Task force finds systemic racism in Chicago police department

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Task Force Finds Systemic Racism in Chicago Police Department

Woefully inadequate. Persistent problem. Justified lack of trust. Those are just a few of the phrases used to describe the Chicago Police Department in a scathing report released Wednesday.

READ MORE: More than 8,000 violent fugitives arrested in nationwide sweep

The Chicago Police Accountability Task Force analyzed almost a decade of data from the CPD, including officer-involved shootings, Taser uses, traffic and street stops, community complaints and disciplinary actions.

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Task force finds systemic racism in Chicago police department

43. Honolulu, Hawaii had 11.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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42. Boise, Idaho had 13.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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41. Fargo, North Dakota had 14.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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40. Eugene, Oregon had 15.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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39. Lincoln, Nebraska had 17.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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38. Sioux Falls, South Dakota had 20.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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37. Billings, Montana had 21.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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36. Norfolk, Virginia had 24.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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35. Providence, Rhode Island had 26.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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34. Manchester, New Hampshire had 28.9 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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33. Louisville, Kentucky had 30.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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32. South Bend, Indiana had 32.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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31. Tucson, Arizona had 32.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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30. North Charleston, South Carolina had 34.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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29. Tacoma, Washington had 36.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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28. Salt Lake City, Utah had 38.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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27. Des Moines, Iowa had 38.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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26. Pueblo, Colorado had 41.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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25. Tulsa, Oklahoma had 41.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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24. New Orleans, Louisiana had 42.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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23. Durham, North Carolina had 42.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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22. Jackson, Mississippi had 43.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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21. North Las Vegas, Nevada had 43.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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20. Wichita, Kansas had 45.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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19. Albuquerque, New Mexico had 48.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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18. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania had 49.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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17. Buffalo, New York had 50.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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16. Newark, New Jersey had 50.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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15. Odessa, Texas had 51.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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14. Tallahassee, Florida had 52.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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13. Anchorage, Alaska had 53.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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12. Springfield, Massachusetts had 54.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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11. Atlanta, Georgia had 55.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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10. Hartford, Connecticut had 55.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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9. Cleveland, Ohio had 61.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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8. Milwaukee, Wisconsin had 65.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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7. Stockton, California had 67.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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6. Baltimore, Maryland had 67.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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5. Rockford, Illinois had 76.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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4. Birmingham, Alabama had 82.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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3. Detroit, Michigan had 83.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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2. Memphis, Tennessee had 84.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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1. St. Louis, Missouri had 88.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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The racial divide in Chicago's population is about equal -- 32 percent of the city is white, 33 percent is black and 29 percent is Hispanic. Keeping that split in mind makes some of the report's data even more alarming.

There were more than 400 officer-involved shootings between 2008 and 2015, and 74 percent of the people hit or killed were African-American.

During traffic stops, black and Hispanic drivers were four times more likely to have their cars searched than white drivers, but contraband was found in the vehicles of white drivers twice as often.

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Task force finds systemic racism in Chicago police department
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel waves to supporters as he leaves a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015 in Chicago, as he and his opponent, Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel phones voters at a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015 in Chicago, as he and his opponent Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel shakes hands at a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015 in Chicago, as he and his opponent, Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks at a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015 in Chicago, as he and his opponent Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel phones voters at a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015 in Chicago, as he and his opponent Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Ramona Parkman welcomes Mayor Rahm Emanuel to a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015, by blowing a Jewish shofar ram's horn on the south side of Chicago. Emanuel and his opponent, Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, continue to rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks at a campaign office Tuesday, April 7, 2015 in Chicago, as he and his opponent Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia rally supporters on the morning of the city's mayoral runoff election. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel shakes hands at a campaign office, Monday, April 6, 2015, in Chicago, as he and his opponent, Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, rally supporters ahead of the city's mayoral runoff election on Tuesday. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel talks to reporters at a campaign office, Monday, April 6, 2015, in Chicago, as he and opponent Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia rally supporters ahead of the city's mayoral runoff election on Tuesday. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel talks to reporters at a campaign office, Monday, April 6, 2015, in Chicago, as he and opponent Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia rally supporters ahead of the city's mayoral runoff election on Tuesday. It's the first runoff since Chicago switched to non-partisan elections 20 years ago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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The task force also points a finger at the department's accountability system, calling it "broken."

From 2007 to 2015, 1,572 officers had 10 or more community complaints filed against them. Sixty-five officers received 30 or more complaints during those nine years. From 2011 to 2015, 40 percent of complaints were never fully investigated.

The task force wrote: "There is no ownership of the issue within CPD leadership or elsewhere. ... These figures demand immediate change."

So how do you make that change happen? The report lists more than two dozen detailed recommendations that aim to empower the community, improve accountability and address other systemic problems.

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Protests in Chicago following Laquan McDonald shooting by police conviction
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Task force finds systemic racism in Chicago police department
Two men are detained near Pioneer Court on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders held a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Apple store employees, top, look to protesters lined up outside the Apple store on North Michigan Avenue, Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders held a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" on Black Friday in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Protesters make their way up North Michigan Avenue on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders hold a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Iggy Flow, right, talks to police officers on North Michigan Avenue on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders hold a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Lamon Reccord, right, stares and yells at a Chicago police officer "Shoot me 16 times" as he and others march through Chicago's Loop Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, one day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, file photo, a protester holds a sign as people rally for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by Chicago Police Department Officer Jason Van Dyke in Chicago. McDonald, whose name demonstrators are shouting as they march the streets and plan to shut down the cityâs glitziest shopping corridor on Friday, lived a troubled life full of disadvantages and at least one previous brush with the law. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
Protesters form a line and walk holding signs that spell out 'Laquan' following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015, in Chicago. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
Demonstrators sit in Michigan Ave. along Chicago's famed Magnificent Mile shopping district, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, during a protest the day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Protesters gesture near Chicago police while trying to enter an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Chicago police form a line to prevent protesters from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters take to the streets in Chicago following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015. (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators confront police during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Chicago Police form a line to keep a protest for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald from entering Grant Park, early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Chicago police form a line to prevent protestors from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Authorities form a line to prevent protesters from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Police stand guard as demonstrators march through downtown during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters scuffle with Chicago police while trying to enter an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters scuffle with Chicago police while trying to enter an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Bus passengers watch as demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Authorities form a line to prevent protesters from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters shut down a street during a protest for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters shut down a street during a protest for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters march during a demonstration for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
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At least one of the report's recommendations, expanding the department's body camera program, is already underway. Earlier this week, Chicago's mayor announced more than 450 body cameras are being shipped to the city this week.

The process of reforming the Chicago Police Department could take awhile, but it seems the new superintendent, Eddie Johnson, confirmed the same day the report was released, is committed to the task.

"We have racism in America, we have racism in Chicago and it stands to reason that we have racism in our agency," Johnson said.

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