Kim Jong Un: We won't nuke you unless threatened

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Kim Jong Un: North Korea will only use nuclear weapons if sovereignty threatened

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said at his party's congress on Saturday that the country will not use nuclear weapons unless its sovereignty is under threat, state media reported on Sunday.

"As a responsible nuclear weapons state, our Republic will not use a nuclear weapon unless its sovereignty is encroached upon by any aggressive hostile forces with nukes," the leader said, according to North Korea's state news agency. Kim said the country "will sincerely fulfill its duties for the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and work to realize the denuclearization of the world," the Associated Press reported.

Speaking in Pyongyang at the ruling Workers' Party of Korea's first congress since 1980, Kim also said the country is willing to improve and normalize relations with nations that "respect the sovereignty of the DPRK and are friendly towards it" even if they were hostile toward it previously, state media reported. He even said he seeks further talks with South Korea to ease tensions between the two states.

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Kim Jong Un: We won't nuke you unless threatened
North Koreans watch an electronic screen announcing the launch of a satellite on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, at the Pyongyang Railway Station in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (AP Photo/Kim Kwang Hyon)
North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans watch a fireworks display from the Kim Il Sung Square as they gather to celebrate a satellite launch, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans dance on the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans dance on the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
South Korean residents in Japan protest with a banner that reads: "we sternly denouce the missile launch" in front of headquarters of the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan, in Tokyo Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Visitors watching the North side are seen through barbed-wire entanglements as they visit Imjingak near the border village of the Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Koreans watch a TV news program with a file footage about North Korea's rocket launch at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. The letters on the screen read: "The U.N. Security Council will hold a meeting on Feb. 7." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean Army soldiers patrol along the barbed-wire fence in Paju, near the border with North Korea, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
A Japanese police officer stands in front of the headquarters of the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan, in Tokyo, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
South Korean army soldiers close a gate in Paju, near the border with North Korea, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
In this Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016 photo, a passer-by receives an extra newspaper reporting North Korea's rocket launch, in Tokyo. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
South Korean army soldiers watch a TV news program with a file footage about North Korea's rocket launch at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Visitors watch the North Korean side at the unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. For North Korea's propaganda machine, the long-range rocket launch Sunday carved a glorious trail of "fascinating vapor" through the clear blue sky. For South Korea's president, and other world leaders, it was a banned test of dangerous ballistic missile technology and yet another "intolerable provocation." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Samantha Power, left, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, listens as Motohide Yoshikawa, Japan's ambassador, makes comments to the media following a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. The council is meeting about North Korea's successful launch of a long-range missile. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
A postman enters the headquarters of the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan as a police officer stands guard its gate in Tokyo, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
People watch a TV news reporting a rocket launch in North Korea, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. For North Korea's propaganda machine, the long-range rocket launch Sunday carved a glorious trail of "fascinating vapor" through the clear blue sky. For South Korea's president, and other world leaders, it was a banned test of dangerous ballistic missile technology and yet another "intolerable provocation." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
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But Kim's desire to repair his country's relationship with the south appears a long way off. South Korea's Foreign Ministry said before the weekend congress that its priority in any further talks with the north is North Korea's denuclearization, the AP reported. On Saturday, Kim said North Korea will continue to develop its nuclear weapons alongside its economy—a strategy that he said should be followed for the "maximized interest of our revolution," the AP reported, citing a speech published by the Rodong Sinmun newspaper.

The declarations came four months after North Korea claimed to have tested a hydrogen bomb, which is far more powerful than an atomic one. The nation has also continued to launch missiles in the face of international condemnations of its nuclear and missile activity, and new U.N. sanctions that include a ban on selling jet fuel and rocket fuel to North Korea.

Despite the sanctions and others that have continually been levied against the country, Kim also announced a five-year plan aimed at reviving North Korea's struggling economy. His plans include the development of nuclear power plants, and growing light manufacturing production and agriculture. While North Korea does not publish data on economic growth, Reuters reported that the South's central bank said North Korea's economy grew by 1 percent in 2014.

The post Kim Jong Un: We Won't Nuke You Unless Threatened appeared first on Vocativ.

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