Heartwarming: Oklahoma student surprises classmates by walking during graduation

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Oklahoma Student Walks For First Time During Graduation

OKMULGEE, Okla. (KFOR) – As thousands of Oklahoma high school seniors graduate and move on to their next step in life, many are looking back at the hard work it took to reach that milestone.

SEE ALSO: Touching photo of state trooper sharing meal with panhandler goes viral

However, one Oklahoma high school senior worked a little harder than most to pull off a huge surprise in front of his classmates.

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Heartwarming: Oklahoma student surprises classmates by walking during graduation
A Palestinian beekeeper uses smoke to calm bees in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Palestinian beekeeper carries a honeycomb in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Palestinian beekeepers ride a rickshaw motorbike loaded with honeycombs as they make their way to collect honey at a store in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A Palestinian man, who suffers from shoulder pains, receives bee -sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Palestinian girl Alya Al-Ghafari, who suffers from facial palsy, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A Palestinian boy, who suffers from alopecia areata, waits to receive bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Palestinian agricultural engineer Rateb Samour (L), who treats people with bee-sting therapy, speaks with patients at his clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Palestinian beekeepers move beehives in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A Palestinian beekeeper pours freshly collected honey into a container at a store in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Palestinian girl Alya Al-Ghafari, who suffers from facial palsy, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Palestinian patient, who suffers from nerve problems in his neck and back, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
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Micah McDade, who was born with cerebral palsy, has been confined to a wheelchair for as long as students could remember.

According to Okmulgee News Network, McDade has been working for months to be able to leave that wheelchair behind at one important moment.

On Friday, the seniors at Okmulgee High School gathered at Harmon Stadium for their commencement ceremony.

On that night, McDade was just like his fellow students.

Like them, he walked to receive his diploma.

Unbeknownst to his classmates, McDade's perseverance had paid off.

When his name was called, he wheeled himself to the stage and then stood up.

With the help of a walker, McDade made it across the stage to accept his diploma.

His senior classmates immediately gave him a standing ovation.

"Ladies and gentlemen, I've been doing this a long time. That is the best ever!" the announcer said as Micah was helped back into his wheelchair.

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