1 state could be abandoning Obamacare after Election Day

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Colorado Voters Might Replace Obamacare With ColoradoCare

Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign is winding down, and hopes on the left of a national attempt at a public health care system that would replace the Affordable Care Act are winding down with it. But Colorado might just take a crack at it on its own.

On Election Day in November, Coloradans will be voting on a ballot measure on instituting ColoradoCare, a public health care system that by many measures resembles Sanders' proposal for a "Medicare-for-all" system. As the New York Times reports, if the measure passed it would kick into gear in 2019 and set up a massive health cooperative, establish universal coverage and eliminate deductibles.

The plan has a $38 billion price tag and would be paid for with new payroll and investment income taxes, but if all goes according to a plan, it would end up saving money for people in the state in the long run.

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Advocates for ColoradoCare have their work cut out for them. The Times reports that business interests, insurance groups, Republican and Democratic lawmakers — including the state's current and previous governor — have already begun to push back against it. They're inclined to stick with and improve upon the private model as enhanced by the Affordable Care Act, and have painted the up-front costs as a non-starter. Colorado also has a history of aversion to tax increases, and in the 1990s passed a "Taxpayer Bill of Rights" through a ballot measure that amended the state constitution to strictly restrict spending.

But if there's any year for unorthodox policies that challenge the institutional status quo to gain traction, this would be it. Advocates for public health care in the state are just going to have to do a better job than Sanders did of selling it.

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1 state could be abandoning Obamacare after Election Day
Nuns, including Sister Maria Kolbe, right, of the Order of St. Francis, from Mishawaka, Ind., rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, March 23, 2016, as the court hears arguments to allow birth control in healthcare plans in the Zubik vs. Burwell case. The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge from faith-based groups that object to an Obama administration effort to ensure their employees and students can get cost-free birth control. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Nuns supporting Little Sisters of the Poor, attend a rally in front of the US Supreme Court, March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Today the high court will hear arguments in Little Sisters v. Burwell, which will examine whether the governments new health care regulation will require the Little Sisters to change their healthcare plan, to other services that violate Catholic teaching. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Nuns supporting Little Sisters of the Poor, attend a rally in front of the US Supreme Court, March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Today the high court will hear arguments in Little Sisters v. Burwell, which will examine whether the governments new health care regulation will require the Little Sisters to change their healthcare plan, to other services that violate Catholic teaching. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Nuns supporting Little Sisters of the Poor, attend a rally in front of the US Supreme Court, March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Today the high court will hear arguments in Little Sisters v. Burwell, which will examine whether the governments new health care regulation will require the Little Sisters to change their healthcare plan, to other services that violate Catholic teaching. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Nuns supporting Little Sisters of the Poor, attend a rally in front of the US Supreme Court, March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Today the high court will hear arguments in Little Sisters v. Burwell, which will examine whether the governments new health care regulation will require the Little Sisters to change their healthcare plan, to other services that violate Catholic teaching. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Nuns supporting Little Sisters of the Poor, attend a rally in front of the US Supreme Court, March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Today the high court will hear arguments in Little Sisters v. Burwell, which will examine whether the governments new health care regulation will require the Little Sisters to change their healthcare plan, to other services that violate Catholic teaching. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Nuns supporting Little Sisters of the Poor, attend a rally in front of the US Supreme Court, March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Today the high court will hear arguments in Little Sisters v. Burwell, which will examine whether the governments new health care regulation will require the Little Sisters to change their healthcare plan, to other services that violate Catholic teaching. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Kate Perelman of Silver Spring, Md., left, with Americans United for Separation of Church and State, holds a sign saying "Notorious IUD" as a play on words with the nickname for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as she, and others, rally in support of birth control access regardless of employer, Wednesday, March 23, 2016, outside the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge from faith-based groups that object to an Obama administration effort to ensure their employees and students can get cost-free birth control. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
FILE - In this March 25, 2015, file photo, Margot Riphagen, of New Orleans, wears a birth control pills costume as she protests in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, as the court heard oral arguments in the challenges of President Barack Obama's health care law requirement that businesses provide their female employees with health insurance that includes access to contraceptives. Some insurance plans offered on the health marketplaces violate the lawâs requirements for womenâs health, according to a new report from a womenâs legal advocacy group. The National Womenâs Law Center analyzed plans in 15 states over two years and found some excluded dependents from maternity coverage, prohibited coverage of breast pumps or failed to cover all federally approved birth control methods. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
FILE - In this March 25, 2015, file photo, protestors one wearing a birth control pills costume participate in a demonstration in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, as the court heard oral arguments in the challenges of President Barack Obama's health care law requirement that businesses provide their female employees with health insurance that includes access to contraceptives. Religion, birth control and the Obama health care overhaul are about to collide at the Supreme Court yet again. Faith-affiliated charities, colleges and hospitals that oppose some or all contraception as immoral are battling the Obama administration over rules that allow them to opt out of covering the contraceptives for women that are among a range of preventive services that must be included in health plans at no extra cost. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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