Tricks restaurants use to save money

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Tricks Restaurants Use To Save Money

(Eye Opener) - As you might have heard, Starbucks has just been slapped with a $5 million lawsuit by a woman named Stacy Pincus for fraud, negligent misrepresentation, and unjust enrichment all for the heinous act of including only 14 ounces of a cold drink in her 24 ounce sized venti order, in which the ice took up the other 10 ounces.

Yes, because she had too much ice in her iced drink, she's suing Starbucks for $5 million.

Since Subway was successfully sued because their footlong subs weren't exactly 12-inches long, Starbucks should take this lawsuit seriously.

Of course, Starbucks and Subway aren't the only restaurants out there with some cost-cutting practices that might get them into some hot water. Eater put together a list of ways restaurants cut back and here's what they found:

Size switch-ups

When food prices go up, restaurants have interesting ways of making it seem like you're still getting a good deal, for example, making their plates smaller with smaller portions. This way it seems as though you're still getting the same amount. Or, giving you heavier forks and knives with your steak, making you think that slab of beef is better than what it is.

Name changes

You probably wouldn't order some Patagonian Toothfish, right? To make it sound more appealing, restaurants prefer to call it Chilean Sea Bass.

Draft beer

You might notice your draft beer has up to an inch of foam on top. This saves them 20 beers each keg.

Squeaky clean shrimp

Americans love shrimp. So, to keep them clean and "fresh" as they're being transported, they're treated with a form of formaldehyde. Yeah, like the stuff they use in funeral homes to keep bodies from rotting.

Business often cut corners to save a buck, but if enough of them are called out on it (ahem, Starbucks), maybe they'll all start being a little more honest and upfront.

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