Texas GOP's error implies most Texans are gay

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Why Grammar Matters: Texas GOP's Error Implies Most Texans Are Gay

Thanks to a grammatical error, Texas GOP's 2016 party platform unintentionally implied that most residents of Texas are probably gay.

According to the Republican platform, "Homosexuality is a chosen behavior that is contrary to the fundamental unchanging truths that has been ordained by God in the Bible, recognized by our nations founders, and shared by the majority of Texans."

Grammatically, the plural noun "truths" needs a plural verb. But, the Texas GOP used the singular verb "has," which makes it sound like the last half of the sentence refers to the singular noun "behavior," as in homosexuality.

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Texas GOP's error implies most Texans are gay
File - In this Oct. 21, 2015 file photo, a man urges people to vote against the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance outside an early voting center in Houston. On Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, voters statewide can give themselves tax breaks, pump billions of dollars into roads and make hunting and fishing constitutional rights by supporting seven amendments to the Texas Constitution on Tuesday's ballot. And Houston will choose a new mayor and decide whether to extend nondiscrimination protections to its gay and transgender residents in a referendum being watched nationally. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)
Rita Palomarez, left, and Linda Rodriguez pray during an election watch party attended by opponents of theHouston Equal Rights Ordinance on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, in Houston. The ordinance that would have established nondiscrimination protections for gay and transgender people in Houston did not pass. (Brett Coomer/HoustonChronicle via AP)
File - In this Oct. 22, 2015 file photo, Houston Mayor Annise Parker, left, greets a supporter at a fund raiser for the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance in Houston. The ordinance that would establish nondiscrimination protections for gay and transgender people in Houston got support this week from some heavy hitters, including the White House and high tech giant Apple. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN - Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin speaks to staff and volunteers in Houston Wednesday Oct. 28, 2015, who are working to get out the vote for Prop 1 - Houston's Equal Rights Ordinance. (Michael Stravato/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign)
Actress Sally Field, left, with Houston area women leaders, speaks at a Human Rights Campaign press conference in Houston, Thursday Oct. 29, 2015 to get out the vote for Prop 1 - Houston's Equal Rights Ordinance. (Michael Stravato/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign)
Campaign for Houston supporters check election results at a watch party, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, in Houston. The group opposes the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance that would establish nondiscrimination protections for gay and transgender people in Houston. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
FILE - In this Friday, June 26, 2015 file photo, couples wait outside the Harris County Personal Records Office to get marriage licenses in Houston just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court announced their decision that same-sex couples have a right to marry in all 50 states. After a drawn-out showdown between Houston's popular lesbian mayor and a coalition of conservative pastors, on Nov. 3, 2015, voters in the nation's fourth-largest city will decide whether to establish nondiscrimination protections for gay and transgender people. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)
Rhea Jared, right, and Georgette Monaghan face the cameras inside the Harris County Personal Records Office after requesting a marriage license Friday, June 26, 2015, in Houston just hours after the Supreme Court announced their decision that same-sex couples have a right to marry in all 50 states. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
FILE - In this Saturday, June 28, 2014 file photo, people dance during a gay pride festival in Houston. After a drawn-out showdown between Houston's popular lesbian mayor and a coalition of conservative pastors, on Nov. 3, 2015, voters in the nation's fourth-largest city will decide whether to establish nondiscrimination protections for gay and transgender people. (Mayra Beltran/Houston Chronicle via AP, File)
Houston Mayor Annise Parker speaks to supporters of the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance at a watch party Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, in Houston. The ordinance that would have established nondiscrimination protections for gay and transgender people in Houston did not pass. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014 file photo, Houston Mayor Annise Parker, left, kisses her partner, Kathy Hubbard, after Parker was sworn in for her third term as mayor during the inauguration ceremony for Parker, City Controller Ronald Green and the 16-member Houston City Council at Wortham Theater Center in Houston. After a drawn-out showdown between Houston's popular lesbian mayor and a coalition of conservative pastors, on Nov. 3, 2015, voters in the nation's fourth-largest city will decide whether to establish nondiscrimination protections for gayand transgender people. (Johnny Hanson/Houston Chronicle via AP) 
Chart shows LGBT anti-discrimination protections by state; 2c x 5 inches; 96.3 mm x 127 mm;
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