Poll: Most Native Americans are OK with the Washington Redskins' name

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Poll: Most Native Americans Are OK With the Washington Redskins' Name

Do the Washington Redskins have an offensive team name? Well, it depends on whom you ask.

According to a new Washington Post poll, nine out of 10 Native Americans said they aren't offended by it.

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The poll surveyed 504 Native American adults across every state. It has a 5.5 percent margin of error.

The results are good for "Washington's football team" and owner Dan Snyder, who's been adamant about his position on any potential name change.

Snyder released a statement in response to the poll, saying, "The Washington Redskins team, our fans and community have always believed our name represents honor, respect and pride. Today's Washington Post polling shows Native Americans agree."

Still, there seems to be a lot of people out there who are against the name.

A PSA ad against the name says: "Native Americans call themselves a lot of things. The one thing they don't ..."

The team name took a big hit two years ago when the United States Patent and Trademark Office canceled the team's trademark on the name, calling it "disparaging to Native Americans."

That meant just about anyone could use the name and logo however they wanted.

RELATED: Washington Redskins name controversy

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Poll: Most Native Americans are OK with the Washington Redskins' name
FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2009 file photo, the Washington Redskins logo is seen on the field before the start of a preseason NFL football game in Landover, Md. The Justice Department says it is intervening in a trademark dispute concerning the team name of the Washington Redskins. A June ruling from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office stripped the professional football team of trademark protection, (AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)
A group protests the Washington Redskins name across from Levi's Stadium before an NFL football game between the Redskins and the San Francisco 49ers in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)
A group protests the Washington Redskins name across from Levi's Stadium before an NFL football game between the Redskins and the San Francisco 49ers in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)
A group protests the Washington Redskins name across from Levi's Stadium before an NFL football game between the Redskins and the San Francisco 49ers in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)
Protestors march outside TCF Bank Stadium before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Washington Redskins, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014, in Minneapolis. The group was protesting the use of the mascot and name of the Washington Redskins football team. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Protestors march outside TCF Bank Stadium before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Washington Redskins, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014, in Minneapolis. The group was protesting the use of the mascot and name of the Washington Redskins football team. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Protestors march outside TCF Bank Stadium before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Washington Redskins, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014, in Minneapolis. The group was protesting the use of the mascot and name of the Washington Redskins football team. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Protestors march outside TCF Bank Stadium before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Washington Redskins, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014, in Minneapolis. The group was protesting the use of the mascot and name of the Washington Redskins football team. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Protestors march outside TCF Bank Stadium before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Washington Redskins, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014, in Minneapolis. The group was protesting the use of the mascot and name of the Washington Redskins football team. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
LANDOVER MD, NOVEMBER 16: Ian Washburn, a thrid-generation Redskins fan and season ticket holder wears his altered football wear. He repalced the Redskins name with the word Washington or the 'DC' for the logo. Shown before the Washington Redskins lost to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at FedEx Field in Landover MD, November 16, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 28: Tara Houska, right, joins other Native Americans and supporters to protest the name and logo of the Washington Football team before the game on Sunday, December 28, 2014. Houska is co-founder of the organization notyourmascots.org (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 28: Washington Redskins fans walk past as Native Americans and supporters protest the name and logo of the Washington Football team before the game on Sunday, December 28, 2014. The protesters could not get on to the grounds at FedEx Field so Jericho City of Praise is offered them space. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 28: 'We are people, not your mascot,' shouts Adrianne Plenty Holes as she points to her baby Yamni Plenty Holes, 11 months, while participating in a protest of the name and logo of the Washington Football team before the game on Sunday, December 28, 2014. The protesters could not get on to the grounds at FedEx Field so Jericho City of Praise is offered them space. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 2: People march to TCF Bank Stadium to protest against the mascot for the Washington Redskins before the game against the Minnesota Vikings on November 2, 2014 at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opponents of the Redskins name believe it's a slur that mocks Native American culture and they want the team to change it. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS MN, NOVEMBER 2: Native Americans and other citizens taking part in the protest against the Redskins team name, walk outside the stadium that the Washington Redskins will play the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis MN, November 2, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS MN, NOVEMBER 2: Native Americans taking part in the protest against the Redskins team name, march outside the stadium that the Washington Redskins will play the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis MN, November 2, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS MN, NOVEMBER 2: Native Americans taking part in the protest against the Redskins team name, carry tribal banners outside the stadium that the Washington Redskins will play the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis MN, November 2, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 2: People march to TCF Bank Stadium to protest against the mascot for the Washington Redskins before the game against the Minnesota Vikings on November 2, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opponents of the Redskins name believe it's a slur that mocks Native American culture and they want the team to change it. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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"You have no right to use our name to get attention," an animated Dan Snyder said on "South Park."

"Uh, the trademark got pulled, so I'm totally free to use the name actually," Cartman said.

"Look, don't you see when you call your organization the Washington Redskins, it's offensive to us?"

Interestingly, The Washington Post's editorial board voted to stop using the team's name in late 2014. That board is different from the news-gathering operation, which still uses it.

The Post says this recent poll yielded virtually the same results as another one in 2004 from a different organization. The NFL has declined to comment on the new poll.

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