14-year-old blinded after e-cigarette explodes

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Teenager Intends To Sue After E-Cigarette Explodes In His Face

(PIX11) A 14-year-old is learning an unfortunate and painful lesson about the dangers of vaping.

"I can't see anything because I got a cut through my cornea," said Leor Domatov, 14.

The teenager is completely blind in his left eye after using an electronic cigarette. He faces possibly permanent damage to his hands.

Domatov was testing out one of the devices at the Plaza Vapes kiosk in Brooklyn's Kings Plaza Mall.

"The guy was showing me different products of the vaporizers, said Domatov. "While he was showing me, he connected one of the vaporizers to the battery of the store. He gave it to me to hold and when I was holding it, it exploded in my hands and my face."

State and local laws say it's illegal to sell these products to minors. Leor is only 14.

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14-year-old blinded after e-cigarette explodes
UNITED STATES - JUNE 16: Jody Reavis, an employee of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a unit of Reynolds American Inc., smokes a cigarette during a demonstration against a proposal to raise cigarette taxes in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, June 16, 2009. North Carolina, which grows the most tobacco in the U.S. and is home to Reynolds and Lorillard Inc., is one of at least 25 states where legislators are considering an increase in cigarette taxes to cover budget shortfalls. Reynolds is the second-largest U.S. tobacco company with brands such as Camel, Pall Mall, Kool, Winston, and Doral. (Photo by Jim R. Bounds/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 16: Victoria Gordon, an employee of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a unit of Reynolds American Inc., smokes a Salem cigarette during a demonstration against a proposal to raise cigarette taxes in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, June 16, 2009. North Carolina, which grows the most tobacco in the U.S. and is home to Reynolds and Lorillard Inc., is one of at least 25 states where legislators are considering an increase in cigarette taxes to cover budget shortfalls. Reynolds is the second-largest U.S. tobacco company with brands such as Camel, Pall Mall, Kool, Winston, and Doral. (Photo by Jim R. Bounds/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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An employee at Plaza Vapes tells PIX11 it was only her second day on the job.

We left a message for her boss, but added she was aware of what happened to Leor.

"Leor was being marketed at the entrance of the Kings Plaza Mall," said Marc Freund, a partner at Lipsig, Shapey, Manus and Moverman."A mall that caters to children, and they're marketing these products, causing all these injuries."

Leor's father has since Freund to take on the case.

Freund showed us the stack of ad cards he says the kiosk staff handed out to people walking by.

The card promotes the company's Instagram account, and vaping products that bear a striking resemblance to popular breakfast cereals.

"The duty falls to Kings Plaza and the kiosk owner to make sure there's signs in place to warn the children," said Freund. "There was not even a single sign advising of the city and state law until after this incident takes place."

We also reached out to Kings Plaza management.

We were told there was no one in the office available to comment for our story.

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