Meet the ancient fish nicknamed 'Living Dinosaur'

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Meet The Ancient Fish Nicknamed 'Living Dinosaur'

Meet the pallid sturgeon; a large fish native to the continental United States.

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These fish haven't changed much in over 70 million years and for this reason are considered world's "living dinosaurs."

Pallid sturgeon can weigh over 80 pounds and grow to be more than six feet long. Their lifespan has been measured at over 60 years.

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Meet the ancient fish nicknamed 'Living Dinosaur'
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A common clownfish - Amphiprion percular - in an aquarium is photographed during a media preview of 'Coral Reef - Secret Cities of the Sea' exhibition at the Natural History museum in London, Wednesday, March, 25, 2015. The museum'€™s new show plunges into the underwater world, featuring a 'virtual dive' that provides a 180-degree view of five coral reefs controlled by a joystick, including one vista with a manta ray in Komodo Island, Indonesia. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
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According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, "Pallid sturgeon are built for a life in muddy water. Their tiny eyes are not very efficient at finding food, but their whisker-like barbels are covered with chemoreceptors, like taste buds on our tongues, which help them find food."

Formerly abundant throughout the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, they were overfished during the 1900s for the eggs and their populations dwindled.

Pallid sturgeon was listed as an endangered species in the 1990s. Fisheries are now devoted to replenishing the fish and they're expected to make a comeback.

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