Unabomber emerges on Twitter after 20 years to speak to the media

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Unabomber Emerges on Twitter With Chilling Message

Roughly 20 years after Ted Kaczynski, also known as the "Unabomber," was arrested for a planting and sending a series of bombs via U.S. domestic mail, he has once again stepped into the media spotlight, this time on Twitter.

On Sunday, New Yorker staff writer Lawrence Wright posted an image of a letter sent to him from Kaczynski.

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The letter, dated April 4, 2016, states, "I am writing because I am ready to speak to someone from the media regarding my brother's recent comments and to discuss how they are being used to torment me."

Although his brother, David Kaczynski, has commented on Ted's case in the past, it may be the recent release of David's book (Every Last Tie: The Story of the Unabomber and His Family) in February that prompted Ted to attempt to tell what he feels is his side of the story.

Later in the handwritten letter sent to Wright, Ted writes, "In order to determine who will get the interview, I am asking you to write me back affirming that you understand that I am not mentally ill, as my brother, Dave, would have you believe."

Lawrence hasn't followed up with any other Twitter messages to indicate what he plans to do about the letter, but along with the image of the letter he posted what could be seen as both an agreement (sort of) to Ted's terms and a mildly snarky rebuke:

"Thanks, Ted, you're not nuts at all."

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