Bill Nye warns that a stunning natural wonder is turning into a 'Muddy Hillside'

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Bill Nye Gives Advice For Sustainable Behavior

Did you know that Bill Nye the Science Guy is now Bill Nye the national parks guy? Well, sort of.

The famous science educator is a Centennial Find Your Park Ambassador. He signed up for the gig because he's concerned some of the United State's "astonishingly beautiful" parks are disappearing; and he wants you to care about it.

Nye issued a startling warning to AOL.com over one national park in particular, Glacier National Park. That's the national park from the opening scene of Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining," and a little Tom Hanks film called "Forrest Gump."

According to Nye, Glacier National Park is, "rapidly becoming Muddy Hillside National Park."

Don't take the Science Guy's word for it, take a look at some of these photos:

11 PHOTOS
Glacier National Park
See Gallery
Bill Nye warns that a stunning natural wonder is turning into a 'Muddy Hillside'
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: The Spegazzini glacier stands next to exposed rock, where the glacier once stood, in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: Runoff cascades from the edge of Heim glacier in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: Runoff cascades from the edge of Heim glacier in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: Runoff cascades from the edge of Heim glacier in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: Runoff cascades from the edge of Heim glacier in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: Runoff cascades from the edge of Heim glacier in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 27: The Perito Moreno glacier stands in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 27, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
The Reynolds Creek Wildland Fire burns in Glacier National Park, Montana in this photo taken July 21, 2015. Strong winds and warm temperatures were slowing efforts to contain the 4,000 acre wildfire, forcing campers to evacuate near the eastern entrance and closing part of an iconic roadway popular with tourists, official said. Picture taken July 21, 2015. REUTERS/Erin Conwell
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: The Spegazzini glacier stands in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: The Spegazzini glacier (BOTTOM) and Heim glacier stand in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Nye attributes this major geographical shift to the fact "the world is changing," and he thinks humans are at least partially to blame. He attributes a lot of that change is the result of fossil fuel use and says it "would be best to not burn any fossil fuels ever again."

While he's worried about nature in a big way, his favorite park is a lot more urban than you might expect.

"The Statue of Liberty makes me crazy. My Grandmother married an American Army Captain after the first World War and her contemporaries came through Ellis Island. It really is an amazing thing," he says.

Watch Bill Nye search for his favorite NYC national park:

Ellis Island stands out for very personal reasons.

"Ultimately, it is what national parks can remind its visitors of that makes them so important," he says. "Not only their beauty, or what movies were filmed there, but they also remind us of something bigger."

"National parks remind us of preserving these wild spaces, these historic spaces, so that we can all know and appreciate our place in the ecosystem, our place in nature— and that is priceless," he added.

If you didn't know how important National parks are, well:

Meme Generator

Make sure to check out AOL.com on Earth Day, Friday, April 22nd for more from our exclusive interview with Bill Nye.

Find Your Park -- National park service happy 100th:

More from AOL.com:
What your VHS tapes are worth now
Meet the man who left corporate America to live in a treehouse
17M people's Netflix prices are increasing and they don't even realize it

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners