Here's what future cemeteries may look like

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

Here's What Future Cemeteries May Look Like

Cemeteries of the future may look and function much differently than the ones commonly used today.

SEE ALSO: Electric worker caught on camera brutally beating customer's dogs

Smithsonian.com is reporting that a team from Columbia University recently won a contest to design a next generation burial site.

Their proposal, called Sylvan Constellation, features a wooded path with lighted vessels that get their glow from the gasses emitted by decomposing remains.

RELATED: Lavish pet cemeteries in China:

17 PHOTOS
NTP Lavish pet cemeteries in China
See Gallery
Here's what future cemeteries may look like
Tomb of pet cat Pangmi, with its picture, is seen at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A bear doll is seen beside the tomb of a pet dog ahead of the Qingming Festival at Baifu pet cemetery on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tibetan prayer flags wave above a pet dog's tomb at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A collar is placed on the tomb of pet dog Logan at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the out skirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A doll is left at the tomb of pet dog Logan at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the out skirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Baifu pet cemetery worker Du Huanying decorates a new pet tomb ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 27, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A pet owner stands next to a tomb with a dog statue at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 27, 2016. The Chinese characters on the gravestone read: "Gently you left, but will be in my heart forever."China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Toy cars, water and food are left around the tomb of pet dog Zhang Xiaoqiu at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the out skirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Pet owners walk among graves at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A pet owner (2nd R) and her relatives set up decoration flowers for her pet dog Li Naonao at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Day, on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Baifu pet cemetery worker Zhang Youwang cleans the tomb of pet dog Baobao, which died at the age of 13, during his daily work ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing China, March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Pet owner Qingqiu gestures to her dog, Little Huoban, after she swept the tomb of her previous dog Huoban (which means "Buddy" in Chinese) who died at the age of 15, ahead of the Qingming Festival at Baifu pet cemetery on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Food is placed on the tomb of pet dog Xixi at Baifu pet cemetery ahead of the Qingming Festival on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. The Chinese characters on the gravestone read: "Mommy's only good son." China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A dog doll is placed on the tomb of a pet dog ahead of the Qingming Festival at Baifu pet cemetery on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Pet owner Ma Ying cleans the glass covering her dog Liu Dazhuang's tomb, with bathtub, dolls and decoration flowers placed inside, ahead of the Qingming Festival at Baifu pet cemetery on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 27, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Pet owner Qingqiu smokes next to the tomb of her first dog Huoban (which means "Buddy" in Chinese), who died at the age of 15, ahead of the Qingming Festival at Baifu pet cemetery on the outskirts of Beijing, China March 26, 2016. China celebrates the Qingming tomb-sweeping festival on April 4 this year, with much of the ceremonial ritual of honouring the dead these days not geared towards beloved relatives, but beloved pets. Once banned by Communist leader Chairman Mao Zedong as a bourgeois pastime, having a pet has now become a symbol of financial success in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee SEARCH "PET CEMETERY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

The team's Facebook page further notes, "Embedded in the forest floor or supported by a network of slender steel pylons, this multilevel memorial rises from the earthen territory of traditional burial into an elegant and truly perpetual constellation of light in the blooming woodland canopy above."

According to a press release, the judges at the University of Bath in the U.K. which hosted the competition were particularly impressed with the use of sustainable technologies as well as the "respectful disposition for human remains."

The team from Columbia won the equivalent of more than $7,000 and will be able to spend a month studying a historic cemetery in England.

Read Full Story

People are Reading