Buzz Aldrin explains his thoughts on how to communicate with aliens

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Buzz Aldrin discusses High Frequency Gravity Waves

Legendary NASA astronaut Buzz Aldrin recently talked about colonizing Mars and confirmed his belief in higher lifeforms.

Aldrin stopped by AOL Build last week to promote his new book and while taking questions he said he believes there are more intelligent beings in the universe.

In response to an audience member's question, Aldrin began discussing a science-fiction story he's working on that relates to Star Trek, saying he's "already about halfway there."

RELATED: Fellow astronauts Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko

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Astronauts Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko
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Buzz Aldrin explains his thoughts on how to communicate with aliens

NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko. (Photo via NASA)

This video screen grab taken from NASA, American astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko are interviewed at International Space Station on Wednesday, April 29, 2015. Kelly and Kornienko told The Associated Press during the interview, that flight controllers have given up trying to command the cargo carrier. The unmanned vessel began tumbling shortly after its launch Tuesday from Kazakhstan. The cargo ship contains 3 tons of food, water, fuel, clothes and equipment for the six station residents. Kelly says everything and everyone on board should be OK, even without this shipment. But he says it's still unfortunate. Kornienko calls it "a big concern." (NASA via AP)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2015 image made from video provided by NASA, the nine-member International Space Station crew holds a news conference for journalists around the world. From left are Scott Kelly, Kimiya Yui, Gennady Padalka, Sergey Volkov, Aidyn Aimbetov, Mikhail Kornienko, Oleg Kononenko, Andreas Mogensen and Kjell Lindgren. (NASA via AP)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 27: In this handout provided by NASA, Expedition 43 Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), top, NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, center, and Russian Cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos wave farewell as they board the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft ahead of their launch to the International Space Station on March 27, 2015 in Baikonor, Kazakhstan. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
(L-R) US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko wave from a bus after their space suits were tested at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (R) and Roscosmos cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of Russia pose after a press conference on December 18, 2014 at the UNESCO in Paris. They will embark on a year-long mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in March 2015. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK KOVARIK (Photo credit should read PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/Getty Images)
Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko waves during a sending-off ceremony in the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
US astronaut Scott Kelly waves as his space suit is tested at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome, prior to blasting off to the International Space Station (ISS), late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
From L: US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko take part in a sending-off ceremony in the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time. AFP PHOTO/KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko waves during a sending-off ceremony in the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - This combination of photos provided by the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center via NASA, shows NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, left, and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko. On Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, NASA said the two are just two months shy of launching to the International Space Station for an entire year. Already, though, scientists are clamoring for additional long-term subjects. (AP Photo/Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center via NASA)
STAR CITY, RUSSIA - MARCH 5: In this handout from the In this handout from National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA, (L to R) Expedition 43 Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly pose outside a Soyuz simulator during the second day of qualification exams at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) March 5, 2015 in Star City, Russia. The three are preparing for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 28, 2015. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by /Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
In this photo provided by NASA, Expedition 43 NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly waits to climb the scaffolding to access the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft for his final check with fellow crew members Russian Cosmonauts Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), on Monday, March 23, 2015, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. On Saturday, March 28, 2015, Kelly and cosmonaut Kornienko will travel to the International Space Station to begin a year-long mission living in orbit. (AP Photo/NASA, Bill Ingalls)
In this photo provided by NASA, The Expedition 43 crew; NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, left, Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Russian Cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos, talk to the media prior to departing the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. The trio is preparing for launch to the International Space Station in their Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28. (AP Photo/NASA, Bill Ingalls)
In this Thursday, March 19, 2015 photo provided by NASA, astronaut Scott Kelly, left, plays pool with Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. On Saturday, March 28, 2015, Kelly and Kornienko will travel to the International Space Station to begin a year-long mission living in orbit. (AP Photo/NASA, Bill Ingalls)
In this Sept. 5, 2014 photo provided by NASA, cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, left, of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and astronaut Scott Kelly stand together for a picture at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. In late March 2015, Kelly and Kornienko are scheduled to travel to the International Space Station to begin a year-long mission living in orbit. (AP Photo/NASA, Stephanie Stoll)
STAR CITY, RUSSIA - JANUARY 31: (L to R) NASA astronaut Scott Kelly , RSA cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko during MKS-43/44 survival exercise in case of a crash landing during winter on January 31, 2014 at Russian Space Training Center in Star City, Russia. (Photo by Oleg Nikishin/Kommersant Photo via Getty Images)
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He alluded to an alien civilization that sent humans "all of their smarts" 9,000 years ago, so that we could travel to where they are located in the universe.

When asked if this was science-fiction or his own beliefs, the Apollo 11 pilot called it "the most realistic science-fiction of the past, of the present and of the future that you will ever read."

Aldrin explained the "creatures" used zero-point energy, and then noted the Chinese are currently using high-frequency gravity waves that can "help you travel interstellar distances."

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"A much more high advanced civilization, and we will be there, will communicate by high-frequency gravity waves," he said.

The 86-year-old added that the only thing we may come across while colonizing Mars would be "maybe a defunct creepy crawler."

"I don't think there's a chance of finding anything still alive," he said.

Buzz Aldrin Discusses Higher Life Forms

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