Republican senator would serve for Brown's remaining two years. In Massachusetts, the nominee would serve for up to 160 days before state law requires the governor to hold a special election.

Though Warren's work as an aggressive watchdog and consumer advocate has helped her garner a major national profile, many political observers have noted that Brown could also help burnish Clinton's progressive credentials. The senator has strong ties to the progressive wing of the Democratic Party and hails from Ohio, the Rust Belt swing state that's critical to securing the electoral-college votes needed to clinch the White House.

As she comes closer to clinching the Democratic presidential nomination, Clinton is publicly keeping the door open to different options, recently even floating the idea of nominating someone from the business community.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, and Labor Secretary Thomas Perez are all reportedly on the short list of potential running mates.

NOW WATCH: Hillary Clinton says she's open to the idea of having Mark Cuban as her running mate

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Some of the GOP's most vulnerable candidates are doing verbal gymnastics to avoid Donald Trump

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners