Trump: 'I consider myself the presumptive nominee, absolutely'

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"I consider myself the presumptive nominee" - Trump

Donald Trump declared himself the "presumptive nominee" in a victory speech from Trump Tower on Tuesday night, after dominating five Republican presidential-primary contests.

Shortly after the polls closed on Tuesday evening, several networks projected that the real-estate mogul would sweep through the day's five primary contests. He won primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Rhode Island, Delaware, and Pennsylvania.

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Trump: 'I consider myself the presumptive nominee, absolutely'

5. John Kasich, Republican, Ohio governor

Kasich picked up momentum last month with a win in his home state's primary.

But the road before, and since, has been virtually empty for the Ohio governor. He has no chance to accumulate enough delegates to clinch the nomination before the convention, so he's banking that he can win a floor fight.

Kasich's rivals have seemed to grow increasingly frustrated with his presence in the race — Trump said he would "automatically win" if Kasich were to drop out of the race. Cruz, meanwhile, has shifted his stance on Kasich's presence in the race, teaming up with the Ohio governor in a last-ditch effort to stop Trump.

Those who talk up Kasich say he is a successful governor of a swing state with a record to point to and clear bipartisan appeal. He also has abundant experience from nearly two decades in Congress, including foreign-policy areas and his time as chair of the US House budget committee.

But that same bipartisan brand has hurt Kasich with the GOP base. He is to the left of most GOP candidates on immigration reform, and he expanded the federal Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act — two issues that could doom him with hard-line conservatives.

National polling average among Republican voters: 22.3% (3rd)
Average in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Connecticut, and Indiana polls: 23.9% (3rd)

DELEGATES: 148
STOCK: Falling
Last month: 5

(Photo via REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

4. Bernie Sanders, Democrat, senator from Vermont

Sanders had perhaps the best single day of his campaign late last month, romping to landslide victories in Alaska, Hawaii, and Washington. But he got tripped up in New York, with a bigger-than-expected loss to Clinton in her adopted home state.

And he faces challenging odds — he needs to win about 71% of the remaining pledged delegates to overtake Clinton in the pledged-delegate count, according to NBC.

Moving forward, the map doesn't look especially favorable. In a system in which delegates are allocated proportionally, it will be hard for him to make up real ground in large states like California, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland.

National polling average among Democratic voters: 46% (2nd)
Average in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Connecticut, and Indiana polls: 40% (2nd)

DELEGATES: 1,153
STOCK: Falling
Last month: 4

(Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

3. Ted Cruz, Republican, senator from Texas

Cruz always had favorable ground in Wisconsin. After that, the map was supposed to get more challenging — and it has.

Late April has overwhelmingly featured Northeast and mid-Atlantic contests more favorable to Trump — including delegate-rich New York, which Trump won with more than 60% of the vote. With more states from the regions on the map to come, Indiana's May 3 primary is looking more and more like a must-win for the Texas senator.

Still, Cruz inspires a flood of enthusiasm among the GOP base, and he may be the best-positioned candidate from within the political sphere to back up the notion that he's not a typical politician, that he is the outsider the base wants despite his day job in Washington.

National polling average among Republican voters: 30.3% (2nd)
Average in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Connecticut, and Indiana polls: 24.7% (2nd)

DELEGATES: 559
STOCK: Falling
Last month: 3

(Photo via REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

2. Donald Trump, Republican, businessman

Trump has lit the political world on fire since his entry into the race last summer, and he has showed surprising staying power. We're now on month No. 11 of "The Trump Show."

He has won a majority of contests so far, a feat unthinkable when he entered the race in June. He appears poised to at least enter the convention with the most delegates of any Republican candidate — and after a gigantic win in New York, he seems better positioned to capture the nomination heading into the convention.

There's a clear appetite among Republican primary voters for someone like Trump, who entered the race to controversy surrounding his position on illegal immigration. Business Insider discovered more of that when we followed him on the trail for a week last year.

National polling average among Republican voters: 42.3% (1st)
Average in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Connecticut, and Indiana polls: 44.6% (3rd)

DELEGATES: 845
STOCK: Rising
Last month: 2

(Photo via REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

1. Hillary Clinton, Democrat, former secretary of state

The delegate math is on Clinton's side going forward, especially now that she has avoided her biggest potential pitfall in the New York primary.

The long-presumed Democratic nominee, Clinton has been a shakier-than-expected candidate. But she has a clear look at the nomination, and she would enter the general election with a slight advantage over Trump — or Cruz.

"I'm not going to be responding to him," Clinton said in a recent interview with Business Insider. "I have pretty thick skin. I've been in the arena a long time, and that means that I am not going to get down with him and go insult for insult."

Check out that full interview here.

National polling average among Democratic voters: 49.3% (1st)
Average in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Connecticut, and Indiana polls: 51.9% (1st)

DELEGATES: 1,428
STOCK: Rising
Last month: 1

REUTERS/Charles Mostoller

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While Trump doesn't yet have the 1,237 delegates he needs to lock down the Republican presidential nomination, he doesn't seem to have much doubt left that he will get there.

"I consider myself the presumptive nominee, absolutely," Trump said during a speech and press conference at Trump Tower in New York City.

SEE ALSO: Trump scores major victories

He said later: "As far as I'm concerned, it's over."

Trump said that his rivals for the GOP nomination, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, "should really get out of the race."

Data curated by InsideGov

"They have no path to the nomination," he said. "... They should get out of the race, and we should heal the Republican Party."

Trump insisted that he can unify a Republican Party that seems increasingly divided.

"I'm a unifier. I unify people," he said. "That's how I did it in business. ... We will have people that are backing this party and backing my candidacy that you wouldn't believe. We're going to have such unity."

SEE ALSO: Trump: 'If Hillary Clinton were a man...'

On Sunday, Kasich and Cruz announced an alliance to essentially halt campaigning in certain states where the other candidate has a clear advantage in an attempt to block Trump from winning the nomination.

Photos from yesterday's primaries and candidate rallies:

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April 26 primaries, candidate rallies
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Trump: 'I consider myself the presumptive nominee, absolutely'
A voter leaves the booth after casting her ballot in the Pennsylvania primary at a polling place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., April 26, 2016. Nearly half of Americans believe that the system that U.S. political parties use to pick their candidates for the White House is "rigged" and two-thirds want to see the process changed, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller/File Photo
PHILADELPHIA, PA - On Pennsylvania Primary Night, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at the Philadelphia Convention Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Tuesday evening April 26, 2016. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, at right. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 26: Surrounded by his supporters, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the media at Trump Tower following primary election results on April 26, 2016 in New York, NY. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - On Pennsylvania Primary Night, supporters gather and cheer awaiting voting results at former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's victory party at the Philadelphia Convention Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Tuesday evening April 26, 2016. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WHEATON, MD- APR26: Maryland voters at the Piney Branch Elementary school during Maryland's primary election, April 26, 2016. (Photo by Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
KENSINGTON, MD- APR26: Voters leave the polls at Temple Emanuel in Kensington, Maryland, April 26, 2016, during Maryland's primary election. (Photo by Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
GREENBELT, MD APRIL 26, 2016-People voting at the Eleanor Roosvelt high school polling site on April 26, 2016 in Greenbelt, Md.(Photo by Mark Gail/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, pauses while speaking during a campaign event in Huntington, West Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, April 26, 2016. Sanders' single win in Rhode Island out of the five contests held on Tuesday puts his opponent Hillary Clinton on the brink of the Democratic presidential nomination. Photographer: Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An attendee displays a Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, themed smart phone case during a campaign event in Huntington, West Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, April 26, 2016. Sanders' single win in Rhode Island out of the five contests held on Tuesday puts his opponent Hillary Clinton on the brink of the Democratic presidential nomination. Photographer: Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Republican U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Ted Cruz waves to supporters while being accompanied by his daughters Caroline (L) and Catherine (R) during his five state primary night rally held at the Hoosier Gym in Knightstown, Indiana, U.S., April 26, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at her presidential primary election night rally, Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
A few campaign workers sit outside the small polling location called the Simpson Voting House in New Alexandria, Pa., during the Pennsylvania primary election, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. Pennsylvania voters choose presidential candidates, pick a Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate and nominate a Republican and Democrat to run for attorney general. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders speaks during his five state primary night rally in Huntington, West Virginia, U.S., April 26, 2016. REUTERS/Marcus Constantino
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If Trump does not reach the 1,237-delegate threshold, he could run into problems attempting to secure the nomination. Cruz has continually outmaneuvered Trump in electing delegates to the Republican National Convention. If Trump does not win 1,237 delegates, many convention delegates would become "unbound" to Trump in later rounds of convention voting, giving Cruz or Kasich a likely boost in support.

Maxwell Tani contributed to this report.

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