Scientists: Over a third of North American bird species in danger

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OTTAWA (Reuters) - More than a third of all North American bird species are at risk of becoming extinct unless significant action is taken, scientists who are part of a tri-nation initiative said on Wednesday, adding that ocean and tropical birds were in particular danger.

The study, compiled by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative and the first of its kind to look at the vulnerability of bird populations in Canada, the United States and Mexico, said 37 percent of all 1,154 species on the continent needed urgent conservation action.

See some of the birds at risk:

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North American birds on Watch List, at risk of extinction
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Scientists: Over a third of North American bird species in danger

Altamira Yellowthroat

(Photo by William Goldsmith via Getty Images)

Black Oystercatcher

(Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

American Woodcock

(Photo credit KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Ancient Murrelet

(Photo by Glenn Bartley via Getty Images)

Ashy storm-petrel

(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Audubons Oriole 

(Photo by Tim Zurowski via Getty Images)

Audubon's Shearwater

(Photo via Getty Images)

Baird's sparrow

(Photo by Keith Levit Photography via Getty Images)

Band-tailed Pigeon

(Photo via Getty Images)

Bendire's thrasher

(Photo by Jim Zipp via Getty Images)

Bicknell's Thrush

(Photo by Garth McElroy via Getty Images)

Black hawk-eagle

(Photo by Eduardo Rivero via Getty Images)

Black-and-white hawk-eagle

(Photo via Getty Images)

Black-banded woodcreeper

(Photo by Glenn Bartley via Getty Images)

Black-billed cuckoo

(Photo by Paul Reeves Photography via Getty Images)

Black-capped petrel

(Photo via Getty Images)

Black-capped siskin

(Photo via Getty Images)

Black-capped vireo

(Photo by Anthony Mercieca via Getty Images)

Black-cheeked woodpecker

(Photo By DEA / C. DANI I. JESKE/De Agostini/Getty Images)

Black-chinned sparrow 

(Photo by Jim Zipp via Getty Images)

Black-cowled oriole

(Photo via Getty Images)

Black-crested coquette 

(Photo by Glenn Bartley via Getty Images)

Black footed albatross

(Photo by Paul & Paveena Mckenzie via Getty Images)

Blue footed booby

(Photo by Rebecca Yale via Getty Images)

Bobolink

(Photo by Linda Freshwaters Arndt via Getty Images)

Brandt's cormorant

(Photo by Werner Bollmann via Getty Images)

Bristle-thighed curlew

(Photo by Paul & Paveena Mckenzie via Getty Images)

Brown-capped vireo 

(Photo by Glenn Bartley via Getty Images)

Brown-hooded parrot

(Photo via Getty Images)

Buff-breasted sandpiper

(Photo via Getty Images)

Buller's shearwater

(Photo via Getty Images)

California condor

(Photo by Alexandra Rudge via Getty Images)

California Thrasher

(Photo by Rob Pavey via Getty Images)

Canada warbler 

(Johann Schumacher via Getty Images)

Cape May warbler

(Photo by Garth McElroy via Getty Images)

Cassin's finch

(Photo via Getty Images)

Cerulean warbler

(Photo by Steve Maslowski via Getty Images)

Chestnut-capped brush-finch

(Photo by Glenn Bartley via Getty Images)

Chestnut-collared longspur

(Photo by Jared Hobbs via Getty Images)

Male chestnut woodpecker

(Photo by Andrew M. Snyder via Getty Images)

Common eider

(Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Crested guan

(Photo by Krysia Campos via Getty Images)

Crimson-collared tanager

(Photo via Getty Images)

Eastern whip-poor-will

(Photo by Glenn Bartley via Getty Images)

Emperor goose

(Photo via Getty Images)

Evening grosbeak

(Photo via Getty Images)

Fan-tailed warbler

(Photo via Getty Images)

Flame-colored tanager

(Photo via Getty Images)

Flesh footed shearwater

(Photo via Getty Images)

Gilded flicker

(Photo via Getty Images)

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The governments of Canada, the United States and Mexico created the North American Bird Conservation Initiative in 1999.

More than half the species for oceans and tropical forests are on a special watch list because of small and declining populations, limited ranges and severe threats to their habitats.

"The outlook for oceanic birds ... is the bleakest of any North American bird group," said the report, which blamed invasive predators such as rats and cats on nesting islands as well as overfishing, pollution and climate change.

Ways to address the problem include removing predators, expanding protected marine areas and reducing the amount of plastic products that end up in the ocean and can trap or choke birds, the report said.

Many species in coastal, grassland and arid habitats are declining steeply, in particular long-distance migratory shore birds. The main causes are sea level rise, coastal development, human activity and oil spills, the report said.

The report can be found at: http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/

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