Bros4Hillary: Why so many gay men are so hot for Hillary Clinton

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What The Gay Couple In Hillary Clinton's Video Announcement Thinks Of Her

Stop in on any given night at Revolver, a popular West Hollywood gay bar, and you'll be bombarded by visions of perfectly chiseled men and underwear-clad dancers.

But instead of ogling go-go boys, the 200 or so men who arrived on this particular evening in late April were there to pay homage to their queen.

Queen Hillary, that is.

"Gay men love powerful women," said Alex Mohajer. "And not just because it's campy. We identify with her."

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A lawyer by day, Mohajer is the political director of Bros4Hillary, a grassroots organization boasting mostly gay men from Los Angeles (though its founders insist it's open to anyone) that was throwing its first major event at the bawdy bar. The group started as little more than a Facebook page, but for reasons even its organizers can't quite explain, it took off.

READ MORE: Bernie Sanders Facebook Pages Shut Down After Porn Cyber Attack

These days, "Bros4Hillary" has close to 8,000 members, including some of Clinton's own campaign staffers. The group has also raised some cash for its candidate — about $9,000 so far.

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Hillary Clinton supporters on the campaign trail
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Bros4Hillary: Why so many gay men are so hot for Hillary Clinton
Supporters John Nelson, 32, (L) and Dan Stifler, 32, cheer U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she arrives to speak on stage at the UFCW Union Local 324 in Buena Park, California, U.S. May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Supporters cheer on U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she speaks during a campaign stop in Sacramento, California, United States June 5, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Supporter Monica Brown pins a Hillary Clinton button to her 2008 Hillary campaign t-shirt as she prepares for the arrival of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clintons visit to at a small restaurant in Vallejo, California, United States June 5, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake ATTENTION EDITORS - EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES
Supporters await the arrival of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a campaign stop in Fresno, California, United States June 4, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A Hillary supporter yells out with a picture of Donald Trump on her phone as U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Fresno, California, United States June 4, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Supporters cheers as U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop at a high school in Oxnard, California, United States June 4, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Supporters hold a sign as U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a campaign stop in San Bernardino, California, United States June 3, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a selfie with supporters during a campaign stop in San Bernardino, California, United States June 3, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Supporters cheer on U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she speaks at a campaign stop in San Bernardino, California, United States June 3, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A young supporter cheers as she awaits the arrival of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a "Women for Hillary" event in Culver City, California, United States, June 3, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A supporter wears a sunglasses adorned with logos of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a campaign event in San Francisco, California, U.S. May 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
A supporter listens as Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event in San Francisco, California, U.S. May 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Supporters listen to Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak at a campaign event in San Jose, California, U.S. May 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Women cheer for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at the UFCW Union Local 324 in Buena Park, California, U.S. May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A supporter cheers as U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the UFCW Union Local 324 in Buena Park, California, U.S. May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Supporters listen to U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak at the UFCW Union Local 324 in Buena Park, California, U.S. May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A supporter cheers for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she speaks at the University of California Riverside in Riverside, California, U.S. May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES.
Marlena Steinbach, 9, (L) and her sister Ella Steinbach, 15, cheer the motorcade of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton outside the IBEW union hall where Clinton was due to speak in Commerce, California, U.S., May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Artist Gretchen Baer of BisBee, Arizona, stands next to the "Hillcar", a car she painted and decorated in support of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, as she stands on a street in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S. April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE
Six-year-old Kayla Johnson (C) her mother Andrea (L) and friend London Walters (R) react as U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton enters the Garrick-Boykin Human Development Center at Morris College in Sumter, South Carolina, February 24, 2016. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Supporters cheer as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Hartnell College, Wednesday, May 25, 2016, in Salinas, Calif. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrive to attend a primary night event during Pennsylvania's primary election on April 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Voters cast ballots in five northeastern states, with frontrunners Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both looking to overwhelm their respective Democratic and Republican rivals in the race for the White House / AFP / EDUARDO MUNOZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters cheer as they listen to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak during a rally at Louisville Slugger Field's Hall of Fame Pavilion in Louisville, Ky., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
TOPSHOT - A car with the face of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders drives past a supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on Broad Street during Pennsylvania's primary election on April 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Voters cast ballots in five northeastern states, with frontrunners Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both looking to overwhelm their respective Democratic and Republican rivals in the race for the White House. / AFP / EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this April 19, 2016, photo, supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton celebrate at her New York primary campaign headquarters. With six months to go, the U.S. election campaign has boiled down to an unprecedented contest that could transform America's role in the world. Democrat Hillary Clinton, a fixture on the political stage for a quarter century, is set to face Donald Trump, a brash billionaire real estate mogul who has never held elected office. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
Supporters listen to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak during a rally at Louisville Slugger Field's Hall of Fame Pavilion in Louisville, Ky., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Supporters listen to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton campaign at East Los Angeles College in Los Angeles, Thursday, May 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a selfie with a supporter after a speaking at a rally at Louisville Slugger Field's Hall of Fame Pavilion in Louisville, Ky., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Supporters of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attend a "Women for Hillary" campaign rally in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S. April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
A supporter fans herself as Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at Southwest College in Los Angeles, California, United States, April 16, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A supporter holds up an action figure of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton before Clinton spoke at Southwest College in Los Angeles, California, United States, April 16, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A supporter for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton boos at the mention of Donald Trump as Clinton speaks at Carnegie Mellon University on a campaign stop, Wednesday, April 6, 2016, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
A supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton holds a sign during a campaign event featuring Clinton at the Riverside Ballroom in Green Bay, Wis., Tuesday, March 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
OAKLAND, CA - MAY 06: Supporters look on as democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally on May 6, 2016 in Oakland, California. Hillary Clinton is campaigning in California ahead of the State's presidential primary on June 7th. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Planned Parenthood and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton supporters looks to the stage during the National Anthem during a Clinton campaign event at Rainier Beach High School in Seattle, Tuesday, March 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes photos with supporters in the audience after speaking during a campaign event at Carl Hayden Community High School in Phoenix, Monday, March 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 2: A members of the Laborers International Union of North America (LiUNA) and Hillary Clinton supporters outside Hillary Clinton rally at the Jacob Davits Center in New York, New York on March 2, 2016. Photo Credit: Rainmaker Photo/MediaPunch/IPX
Supporters cheer for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton while she speaks at a campaign event at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters after a town hall meeting at Cumberland United Methodist Church in Florence, South Carolina February 25, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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"I was really surprised at the response," founder Nelson Melegrito told TheWrap. "It just exploded."

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In an effort to gain attention on social media, "Bros4Hillary" produced a series of sexy memes, including one featuring a hunky firefighter that reads: "We'll Put Out Your Bern," a jab at Sen. Bernie Sanders' ubiquitous catchphrase.

It seems gay men are flocking to Clinton this election cycle. A February survey conducted by the gay dating app SCRUFF found that more than 63 percent of respondents supported Clinton for president, while less than half -- 31 percent -- backed Sanders.

Clinton also scored the endorsement of major gay organizations, including Human Rights Campaign, the largest LGBT advocacy group in the country, and Equality PAC, a political action committee formed by leaders of the Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus.

READ MORE: Hollywood Stars for Hillary Clinton (List)

Despite being painted as part of the establishment by the Sanders campaign, when it comes to many in the gay community, Clinton is seen as the underdog candidate.

"She's so qualified, we forget that she's a woman vying for the biggest, hardest job in the country," Mohajer said. "Having been vilified as a community, you're on the outside looking in. And so is Hillary."

According to psychotherapist Adam D. Blum, who serves as the director and founder of the Gay Therapy Center in Los Angeles and San Francisco, there's a reason gay men are drawn to Clinton.

"The story of women who've had to overcome adversity is appealing to them," Blum told TheWrap. "Gay men have been the outsiders in a world of straight male power."

Some of those who grew up in the days before "Queer as Folk" and "Will & Grace" seem to relate to Clinton on an even deeper level than, say, Millennials. As one 40-year-old "Bros4Hillary" member, who preferred his name not be used, told TheWrap, "She was bullied a lot by Republicans. I can relate to that."

READ MORE: 16 Potential Hillary Clinton Running Mates, From Elizabeth Warren to Cory Booker (Photos)

The gay community is one of the most sought-after voting blocs, particularly when it comes to donations. The combined buying power of the U.S. LGBT adult population for 2014 was estimated at a whopping $884 billion, according to an analysis by Witeck Communications, a D.C.-based pubic relations and marketing firm.

Gay Hollywood has already rolled out the rainbow carpet for Clinton. Ellen DeGeneres, "I Am Cait" star Candis Cayne, Jim Parsons, Michael Kors, Rosie O'Donnell, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Chris Colfer, Greg Berlanti, Lee Daniels, Andrew Rannells, Elton John and Ricky Martin have all endorsed her.

Sanders, on the other hand, has only a handful of LGBT celebrity backers, including Heather Matarazzo, Ezra Miller and singer Meshell Ndegeocello.

Over the years, Clinton has become something of an icon in the gay community. Despite a mixed history on LGBT issues, she's managed to establish herself as a champion of LGBT rights.

Critics are quick to point out that she did not endorse gay marriage until 2013, after polls showed most Americans were on board with the idea. (Clinton owned up to that in a "Saturday Night Live" skit last October.) In March, Clinton ruffled feathers when she praised former First Lady Nancy Reagan's "effective, low-key advocacy" of HIV/AIDS, praise she was forced to walk back after AIDS advocates corrected her: The Reagans were widely criticized for largely ignoring the AIDS epidemic.

But Clinton's supporters note she's been a strong advocate for HIV research and has appeared at countless gay events over the years. Her signature 2011 gay rights speech in front of the United Nations as secretary of state — declaring that "gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights" — remains to this day one of the most significant moments in LGBT history. And in April 2015, Clinton made history again when her official campaign launch video featured two men holding hands, a first for any presidential candidate.

"She's thoughtful and she cares," said Mohajer. "She's undoubtedly an ally."

Read original story Bros4Hillary: Why So Many Gay Men Are So Hot For Hillary Clinton At TheWrap

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