Heartwarming photos show 171 dogs getting rescued from a South Korean meat farm

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It's a happy ending for the 171 dogs who were rescued this month and narrowly escaped death, thanks to efforts made by the Humane Society International.

The puppies and dogs were rescued from a farm in Wonju, South Korea, where they had been raised and caged with the intention of being sold for human consumption.

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The owner of the farm, Gong In-Young, contacted HSI himself as a way to get out of the industry. "It's a dying business," he said, as he watched the dogs get removed from the facility he had been running for almost a decade.

HSI gladly agreed to help him close the farm's doors once and for all, and arrived on the scene to help clear out the rows and rows of K-9s.

More photos from the heartwarming rescue:

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Heartwarming photos show 171 dogs getting rescued from a South Korean meat farm
Lola Webber and Adam Parascola (R) of the Humane Society International (HSI) transfer a caged dog into a crate for transport during a publicised rescue event involving the closure of a dog farm organised by HSI in Wonju, south East of Seoul on April 27, 2016. The dogs were being transported to the US. The business was the fifth and the largest dog meat farm to be closed down by the US-based Humane Society International (HSI). The dogs in the farm, one of thousands across the country, were bred specifically for consumption and confined in their cages from birth until slaughtered for their meat. South Koreans are believed to consume somewhere between 1.5 million-2.5 million dogs every year, but the meat farming industry is in decline, with little demand among the younger generation. / AFP / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the Humane Society International (HSI) load dogs into crates for transport during a publicised rescue event involving the closure of a dog farm organised by HSI in Wonju, south East of Seoul on April 27, 2016. The dogs were being transported to the US. The business was the fifth and the largest dog meat farm to be closed down by the US-based Humane Society International (HSI). The dogs in the farm, one of thousands across the country, were bred specifically for consumption and confined in their cages from birth until slaughtered for their meat. South Koreans are believed to consume somewhere between 1.5 million-2.5 million dogs every year, but the meat farming industry is in decline, with little demand among the younger generation. / AFP / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Lola Webber and Adam Parascola (L) of the Humane Society International (HSI) carry a dog in a crate to a waiting truck for transport during a publicised rescue event involving the closure of a dog farm organised by HSI in Wonju, south East of Seoul on April 27, 2016. The dogs were being transported to the US. The business was the fifth and the largest dog meat farm to be closed down by the US-based Humane Society International (HSI). The dogs in the farm, one of thousands across the country, were bred specifically for consumption and confined in their cages from birth until slaughtered for their meat. South Koreans are believed to consume somewhere between 1.5 million-2.5 million dogs every year, but the meat farming industry is in decline, with little demand among the younger generation. / AFP / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Lola Webber of the Humane Society International (HSI) comforts a dog in a cage during a publicised rescue event involving the closure of a dog farm organised by HSI in Wonju, south East of Seoul on April 27, 2016. The dogs were being transported to the US. The business was the fifth and the largest dog meat farm to be closed down by the US-based Humane Society International (HSI). The dogs in the farm, one of thousands across the country, were bred specifically for consumption and confined in their cages from birth until slaughtered for their meat. South Koreans are believed to consume somewhere between 1.5 million-2.5 million dogs every year, but the meat farming industry is in decline, with little demand among the younger generation. / AFP / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Dogs sit in a cage during a publicised rescue event involving the closure of a dog farm organised by Humane Society International (HSI) in Wonju, south East of Seoul on April 27, 2016. The dogs were being transported to the US. The business was the fifth and the largest dog meat farm to be closed down by the US-based Humane Society International (HSI). The dogs in the farm, one of thousands across the country, were bred specifically for consumption and confined in their cages from birth until slaughtered for their meat. South Koreans are believed to consume somewhere between 1.5 million-2.5 million dogs every year, but the meat farming industry is in decline, with little demand among the younger generation. / AFP / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Lola Webber and Adam Parascola (R) of the Humane Society International (HSI) transfer a caged dog into a crate for transport during a publicised rescue event involving the closure of a dog farm organised by HSI in Wonju, south East of Seoul on April 27, 2016. The dogs were being transported to the US. The business was the fifth and the largest dog meat farm to be closed down by the US-based Humane Society International (HSI). The dogs in the farm, one of thousands across the country, were bred specifically for consumption and confined in their cages from birth until slaughtered for their meat. South Koreans are believed to consume somewhere between 1.5 million-2.5 million dogs every year, but the meat farming industry is in decline, with little demand among the younger generation. / AFP / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
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According to Newsy, "Most South Koreans don't eat dog meat regularly, but it is consumed more during the annual Bok Nal festival and throughout the hot summer months because many believe it cools their blood."

After being rescued, the majority of the pups will head to the United States, where they will be placed in temporary emergency shelters.

Check out HSI's website, where you can donate to help them put an end to more of the thousands of remaining dog farms across Asia.

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