Is Egypt 'suppressing truth' about new King Tut research?

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Is Egypt 'Suppressing Truth' About New King Tut Research?


Is Egypt withholding information that could potentially disprove the existence of hidden chambers in King Tutankhamun's tomb?

One unnamed scientist in a recent Guardian profile says that this is, indeed, the case, saying, "My understanding is that the Egyptians are in a state of denial about this."

The debate began last year when Nicholas Reeves, a British Egyptologist, and Hirokatsu Watanabe, a radar expert, separately concluded that there were likely spaces behind the tomb's walls, notes the National Geographic.

However, some in the community were openly skeptical about these claims and the evidence they were based on, so another round of high-tech scans was led by the National Geographic Society earlier this year.

Despite having received a report about the findings, Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities has not yet released the results, and press inquiries have reportedly gone largely unanswered.

According to Live Science, the general belief is that the new scans show no indications of hidden rooms, but the ministry "has refused to accept the new results."

Political instability and declining tourism could be contributing to this stance.

Additional tests are expected to be conducted by Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities, reports Live Science.

RELATED: See photos of the restoration of King Tut's mask:

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NTP: Restoring King Tutankhamun's Mask
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Is Egypt 'suppressing truth' about new King Tut research?
CAIRO, EGYPT - OCTOBER 20: German expert Christihan Eijkman restarted the restoration of one of the priceless pieces of the time of the Pharoahs, King Tutankhamun's mummy's golden mask, due to the failure of the first restoration attempt at the Egyptian Museum in the capital Cairo on October 20, 2015. (Photo by Mahmoud Bakkar /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - OCTOBER 20: German expert Christihan Eijkman (R) restarted the restoration of one of the priceless pieces of the time of the Pharoahs, King Tutankhamun's mummy's golden mask, due to the failure of the first restoration attempt at the Egyptian Museum in the capital Cairo on October 20, 2015. (Photo by Mahmoud Bakkar /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - OCTOBER 20: German expert Christihan Eijkman restarted the restoration of one of the priceless pieces of the time of the Pharoahs, King Tutankhamun's mummy's golden mask, due to the failure of the first restoration attempt at the Egyptian Museum in the capital Cairo on October 20, 2015. (Photo by Mahmoud Bakkar /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - OCTOBER 20: German expert Christihan Eijkman (R 2) restarted the restoration of one of the priceless pieces of the time of the Pharoahs, King Tutankhamun's mummy's golden mask, due to the failure of the first restoration attempt at the Egyptian Museum in the capital Cairo on October 20, 2015. (Photo by Mahmoud Bakkar /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
The golden mask of Tutankhamun is seen during restoration process by German specialists in restoration work on antiquities in glass and metal at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo on October 20, 2015. Egypt started work to remove a crust of dried glue on the beard of legendary boy pharaoh Tutankhamun's golden mask after a botched repair job on the priceless relic. The beard fell off in an August 2014 accident at the Cairo Museum, leading to the botched repair by employees. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - OCTOBER 20: German expert Christihan Eijkman restarted the restoration of one of the priceless pieces of the time of the Pharoahs, King Tutankhamun's mummy's golden mask, due to the failure of the first restoration attempt at the Egyptian Museum in the capital Cairo on October 20, 2015. (Photo by Mahmoud Bakkar /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
German specialists in restoration work on antiquities in glass and metal, Christian Eckmann (R) and Katja Broschat (L), work on the restoration process of the golden mask of Tutankhamun at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo on October 20, 2015. Egypt started work to remove a crust of dried glue on the beard of legendary boy pharaoh Tutankhamun's golden mask after a botched repair job on the priceless relic. The beard fell off in an August 2014 accident at the Cairo Museum, leading to the botched repair by employees. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)
German specialists in restoration work on antiquities in glass and metal Christian Eckmann works on the restoration process of the golden mask of Tutankhamun at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo on October 20, 2015. Egypt started work to remove a crust of dried glue on the beard of legendary boy pharaoh Tutankhamun's golden mask after a botched repair job on the priceless relic. The beard fell off in an August 2014 accident at the Cairo Museum, leading to the botched repair by employees. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)
German specialists in restoration work on antiquities in glass and metal Christian Eckmann works on the restoration process of the golden mask of Tutankhamun at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo on October 20, 2015. Egypt started work to remove a crust of dried glue on the beard of legendary boy pharaoh Tutankhamun's golden mask after a botched repair job on the priceless relic. The beard fell off in an August 2014 accident at the Cairo Museum, leading to the botched repair by employees. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)
German restorers Christian Eckmann and Katja Broschat begin work on the restoration of the famed golden mask of King Tutankhamun at the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
German restorers Christian Eckmann, right, and Katja Broschat examine the famed golden mask of King Tutankhamun as an Egyptian-German team begins restoration work over a year after the beard was accidentally broken off and hastily glued back with epoxy, at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. The 3,300-year-old burial pharaonic mask was discovered in Tutankhamun's tomb along with other artifacts by British archeologists in 1922, sparking worldwide interest in archaeology and ancient Egypt. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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