Lou Holtz endorsed Donald Trump because he likes his hotels and golf courses

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Trump's full-court press in Indiana

As the race for the White House continues to heat up and we're getting closer to knowing who the nominees for each major political party will be, the attention of all campaigns is on Indiana, which holds its suddenly all-important primary on Tuesday.

The front runner on the Republican side, Donald Trump, as picked up several endorsements lately from popular sports figures in the Hoosier State. Last week, it was former Indiana Hoosiers basketball coach Bob Knight who introduced Trump at a rally.

SEE ALSO: Bob Knight will endorse Donald Trump at Indianapolis rally

Now, former Notre Dame Fighting Irish head football coach Lou Holtz who is saying he wants Donald Trump as the next commander in chief. In an online video, Holtz explained the reason for his endorsement and it's just as crazy as you would expect coming from the polarizing former sideline general:

Now, before the hate mail from Donald Trump supporters starts coming in, I'm not calling Holtz crazy for endorsing Trump in the GOP primaries. I'm saying the idea of voting for someone because his "golf courses and hotels are first class" is the reason people are growing tired of politics.

There are most likely people voting for all the candidates in both major parties that are supporting their candidate for equally insane reasons. If you haven't already had a chance to vote in your state's primary (or you have and now wait for the general election), please study the candidates positions and make a decision based on more than the fluffiness of towels or how the greens play.

Donald Trump currently sits in the lead in both Indiana, with a win pushing him even closer to the Republican Party's nomination. On the Democratic Party side, former Secretary of State and U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton is all but assured of the nomination even if she loses every state left to Senator Bernie Sanders.

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Lou Holtz endorsed Donald Trump because he likes his hotels and golf courses

#25 Dabo Swinney — $3.31 million

School: Clemson

Conference: ACC

School Salary: $3.30 million

Other Pay: $5,200

Potential Bonus: $1.13 million

Championships (conference/national)*: 1/0

One thing to know: Swinney is in line for a big pay day after guiding the Tigers to undefeated regular season and the No. 1 ranking for most of the season.

Entering the 2015 season

 (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

#24 Jim Mora — $3.35 million

School: UCLA 

Conference: Pac-12

School Salary: $3.35 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $0.93 million

Championships (conference/national): 0/0

One thing to know: After reports that he was interested in returning to the NFL prior to the season, Mora was quick to shoot those down, saying, "You know how those guys are. Sometimes they just make stuff up, and throw it out there, and see if it sticks."

(Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

#23 Chris Petersen — $3.40 million

School: Washington

Conference: Pac-12

School Salary: $3.40 million

Other Pay: $2,940

Potential Bonus: $1.18 million

Championships (conference/national): 5/0

One thing to know: Washington lured Peterson away from Boise State in 2013 by making him the highest-paid coach in the Pac-12, a distinction he still holds. Earlier this season, Peterson returned to Boise to face the Broncos, something he called "awkward."

(Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

#22 Butch Jones — $3.63 million

School: Tennessee

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $3.61 million

Other Pay: $23,000

Potential Bonus: $1.00 million

Championships (conference/national): 4/0

One thing to know: Despite already being under contract through 2018, the Vols gave Jones an extension at the end of the 2014 season that now has him under contract through 2020.

(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

#21 Mike Gundy — $3.65 million

School: Oklahoma State

Conference: Big 12

School Salary: $3.65 million

Other Pay: not reported

Potential Bonus: $0.55 million

Championships (conference/national): 1/0

One thing to know: Mike Gundy is still a coach at Oklahoma State, but he's not 40 anymore (he's 48).

(Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

#20 Mark Dantonio — $3.67 million

School: Michigan State

Conference: Big Ten

School Salary: $3.67 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $0.65 million

Championships (conference/national): 2/0

One thing to know: Despite all his success and a championship contender this season, Dantonio is just the fifth-highest-paid coach in the Big Ten.

(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

#19 Gary Patterson — $3.94 million

School: Texas Christian

Conference: Big 12

School Salary: $3.94 million

Other Pay: not reported

Potential Bonus: not reported

Championships (conference/national): 6/0

One thing to know: When Patterson took over TCU in 2000, they were in the WAC conference. Since then, they have moved to Conference USA, the Mountain West, and now into an annual championship contender as a member of one of the lucrative Power-5 conferences, the Big 12. 

 (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

#18 Bret Bielema — $3.96 million

School: Arkansas

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $3.95 million

Other Pay: $6,500

Potential Bonus: $1.00 million

Championships (conference/national): 3/0

One thing to know: Bielema averaged 10 wins per year at Wisconsin. In his first two seasons at Arkansas he averaged five wins. Despite that, Arkansas gave him an extension prior to this season that will go through the 2020 season.

(Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)

#17 Jim McElwain — $3.98 million

School: Florida

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $3.98 million

Other Pay: not reported

Potential Bonus: $0.45 million

Championships (conference/national): 0/0

One thing to know: After turning a three-win Colorado State program into a 10-win team in just three years in his first head-coaching gig, the Gators snatched up McElwain and made him the ninth-highest-paid coach in the SEC.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

#16 Gary Pinkel — $4.02 million

School: Missouri

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $3.77 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $0.73 million

Championships (conference/national): 1/0

One thing to know: Missouri has had six 10-win seasons in their history. Five of those have come since Pinkel took over in 2001. However, this will be his last season with Mizzou as he announced he will retire as result of being diagnosed with lymphoma.

 (AP Photo/Samantha Baker)

#15 Kirk Ferentz — $4.08 million

School: Iowa

Conference: Big Ten

School Salary: $4.08 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $2.38 million

Championships (conference/national): 2/0

One thing to know:  In an era when 72% of college coaches are gone within their first five seasons at a school, Ferentz has now been the head coach at Iowa for 17 seasons. With the retirement of Frank Beamer at Virginia Tech, Ferentz and Bob Stoops are now the longest-tenured coaches in FBS.

(AP Photo/AJ Mast)

#14 Gus Malzahn — $4.10 million

School: Auburn

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $4.10 million

Other Pay: $4,500

Potential Bonus: $1.40 million

Championships (conference/national): 2/0

One thing to know: Malzahn led Auburn to the BCS Championship game in his first season as head coach at Auburn. That earned him an early extension. But since then, things have been less rewarding, with an eight-win season in 2014 and a 6-6 regular season this year.

(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

#13 Mark Richt — $4.12 million

School: Georgia

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $4.00 million

Other Pay: $124,000

Potential Bonus: $1.80 million

Championships (conference/national): 2/0

One thing to know: After 15 seasons, Richt was fired as head coach following a 9-3 regular season. He quickly landed on his feet, as he is the new head coach at Miami.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

#12 Art Briles — $4.24 million

School: Baylor

Conference: Big 12

School Salary: $4.24 million

Other Pay: $2,500

Potential Bonus: not reported

Championships (conference/national): 3/0

One thing to know: Briles' high-scoring offense has turned Baylor into a perennial championship contender. Baylor is on their way to their fourth 10-win season in the last five years. They had one 10-win season in 102 seasons before Briles' arrival. At 59, Briles may now be a lifer, as he is under contract through 2023.

(AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

#11 Dan Mullen — $4.28 million

School: Mississippi State

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $4.00 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $0.90 million

Championships (conference/national): 0/0

One thing to know: Mullen is from the Urban Meyer coaching tree, having served under the Ohio State coach at both Utah and Florida. After leading Mississippi State to their fifth-straight bowl game, he was given an extension and a raise this past offseason.

 (AP Photo/Jim Lytle)

#10 Hugh Freeze — $4.31 million

School: Mississippi

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $4.30 million

Other Pay: $10,000

Potential Bonus: $0.98 million

Championships (conference/national): 1/0

One thing to know: Freeze received an extension following the 2014 season that has him under contract through 2018. For the second year in a row, Ole Miss had playoff aspirations, only to fall off the pace.

(AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

#9 Les Miles — $4.39 million

School: Louisiana State

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $4.30 million

Other Pay: $88,721

Potential Bonus: $0.70 million

Championships (conference/national): 2/1

One thing to know: After several reports that the school was prepared to buy out the approximately $15 million remaining on his contract, the school announced that Miles will remain head coach. There is plenty of speculation that the school changed their mind when they failed to get a strong commitment from Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher to replace Miles.

 (AP Photo/Jonathan Bachman)

#8 James Franklin — $4.40 million

School: Penn State

Conference: Big Ten

School Salary: $4.40 million

Other Pay: not reported

Potential Bonus: $1.00 million

Championships (conference/national): 0/0

One thing to know: It took a lot of money to lure Franklin away from Vanderbilt and the SEC after Bill O'Brien abandoned Penn State after just two years. But so far it appears to be a good move, as Franklin appears to have the once powerhouse school moving back in the right direction.

(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

#7 Kevin Sumlin — $5 million

School: Texas A&M

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $5.00 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $1.35 million

Championships (conference/national): 0/0

One thing to know: With all the wealthy alumni opening their wallets, the rich Texas recruiting pool, and the allure of the SEC, it can be argued that Sumlin has the best coaching job in college football. Of course, eventually pressure will mount, and the school is going to want more than just eight to nine wins per season.

(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

#6 Charlie Strong — $5.10 million

School: Texas

Conference: Big 12

School Salary: $5.10 million

Other Pay: $270

Potential Bonus: $1.00 million

Championships (conference/national): 2/0

One thing to know: In 112 seasons before Charlie Strong, Texas had 13 losing seasons. Strong now has two in two years. Will he get a third shot?

(AP Photo/Raymond Thompson)

#5 Jimbo Fisher — $5.15 million

School: Florida State

Conference: ACC

School Salary: $5.15 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $1.48 million

Championships (conference/national): 3/1

One thing to know: Things might have been much different for Fisher if the University of Alabama board of trustees did not reject his contract to become head coach at Alabama-Birmingham in 2007. Nowadays, Fisher says he is glad they did.

(AP Photo/John Raoux)

#4 Bob Stoops — $5.40 million

School: Oklahoma

Conference: Big 12

School Salary: $5.40 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $0.83 million

Championships (conference/national): 8/1

One thing to know: Stoops has never had a losing season in 17 seasons as a head coach. Stoops has a storied coaching pedigree having served under Hayden Fry (who has one of the all-time great coaching trees), Bill Snyder (another Fry disciple), and Steve Spurrier. 

(AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)

#3 Urban Meyer — $5.86 million

School: Ohio State

Conference: Big Ten

School Salary: $5.86 million

Other Pay: $0

Potential Bonus: $0.78 million

Championships (conference/national): 5/3

One thing to know: After Meyer won his third national championship as a head coach during the 2014 season, he was rewarded with an extension, and yet he is still just the second-highest-paid coach in the Big Ten. 

(AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

#2 Jim Harbaugh — $7 million

School: Michigan

Conference: Big Ten

School Salary: $7.00 million

Other Pay: not reported

Potential Bonus: $1.18 million

Championships (conference/national): 0/0

One thing to know: Harbaugh's annual salary is somewhere in the neighborhood of $5 million, but he also received a $2 million signing bonus to join the University of Michigan. Considering how quickly he turned the program around, as well as rumors of a return to the NFL, that base salary will almost certainly jump this off-season.

(AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

#1 Nick Saban — $7.09 million

School: Alabama

Conference: SEC

School Salary: $6.93 million

Other Pay: $0.16 million

Potential Bonus: $0.70 million

Championships (conference/national): 6/4

One thing to know: For highly successful coaches like Saban it can be difficult to determine just how much their job is worth financially. For example, shortly after flirting with the University of Texas in 2014, Saban got a new deal with Alabama and also had the $3 million mortgage on his house paid off by a foundation backed by University of Alabama boosters.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)
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