Bison expected to become America's national mammal

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Bison Expected To Become America's National Mammal

If everything goes as planned, the bison will soon become the National Mammal of the U.S., reports the Huffington Post.

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According to the Washington Post, the legislation known as National Bison Legacy Act has already passed in the House of Representatives, and there are indications it will make it through the Senate without complications.

See wood bison restoration in Alaska:

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Wood Bison restoration - Alaska (used in article #21156227)
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Bison expected to become America's national mammal
A bull wood bison weighing upward of 2,000 pounds browses in a field at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center on Sunday, March 22, 2015, in Portage, Alaska. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Sunday moved the first wood bison to a staging area in Shageluk, Alaska, for reintroduction in a few week to their native Alaska grazing grounds. Wood bison, which are larger than plains bison native found in Lower 48 states, disappeared from U.S. soil more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
Wood bison cows browse and rest at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center on Sunday, March 22, 2015, in Portage, Alaska. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Sunday trucked the first wood bison to Anchorage for a flight to a staging area in Shageluk, Alaska. They will be released in a few weeks as part of a plan to restore wild wood bison to U.S. soil. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
Two juvenile wood bison run through a chute toward a special "bison container" at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center on Sunday, March 22, 2015, in Portage, Alaska. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Sunday used two of the 20-foot containers to move 30 juveniles, bison 2 years old or younger, to a staging area in Shageluk, Alaska, for reintroduction in a few week to nearby grazing grounds. Wood bison, which are larger than plains bison native found in Lower 48 states, disappeared from U.S. soil more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
A bull wood bison weighing upward of 2,000 pounds moves toward higher ground at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center on Sunday, March 22, 2015, in Portage, Alaska. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Sunday began moving wood bison to a staging area in Shageluk, Alaska, for reintroduction in a few week to their native Alaska grazing grounds. Wood bison, which are larger than plains bison native found in Lower 48 states, disappeared from U.S. soil more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
A bull wood bison weighing upward of 2,000 pounds chews hay at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center on Friday, March 20, 2015, in Portage, Alaska. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is moving wood bison to a staging area in Shageluk, Alaska, for reintroduction to their native Alaska grazing grounds. Wood bison, which are larger than plains bison native found in Lower 48 states, disappeared from U.S. soil more than a century ago., Alaska. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
This photo taken in the fall of 2012 shows wood bison at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center near Portage, Alaska. Wood bison could be released in southwest Alaska as soon as 2014 under an agreement worked out by state and federal wildlife officials and announced Thursday, Jan. 17 2013. (AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
File-In this Wed. March 21,2012 file photo provided by Ted Wood shows bison, newly relocated from Yellowstone National Park in a holding area on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in northeast Montana. A hearing is scheduled today Wed. April 11,2012 on a restraining order that blocks further relocation of Yellowstone National Park bison after Gov. Brian Schweitzer's administration transferred 62 Yellowstone bison to the Fort Peck Reservation last month. (AP Photo/Ted Wood, TheStoryGroup,File)
FILE - In this June 12, 1996 file photo, Two bull bison lock horns on the Burton's ranch at Narrow Cape on Kodiak Island, Alaska. A proposed relocation of endangered bison to the Alaska Interior faces opposition from a state lawmaker who fears the animals could be used to deny access to the land. Representative Alan Dick of Stony River is proposing a bill that would require the Department of Fish and Game to get legislative approval before moving approximately 90 endangered wood bison from Girdwood to a plot of land around the lower Innoko River. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, file)
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Once approved, the mighty land animal will join the country's other national symbols, the bald eagle, the oak tree, and the rose, notes the Guardian.

Though the bison was once plentiful throughout the area now known as the United States, the white settlers' desire to claim western land occupied by Native Americans nearly rendered it extinct.

The mass killing of the buffalo was employed as a tactic to weaken those who depended upon the animal for both physical and spiritual sustenance.

Rebuilding bison populations became increasingly popular throughout the 20th century, and such efforts have proven to be quite successful.

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