15 jobs where men out-earn women the most

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April 12th Is Equal Pay Day

Many Americans still don't believe that women are, more often than not, paid less than men for doing the same job.

A recent report by Glassdoor helps shed some light on the matter.

Based on more than 534,000 salary reports shared on the job review site, Glassdoor found that women earn on average $0.95 cents for every dollar men earn when you take into account a person's age, education, years of job experience, job title, employer, and location. That's an adjusted gender pay gap of 5.4%.

Overall, when comparing all men to all women, Glassdoor found women earn 24.1% less than what men earn, or $0.76 on the dollar. That number is similar to what the US Census Bureau reports, which is that women in the US working full-time, year-round are paid $0.79 for every dollar paid to men.

Glassdoor jobs biggest wage gapThe gender pay gap varies widely based on occupation, reaching as much as 28.3% — or $0.72 on a man's dollar — for computer programmers. Here are the 15 jobs where we see the largest gap in pay between men and women:

15. Medical technician

14.4% base pay difference

Women earn $0.86 for every $1 men earn.

14. Retail representative

14.6% base pay difference

Women earn $0.85 for every $1 men earn.

13. Information security specialist

14.7% base pay difference

Women earn $0.85 for every $1 men earn.

12. Driver

14.9% base pay difference

Women earn $0.85 for every $1 men earn.

View the gender pay gap ranked state by state:

53 PHOTOS
Gender pay gap state to state ranking
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15 jobs where men out-earn women the most

51. Louisiana 

Gender pay gap: 34.7%

(Ian Dagnall / Alamy)

50. Utah 

Gender pay gap: 32.4%

(CountyLemonade/Flickr)

49. Wyoming 

Gender pay gap: 31.2% 

(Philip Scalia / Alamy)

48. West Virginia

Gender pay gap: 30%

(J. Stephen Conn/Flickr)

47. North Dakota

Gender pay gap: 28.7%

(Tim Evanson/Flickr)

46. Alabama

Gender pay gap: 27.4%

(Danny Hooks / Alamy)

45. Idaho

Gender pay gap: 27.2%

(Philip Scalia / Alamy)

44. Oklahoma

Gender pay gap: 26.5%

(thefixer/Flickr)

43. Montana

Gender pay gap: 25.8%

(John Elk III / Alamy)

42. Michigan

Gender pay gap: 25.5%

(curiousjohn/Flickr)

41. Indiana

Gender pay gap: 24.8%

(ellenm1/Flickr)

40. New Hampshire

Gender pay gap: 24.3%

(cmh2315fl/Flickr)

39. South Dakota

Gender pay gap: 23.8%

(SuperStock / Alamy)

38. Mississippi

Gender pay gap: 23%

(Don Smetzer / Alamy)

37. Kansas

Gender pay gap: 23%

(Jim West / Alamy)

36. Washington

Gender pay gap: 23%

(ASSOCIATED PRESS/NOAA)

35. Iowa

Gender pay gap: 22.7%

(Ellen Isaacs / Alamy) 

34. Missouri

Gender pay gap: 22.6%

(L. Allen Brewer/Flickr)

33. Ohio

Gender pay gap: 22.2%

(sailwings/Flickr)

32. New Mexico

Gender pay gap: 21.9%

(Patrick Ray Dunn / Alamy)

31. Arkansas

Gender pay gap: 21.8%

(Buddy Mays / Alamy)

30. Texas

Gender pay gap: 21.2%

(Ian Dagnall / Alamy)

29.  Maine

Gender pay gap: 21.2%

(PHOTOPHANATIC1/Flickr)

28. Nebraska

Gender pay gap: 21.1%

(Ian G Dagnall / Alamy)

27. Wisconsin 

Gender pay gap: 21.1%

(Jeff Greenberg 5 / Alamy)

26. Illinois

Gender pay gap: 20.9%

(incamerastock / Alamy)

25. Pennsylvania

Gender pay gap: 20.8%

(dannyfowler/Flickr)

24. Kentucky

Gender pay gap: 20.1%

(toddmundt/Flickr)

23. Virginia

Gender pay gap: 19.8%

(JoeDuck/Flickr)

22. South Carolina

Gender pay gap: 19.8%

(Ellisphotos / Alamy)

21. New Jersey 

Gender pay gap: 19.7%

(Robert Quinlan / Alamy)

20. Alaska

Gender pay gap: 19.2%

(retro traveler/Flickr)

19. Delaware

Gender pay gap: 19.0%

(J. Stephen Conn/Flickr)

18. Tennessee

Gender pay gap: 18.5%

(Jim Nix / Nomadic Pursuits/Flickr)

17. Minnesota

Gender pay gap: 18.4%

(kla4067/Flickr)

16. Rhode Island

Gender pay gap: 18.3%

(Dougtone/Flickr)

15. Georgia 

Gender pay gap: 18.2%

(Ian Dagnall Commercial Collection / Alamy)

14. Colorado 

Gender pay gap: 18.1%

(Jesse Varner/Flickr)

13. Massachusetts

Gender pay gap: 18.0%

(Manu_H/Flickr)

12. Oregon

Gender pay gap: 17.8%

(AP)

11. Connecticut

Gender pay gap: 17.4%

(Dougtone/Flickr)

10. Vermont

Gender pay gap: 16.2%

(pthread1981/Flickr)

9.  Arizona

Gender pay gap: 15.9%

(Photoshot Holdings Ltd / Alamy)

8. California

Gender pay gap: 15.8%

(Robert Landau / Alamy)

7. North Carolina

Gender pay gap: 15.3%

(sevenblock/Flickr)

6. Florida

Gender pay gap: 15.1%

(FL Stock / Alamy)

5. Nevada

Gender pay gap: 14.9%

(D-Stanley/Flickr)

4. Maryland

Gender pay gap: 14.6%

(tim caynes/Flickr)

3. Hawaii

Gender pay gap: 14.1%

(Mauro Ladu / Alamy)

2. New York

Gender pay gap: 13.2%

(drpavloff/Flickr)

1. Washington D.C.

Gender pay gap: 10.4%

(Alexandre Deslongchamps via Getty Images)

Puerto Rico has the smallest gender pay gap, and it benefits women. 

Gender pay gap: -4.6% -- Women earn more than men by a small margin

(Fuse via Getty Images)

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11. Game artist

15.8% base pay difference

Women earn $0.84 for every $1 men earn.

10. Pilot

16.0% base pay difference

Women earn $0.84 for every $1 men earn.

9. Optician

17.3% base pay difference

Women earn $0.83 for every $1 men earn.

8. Physician

18.2% base pay difference

Women earn $0.82 for every $1 men earn.

7. Computer-aided design designer

21.5% base pay difference

Women earn $0.78 for every $1 men earn.

6. Pharmacist

21.8% base pay difference

Women earn $0.78 for every $1 men earn.

5. Psychologist

27.2% base pay difference

Women earn $0.73 for every $1 men earn.

4. C-suite executive

27.7% base pay difference

Women earn $0.72 for every $1 men earn.

3. Dentist

28.1% base pay difference

Women earn $0.72 for every $1 men earn.

2. Chef

28.1% base pay difference

Women earn $0.72 for every $1 men earn.

1. Computer programmer

28.3% base pay difference

Women earn $0.72 for every $1 men earn.

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SEE ALSO: Harvard economist says closing the US gender wage gap isn't as simple as 'equal pay for equal work'

DON'T MISS: A new study shows the majority of Americans are woefully misinformed about how much they're paid

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