Rio's slum hostels offer alternative Olympic housing

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Hostels in Rio slums to serve as housing for Olympics
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Rio's slum hostels offer alternative Olympic housing
Solange, a worker at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel, stands near an entrance, in Pereira da Silva favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 21, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Milene prepares a room at Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 1, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A tourist leaves her room at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A room at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel is seen in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A man is reflected in a mirror in a room at Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 15, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A room at Tiki hostel is seen in Cantagalo favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 1, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A guest relaxes with the The Sugar Loaf mountain in the background at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A woman sits on a terrace at Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 16, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A man walks along a terrace at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 21, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A room at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel is seen in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Solange, a worker at Pousada Favelinha hostel, talks to guests outside the hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Solange, a worker at Pousada Favelinha hostel, returns to the hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Solange, a worker at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel, poses for a photograph at the hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Houses are seen through a window of Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 1, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Solange, a worker at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel, prepares a room in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 21, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A drawing is seen on a wall at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Cats sit on a chair at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
British musician Tom Ashe poses for a photograph near the building where he is renting a room, in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 2, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Ligia, the owner of Pousada Favela Cantagalo hostel, poses for a photograph near her hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 1, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A room at Pousada Favela Cantagalo hostel is seen in Cantagalo favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 1, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A room for rent is seen at a house in Pereira da Silva favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 2, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A suite is seen at the Mirante do Arvrao hostel in Vidigal favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 5, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Dois Irmaos (Two brothers) peaks are seen from the Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 1, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A guest walks along a terrace at Alto Vidigal hostel in Vidigal favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 23, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A worker serves coffee to a guest at Pousada Favelinha (Little favela) hostel kitchen in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 29, 2016. Hostels in a few of RioÃs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
The combination picture shows views through hostel windows located in various favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil April 15-24, 2016. Hostels in a few of Rioâs more than 1,000 slums serve not only as a cheap housing alternative for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August. The establishments also open up the rich culture of the city's shantytowns for travellers, giving them a glimpse into once "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "HOLIDAY FAVELAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Sugar Loaf mountain is seen through a window of Favelinha (Little favela) hostel in Pereira da Silva favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 21, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Houses are seen through a window of Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Ipanema beach is seen through a window at the Alto Vidigal hostel in Vidigal favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 23, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
The Dois Irmaos (Two brothers) peaks are seen through a window of Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Houses are seen through a window of Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Christ the Redeemer statue is seen through a window of Scene hostel in Santa Marta favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 24, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Houses are seen through a window of Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Houses are seen through a window of Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 16, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Houses (R) are seen through a window as Copacabana beach is reflected on a glass at Tiki hostel in Cantagalo favela, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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RIO DE JANEIRO, May 3 (Reuters) - Stunning views of iconic Sugarloaf Mountain, a sun-drenched patio nestled in the hills of Atlantic rainforest and rooms costing a fraction of nearby hotels.

The Favelinha hostel, like others in several of Rio's more than 1,000 shantytowns, offers more than just cheap housing for the more adventurous among the estimated 500,000 foreign tourists expected to arrive for the Olympics in August.

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The establishments also open the rich culture of the city's slums for travelers, giving them a glimpse into one-time "no-go" areas where about one-fifth of Rio's population lives.

French tourist Sabrina Noblanc took selfies with a friend on the deck of the Favelinha hostel in the Pereira da Silva slum, or "favela," located in central Rio on a steep hill, where the city's traffic din fades away to the squawks of jungle birds and squeals of kite-flying kids.

Noblanc arrived in Rio with the notion that all the city's shantytowns were centers of heavily armed gangs and drug trade violence.

"Now that I'm here, I am impressed," she said. "It's better than my imagination. For me, it was to be so dangerous, with the guns and everything. Actually, that's not the case."

Without question, the majority of Rio's slums suffer from intense violence. What critics call heavy-handed policing, coupled with drug factions fighting among themselves for territory, leads to daily shootings and deaths.

Brazil, according to United Nations' statistics, has more gun deaths than any other country.

Rio's state government implemented a program in 2008 to "pacify" slums by pushing the gangs out of areas mostly located near richer neighborhoods or Olympic venues.

But the effort has had mixed results and is losing steam because the security budget was slashed this year amid Brazil's economic crisis.

Take a look at life around Rio's Guanabara Bay:

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Life in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Olympics
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Rio's slum hostels offer alternative Olympic housing
A child jumps into the waters of Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro's downtown Brazil, January 5, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A fisherman is pictured behind an image of Saint George during fishing session on the waters of Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 8, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Naval carpenter Alexandro de Oliveira, 41, is pictured inside his boat house on the waters of Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 5, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A fisherman carries a bag of fish as he walks in a channel which flows into Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 7, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A dog walks on Paqueta island in Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 12, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A ferry (L) arrives at Paqueta island in Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 13, 2016. According to the concessionaire 110,000 passengers travel on the ferries, which connect neighborhoods and cities surrounded by the Guanabara Bay to Rio de Janeiro's downtown, per day. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Helio dos Santos (R), 72, sits by the door of his house with his wife Zilda Santos, 71, on Paqueta island in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 13, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Naval carpenter Alexandro de Oliveira, 41, stands atop his boat house in the waters of the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 5, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A boat sails in Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 25, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A youth stands on the Ponte da Saudade "Longing Bridge" at Paqueta island in Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 13, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Houses stand on Paqueta island in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 13, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A fisherman holds a fish caught in his net in the waters of Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 8, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A man carries fish in the waters of Guanabara Bay in Sao Goncalo Brazil, January 7, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An airplane flies in front of the sun as it sets above the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 6, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A man carries his bicycle as he leaves his house on Paqueta island in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 13, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A view of the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 7, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A girl paddles on her stand-up board on the waters of Guanabara bay at Bica beach in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 10, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Adriel Oliveira, 35, who works on civil construction and has fished on Guanabara Bay for 16 years, carries a bag of fish in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 6, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A fisherman carries a bag of fish as he walks in a channel which flows into Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 7, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Children play in the waters of Guanabara bay at Bica beach in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, January 10, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A woman walks with her dog on Paqueta island in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, April 12, 2016. Few features capture the beauty, or the problems, of one of the world's most dramatic urban landscapes like Guanabara Bay - the finger-like inlet that forms the shoreline and harbor for Rio de Janeiro. The bay, which carves into southeast Brazil from the Atlantic Ocean, literally gave Rio its name when Portuguese mariners mistook it for a "rio," or "river." Four centuries later, the bay is preparing to welcome another sort of seafarer - Olympic sailors, who will navigate the bay when the 2016 Rio Olympics kick off in August. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "GUANABARA MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
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Solange dos Santos manages the Favelinha hostel, where the daily rate for a double bed room is about $30, compared with $250 at nearby three-star hotels.

"It is difficult to establish a hostel inside a favela, with everything that we know goes on in favelas," she said.

"But that is changing because people are coming and interacting with the people, and saying, 'Wow, this isn't anything like what we've heard about!' There is peace and tranquility here."

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Olympic torch arrives in Brazil
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