US Senate passes bill allowing Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia

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Ex-US Senator: Gov't Withholding Truth on 9/11


WASHINGTON, May 17 (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate passed legislation on Tuesday that would allow survivors and relatives of those killed in the Sept. 11 attacks to file lawsuits seeking damages against the government of Saudi Arabia.

The legislation, known as the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, or JASTA, passed in the Senate by unanimous voice vote.

SEE ALSO: Former 9/11 commissioner brings shocking new details about redacted documents to light

If it passes the House of Representatives and is signed into law by U.S. President Barack Obama, JASTA would allow lawsuits to proceed in federal court in New York as lawyers try to prove that the Saudis were involved in the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

The Saudis deny any involvement. (Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Bill Rigby)

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US Senate passes bill allowing Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia
A display of clothes that was recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Center is stored in a hanger of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The pieces are some of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A steel beam that had pieces cut out by construction workers is stored in an almost empty hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The beam is one of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A steel beam that had pieces cut out by construction workers is stored in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The beam is one of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A section of the antenna that once stood on the top of the destroyed World Trade Center is loaded on a truck at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. It is being transported to FultonâMontgomery Community College in Johnstown, N.Y., where is will be displayed. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A damaged carriage of a PATH train that once carried commuters from New Jersey to the World Trade Center is loaded on to a truck in a cargo area of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. This car is headed to the Trolley Museum of New York in Kingston, where it will be the centerpiece of a future Sept. 11 wing. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A damaged carriage of a PATH train that once carried commuters from New Jersey to the World Trade Center is loaded on to a truck in a cargo area of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. This car is headed to the Trolley Museum of New York in Kingston, where it will be the centerpiece of a future Sept. 11 wing. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A damaged carriage of a PATH train that once carried commuters from New Jersey to the World Trade Center is loaded on to a truck in a cargo area of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. This car is headed to the Trolley Museum of New York in Kingston, where it will be the centerpiece of a future Sept. 11 wing. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A section of the antenna that once stood on the top of the destroyed World Trade Center is stored with a few other remaining pieces from the Sept. 11 attacks in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A section of the antenna that once stood on the top of the destroyed World Trade Center is stored with a few other remaining pieces from the Sept. 11 attacks in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A section of the antenna that once stood on the top of the destroyed World Trade Center, left, is stored with a few other remaining pieces from the Sept. 11 attacks in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A few remaining pieces of the destroyed World Trade Center are stored in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The pieces are some of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A section of the antenna that once stood on the top of the destroyed One World Trade Center is loaded on a truck at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. It is being transported to FultonâMontgomery Community College in Johnstown, NY, where is will be displayed. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Items recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Center are stored in hanger of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The pieces are some of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Clothing displays that were recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Center are stored in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The pieces are some of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A steel beam that had pieces cut out by construction workers is stored in a hanger at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The beam is one of the last remnants of a host of artifacts recovered after the Sept. 11 attacks that have been held in storage at the airport for 14 years by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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